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megimoo
01-26-2009, 12:18 AM
Google plans to make PCs history

"More "BIG BROTHER' From Obama's State Security Organ ."


"These people are seriously into spying on America for Obama .They have about as much 'Finesse' as an alligator."

Google is to launch a service that would enable users to access their personal computer from any internet connection, according to industry reports. But campaigners warn that it would give the online behemoth unprecedented control over individuals' personal data.

The Google Drive, or "GDrive", could kill off the desktop computer, which relies on a powerful hard drive. Instead a user's personal files and operating system could be stored on Google's own servers and accessed via the internet.

The long-rumoured GDrive is expected to be launched this year, according to the technology news website TG Daily, which described it as "the most anticipated Google product so far". It is seen as a paradigm shift away from Microsoft's Windows operating system, which runs inside most of the world's computers, in favour of "cloud computing", where the processing and storage is done thousands of miles away in remote data centres.

Home and business users are increasingly turning to web-based services, usually free, ranging from email (such as Hotmail and Gmail) and digital photo storage (such as Flickr and Picasa) to more applications for documents and spreadsheets (such as Google Apps). The loss of a laptop or crash of a hard drive does not jeopardise the data because it is regularly saved in "the cloud" and can be accessed via the web from any machine.

The GDrive would follow this logic to its conclusion by shifting the contents of a user's hard drive to the Google servers. The PC would be a simpler, cheaper device acting as a portal to the web, perhaps via an adaptation of Google's operating system for mobile phones, Android. Users would think of their computer as software rather than hardware.

"They already have these .They are called 'internet appliances',pc's minus a hard drive !"

It is this prospect that alarms critics of Google's ambitions. Peter Brown, executive director of the Free Software Foundation, a charity defending computer users' liberties, did not dispute the convenience offered, but said: "It's a little bit like saying, 'we're in a dictatorship, the trains are running on time.' But does it matter to you that someone can see everything on your computer? Does it matter that Google can be subpoenaed at any time to hand over all your data to the American government?"

Google refused to confirm the GDrive, but acknowledged the growing demand for cloud computing. Dave Armstrong, head of product and marketing for Google Enterprise, said: "There's a clear direction ... away from people thinking, 'This is my PC, this is my hard drive,' to 'This is how I interact with information, this is how I interact with the web.'"


http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/jan/25/google-drive-gdrive-internet

PoliCon
01-26-2009, 12:42 AM
The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .

megimoo
01-26-2009, 01:03 AM
The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .
It goes far beyond that .They could care less about piracy,they are interested in what you are spreading about on the web and who is helping you do it.They know that as the changes are made to the law and the constitution that people will rebel and they need to identify the ringleaders and round them up quick .They will start with Limbaugh and Hennity and then go after Free republic and StopObama.com shutting them down for some blown up reason.Google is key to their plans for gathering anti Obama data on the net .

PoliCon
01-26-2009, 01:50 AM
someone needs a new tinfoil hat . . . .

AmPat
01-26-2009, 06:35 AM
someone needs a new tinfoil hat . . . .

Time will tell. You must admit though that boogiemen aside, unintended consequences could lead to exactly what the article suggests. I'm for fighting this possibility every step.:cool:

FlaGator
01-26-2009, 06:50 AM
The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .

In the tech industry, we've been anticipating this for a long time, at least from a storage perspective. We've imagined the benefits of all personal media being keep in a central storage system that could be accessed any where. Data files and the software to run them could be downloaded on to small computers and executed locally. The transmission speeds aren't there yet but very soon this will be a possiblity. If the privacy issues can be worked out this could be a great thing for reducing the cost, size and weight of computers while increasing the size and decreasing the cost of data storage.

3rd-try
01-26-2009, 07:51 AM
Tinfoil or not, the potential for abuse is huge. To think otherwise is unrealistic. It's centralized information folks! Take all the arguments against registration of all firearms and multiply by a thousand for starters...

