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View Full Version : Australian Householders to be charged for each flush of toilet



megimoo
02-17-2009, 12:45 AM
HOUSEHOLDERS would be charged for each flush under a radical new toilet tax designed to help beat the drought.

The scheme would replace the current system, which sees sewage charges based on a home's value - not its waste water output. CSIRO Policy and Economic Research Unit member Jim McColl and Adelaide University Water Management Professor Mike Young plan to promote the move to state and federal politicians and experts across the country.

"It would encourage people to reduce their sewage output by taking shorter showers,recycling washing machine water or connecting rainwater tanks to internal plumbingto reduce their charges,''Professor Young said. "Some people may go as far as not flushing their toilet as often because the less sewage you produce, the less sewage rate you pay.''

Professor Young said sewer pricing needed to be addressed as part of the response to the water crisis.
"People have been frightened to talk about sewage because it is yucky stuff, but it is critically important to address it, as part of the whole water cycle,'' he said.

"We are looking at reforming the way sewage is priced and this plan will drive interest in the different ways water is used throughout Australia.'' The reform would see the abolition of the property-based charge with one based on a pay-as-you-go rate and a small fixed annual fee to cover the cost of meter readings and pipeline maintenance, Professor Young said.

The pay-as-you-go rate would provide financial savings for those who reduce their waste water output.


http://www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,24659589-5005369,00.html

Apocalypse
02-17-2009, 12:58 AM
or connecting rainwater tanks to internal plumbingto reduce their charges,

So their not looking to charge for the amount they send down the sewer, but for the amount of water one uses, much as the way we charge here in the states.

Gingersnap
02-17-2009, 09:44 AM
In Colorado, it's illegal to divert rain or runoff to household or yard uses. It's illegal to use graywater for watering. In fact, it's pretty much illegal to do anything with water. :eek:

Odysseus
02-17-2009, 01:18 PM
So their not looking to charge for the amount they send down the sewer, but for the amount of water one uses, much as the way we charge here in the states.

Which strikes me as logical, especially since water is a commodity and right now, with the restricted supply caused by the drought, the price should be tied to demand, as indicated by use. It may end up costing some folks more, but it also provides the opportunity for reducing costs through simple behavior changes or installation of improved systems.

Eventually, the drought will end, but by tying the cost to usage, the system will be in a better position to respond to the market, and initially, the changeover will allow some innovation as the utility is flush with cash.

PoliCon
02-17-2009, 01:20 PM
unless I'm wrong - my sweage bill is based upon my water bill. For every gallon I take in - I pay so much automatically for sewage costs. . . . .