FlaGator
01-26-2009, 08:41 AM
Tinfoil or not, the potential for abuse is huge. To think otherwise is unrealistic. It's centralized information folks! Take all the arguments against registration of all firearms and multiply by a thousand for starters...

The potential abuse in just about every piece of technology is huge. Should be abandon every piece of new technology because it has the potential to be abused?

3rd-try
01-26-2009, 06:22 PM
The potential abuse in just about every piece of technology is huge. Should be abandon every piece of new technology because it has the potential to be abused?

Thats a bit too general, don't you think?
Is transferring ALL our computer information to a central data bank necessary for the internet's survival? What happens if we continue as is, Does the 'net explode?
You can't deny the potential for abuse. Accessing such a goldmine of business, and otherwise personal information will become a priority in several circles, legal and otherwise. And the gain that makes it risk worth taking is exactly what?

FlaGator
01-26-2009, 06:47 PM
Thats a bit too general, don't you think?
Is transferring ALL our computer information to a central data bank necessary for the internet's survival? What happens if we continue as is, Does the 'net explode?
You can't deny the potential for abuse. Accessing such a goldmine of business, and otherwise personal information will become a priority in several circles, legal and otherwise. And the gain that makes it risk worth taking is exactly what?

Some of the privacy issues can be resolved with encryption, but the government does keep a heavy hand in the encryption game. Any encryption (with the exception of quantum encryption) can be broken given a strong enough desire to break it. Most stuff that you will keep on line won't be so valuable as to cause someone to expend the effort to hack it. To be honest, it will be more secure that an alarm system on your home. Such systems only discourage robbers and thieves and any determined thief will circumvent you locks and security system. In the end, it will be a lot harder and more costly for someone to crack encryption on network storage than it would be for a burglar to bypass your system.

Molon Labe
01-26-2009, 06:55 PM
someone needs a new tinfoil hat . . . .

This isn't tinfoil. Tinfoil is aliens and things you can't prove with tangible evidence. Our feds got a plethora of evidence of being in everyones business they can be. You couple that with technological ability.....and I'm highly skeptical the holy fed is using it only for good intentions.

It should be a concern to anyone that cares about privacy rights...liberties etc.
Just read Andrew Napolitano's book "Nation of Sheep".

FlaGator
01-26-2009, 07:06 PM
This isn't tinfoil. Tinfoil is aliens and things you can't prove with tangible evidence. Our feds got a plethora of evidence of being in everyones business they can be. You couple that with technological ability.....and I'm highly skeptical the holy fed is using it only for good intentions.

It should be a concern to anyone that cares about privacy rights...liberties etc.
Just read Andrew Napolitano's book "Nation of Sheep".

Why this is a moot point (in my opinion) is that the feds can currently find out pretty much anything they want about you if you do something to make them think that it's in their best interests to know it. My point being that the current situation is no different than a future one.

AHeneen
01-26-2009, 08:40 PM
If people want t compute this way...let them. This won't replace PCs, this is convenience for people constantly on the go. I had one experience with Apple's .mac service. The company decided to completely revamp the service (adding lots of new features) this past July. Apparently the switch didn't go well, because the service was down for almost 2 weeks. Some people (supposedly a tenth of a percent of customers) lost all their email messages, files, & images on the system. In short, the service looks good, but I wouldn't trust it one bit!

AmPat
01-26-2009, 10:03 PM
. Any encryption can be broken given a strong enough desire to break it. Most stuff that you will keep on line won't be so valuable as to cause someone to expend the effort to hack it. .......... more costly for someone to crack encryption on network storage than it would be for a burglar to bypass your system.

This is one of the few times I disagree with you. The cost of accessing your information will be worth it if it gives another the money or power they desire. From the lengths we see the Liberals take, this is considered risk worthy to them. I don't trust liberals. They think any means justifies their ends. They feel that their position is right and superior and will resort to any measure to force you to accept it.

Look at any election beginning 2000. You could go back much earlier in Chicago. Look at MN Senate race. Clinton I and II are gold mines of self interest but usually liberal enough to make the list of examples. How did Hillery's finger prints get on those FBI files of potential political enemies? (You remember the files that she couldn't recall seeing)?

Watch for the sequel: Return of the Fairness Doctrine! or, How to Legally Silence the Opposition in a Free Democracy.

wilbur
01-26-2009, 10:07 PM
It goes far beyond that .They could care less about piracy,they are interested in what you are spreading about on the web and who is helping you do it.They know that as the changes are made to the law and the constitution that people will rebel and they need to identify the ringleaders and round them up quick .They will start with Limbaugh and Hennity and then go after Free republic and StopObama.com shutting them down for some blown up reason.Google is key to their plans for gathering anti Obama data on the net .

The Kool-aid is going to your head.

Make no mistake, its not for the most savoury of purposes that tech companies are pushing for software as a service... vendor lock-in, no piracy, they can data mine your personal info for better targetted ads and other services etc... any marketers wet dream and then some. Companies like microsoft love the idea because it will also help them combat open source.

But good grief.... you get a big fat facepalm megs!

The one thing we can be thankful for so far, is that Google seems to act semi-responsibly and ethically... at least compared with... I dunno... your typical telco...

PoliCon
01-26-2009, 10:13 PM
This isn't tinfoil. Tinfoil is aliens and things you can't prove with tangible evidence. Our feds got a plethora of evidence of being in everyones business they can be. You couple that with technological ability.....and I'm highly skeptical the holy fed is using it only for good intentions.

It should be a concern to anyone that cares about privacy rights...liberties etc.
Just read Andrew Napolitano's book "Nation of Sheep".
Tinfoil also applies to those who think the government is beaming stuff into their heads and other such conspiracy theories. Don't get me wrong - I'm against this on all levels. I don't want my stuff out of my control - and I don't want remote software either.

megimoo
01-26-2009, 10:25 PM
In the tech industry, we've been anticipating this for a long time, at least from a storage perspective. We've imagined the benefits of all personal media being keep in a central storage system that could be accessed any where. Data files and the software to run them could be downloaded on to small computers and executed locally. The transmission speeds aren't there yet but very soon this will be a possiblity. If the privacy issues can be worked out this could be a great thing for reducing the cost, size and weight of computers while increasing the size and decreasing the cost of data storage.

"In the tech industry, we've been anticipating this for a long time, at least from a storage perspective. "

My problem with the entire scheme is one of data security.Lots of customers have proprietary ways of doing business and value their customers identity and don't want it revealed.Crunching large data files over high speed links is time consuming and slow.Processing locally requires storage either hard disk or flash memory s.s state disk.attempting to do process I/O over HS lines is a fallacy .Either you ship the entire program data base and all library's to Google and run the program on their processors or you page fault forever without local runtime storage.

"We've imagined the benefits of all personal media being keep in a central storage system that could be accessed any where. "

Again the issue is data and customer identification security .I fail to see any advantage in allowing Google easy access to my business data especially as the price of local bulk storage is falling like a rock.storage is cheap and getting cheaper and faster.The ability to remotely access to data on your own computer has been available for some time.

"Data files and the software to run them could be downloaded on to small computers and executed locally."

Again without a fairly large local storage device of some kind program execution is near impossible. Where would you store run time tables and intrem data without local storage. A Von Neuman computer architecture dictates a machine within a machine to function and depending on the program design generates a lot of page activity as data is moved around .Trying to do this over an internet broadband link would be a horror show due to the data path's bandwidth .

"The transmission speeds aren't there yet but very soon this will be a possibility."

cable modem technology can theoretically support up to about 30 Mbps, most providers offer service with between 1 Mbps and 6 Mbps bandwidth for downloads, and bandwidth between 128 Kbps and 768 Kbps for uploads. Cable modem transmission is serial data one bit wide.A computer's backplane supports a sixty four bit wide parallel digital data word .In order to send a single parallel sixty four bit plus eight house keeping bits word a seventy two bit shift regester would need to be clocked seventy two times further dividing down the data transfer rate.

Each serial ASCII character is only three bits wide . Each letter and number on your key board has a unique ASCII character of three bits .Each word typed is sent over the cable as a serial data stream to CU .While typing the bandwidth used is quite low but try it times seventy two bits at once as in one data word from the data casche !



"If the privacy issues can be worked out this could be a great thing for reducing the cost, size and weight of computers while increasing the size and decreasing the cost of data storage."

With the storage size increasing and price falling every day local achieves are much cheaper than anything Google can offer.Google isn't going to do this without some cost to the users .

Ranger Rick
01-27-2009, 01:27 AM
The down side for me would be having another monthly bill. All my data would be deleted if not payed.

No it is easier and cheaper to keep it at home, on my computer.

3rd-try
01-27-2009, 08:00 AM
The Google story over on the Political news forum gets the credit for my initial dislike of The concept. And, I don't see benefits that out weigh that concern. Goggle's political leaning is pretty well known.

Gingersnap
01-27-2009, 10:12 AM
This is one of those concepts that has the potential to be both useful and destructive. This idea sounds a lot like the virtual pc. We already use them and they do have applications that are pretty neat.

On the other hand, I certainly don't share wilbur's faith in Google.

megimoo
01-27-2009, 11:29 AM
The Kool-aid is going to your head.

Make no mistake, its not for the most savoury of purposes that tech companies are pushing for software as a service... vendor lock-in, no piracy, they can data mine your personal info for better targetted ads and other services etc... any marketers wet dream and then some. Companies like microsoft love the idea because it will also help them combat open source.

But good grief.... you get a big fat facepalm megs!

The one thing we can be thankful for so far, is that Google seems to act semi-responsibly and ethically... at least compared with... I dunno... your typical telco...
Mock me if you will as I have come to expect with you Willie !Your very words bely your argument don't you think ?
"they can data mine your personal info for better targetted ads and other services etc." If company's are able to 'mine' my data what would stop a hostile government from doing the same thing , willie ?

You without fail will reactivley support the far left causes at every opportunity and have lost all credibility as an objective thinking individual .Do you find the idea of the government being interested in what the opposing political activity is especially where it concerns the current administration foolish and idiotic ?

Do you notice coincidences and call any question of commonality as a potential scheme a case of TinFoil madness.These things have been proven to have happened many times in the past with NSA 'mining' web traffic for years and tracking phone calls for 'key word 'traffic !

The reason an outfit like Google would appeal to those who listen is obvious .NSA is a very expensive organisation to operate with billions in equipment costs and highly paid operators better suited to espionage work than domestic evesdropping !Google on the other hand is an organization with a common interest in data mining who's operations are loaded with storage and computing power and most importantly politically very friendly to this administration .

Search engines as we, the public,now use them are a 'keyed' that is request driven by a user.There is no reason why several hundred or even thousand algorithmically driven searches all operating at the same times across the web .Much as the spiders they now use but with built in criteria to * parse things of interest for the powers that be !

It is a given that NSA has been doing this domestically for years and and your people moaned and groaned about the loss of freedon .With the advent of Obama's incentives and the political awakening of Google you choose to make light of the observed possibility's of Googles being use in domestic spying .
.................................................. ............

*pares,parser - a computer program that divides code up into functional components; to analyze syntactically by assigning a constituent structure to (a sentence) and logging the source,words and day/time.

Molon Labe
01-27-2009, 11:46 AM
It is a given that NSA has been doing this domestically for years and and your people moaned and groaned about the loss of freedon .With the advent of Obama's incentives and the political awakening of Google you choose to make light of the observed possibility's of Googles being use in domestic spying .

You make a great observation. I've been scanning the same old blogs and sites as I have been for the past years and the concern for secret spying has all but slowed to a crawl since the Messiah took over. I certainly hope it's not partisan bullshoy. It's still a big problem in my opinion.