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Gingersnap
02-24-2009, 04:40 PM
Tomorrow marks the beginning of Lent. In my own tradition, this means meatless Wednesdays and Fridays although fishy items are allowed. For the Orthodox, this means no flesh and no fat. The Baptists will have to give up the medicinal beer.

What are some good budget-stretching meals for Lent? Is Lent important foodwise in your Christian walk? If you aren't Christian, well....you still probably have a good veggie soup recipe. ;)

PoliCon
02-24-2009, 05:12 PM
Tomorrow marks the beginning of Lent. In my own tradition, this means meatless Wednesdays and Fridays although fishy items are allowed. For the Orthodox, this means no flesh and no fat. The Baptists will have to give up the medicinal beer.

What are some good budget-stretching meals for Lent? Is Lent important foodwise in your Christian walk? If you aren't Christian, well....you still probably have a good veggie soup recipe. ;)

You want a good soup recipe that's easy on the wallet?

This is a form of depression soup - a recipe handed down from my grandparents - one they used during the depression.

Ingredients -

Water
Potatoes
Chopped spinach
2 sticks of butter or oleo
salt & pepper

Dice up some taters and put them in a big pot. Add water. Add spinach. Add butter. Salt and pepper to taste - boil.

when the taters is soft - the soup is dun.

I always make it with butter because it makes the flavor much better than oleo . . . .

stsinner
02-24-2009, 05:17 PM
Does my heart good to see such conversation.. I love that soup recipe.. Our kids, and us for that matter, don't know anything about how it must have felt to be FORCED to serve that soup to our kids.. I love to teach my kids about stuff like that. I fear those days may be coming again...

PoliCon
02-24-2009, 05:26 PM
Well if you like that one - there is a similar meat version that works just as well -

Ingredents -

Taters
Onions
Ground beef
Water
Salt & pepper.

Slice up the taters like you would for an au gratan - put them in a pot with plent of water. Crumble in the raw ground beef. Add diced onion. salt and peper to taste. Boil. Soup is done when the taters is soft.

The great thing about both soups is when you reheat them - the character of the soup changes - they get thicker from the taters boiling away - which makes them better. :)

Gingersnap
02-24-2009, 05:52 PM
Does my heart good to see such conversation.. I love that soup recipe.. Our kids, and us for that matter, don't know anything about how it must have felt to be FORCED to serve that soup to our kids.. I love to teach my kids about stuff like that. I fear those days may be coming again...

You're in the right place. We love budget food, home sewing/gardening/amusement, pinching pennies until Lincoln screams and other thrifty habits. ;)

megimoo
02-24-2009, 06:07 PM
Tomorrow marks the beginning of Lent. In my own tradition, this means meatless Wednesdays and Fridays although fishy items are allowed. For the Orthodox, this means no flesh and no fat. The Baptists will have to give up the medicinal beer.

What are some good budget-stretching meals for Lent? Is Lent important foodwise in your Christian walk? If you aren't Christian, well....you still probably have a good veggie soup recipe. ;)

Depression Dining: What to cook when times get tough


Pat Box grew up in a large family in Boyle Heights section of Los Angeles, Calif. No one went hungry, but it took ingenuity. Illustrates FOOD-DEPRESSION (category d)

LOS ANGELES When she was a kid, for a treat Pat Box and her seven siblings got "water cocoa," which is pretty much what it sounds like and nothing special today. But that was in the 1930s, when her father's business was reselling bakers' barrels to coopers, and the family would get first crack at them, scraping the wood for any traces of sugar or cocoa left behind.

With luck, they'd also have rye bread and fresh butter they'd buy on Brooklyn Avenue.

"It was wonderful," said Box, 87, one afternoon while she gathered with friends at the Claude Pepper Senior Center on the west side of Los Angeles.

At a time when Americans face frightening and disorienting economic uncertainty, the Great Depression provides valuable lessons. For many people, putting a meal on the table without turning to processed or takeout foods is no longer something just for a weekend dinner party but a skill they must learn. People who remember what it was like to eat during the Depression talk about thrift, growing their own, sharing with neighbors and learning to cope with what they had.
..................................more

http://www.salisburypost.com/Lifestyle/121708-food-depression

lurkalot
02-24-2009, 06:14 PM
Once again I will do my traditional giving up of Lent for sex ;)

Gingersnap
02-24-2009, 06:17 PM
Once again I will do my traditional giving up of Lent for sex ;)

Sex for Lent, you mean. How does that impact your chocolate intake? I mean giving up the decorative, ediblble kind?

PoliCon
02-24-2009, 06:18 PM
Once again I will do my traditional giving up of Lent for sex ;)

interesting . . . I tend to give up all drinks except water for the 40 days of lent. It sucks. It's hard. I usually feel awesome after - and chug a beer as soon as the fast is lifted!

megimoo
02-24-2009, 06:28 PM
Tomorrow marks the beginning of Lent. In my own tradition, this means meatless Wednesdays and Fridays although fishy items are allowed. For the Orthodox, this means no flesh and no fat. The Baptists will have to give up the medicinal beer.

What are some good budget-stretching meals for Lent? Is Lent important foodwise in your Christian walk? If you aren't Christian, well....you still probably have a good veggie soup recipe. ;)

Lent in a Baptist Church?

When I first announced that we would be observing Lent at CrossRoad Church it created quite a stir amongst several members and frequent attenders. One well-meaning, but hopelessly sarcastic, friend even asked me if we were giving up being Baptist for Lent! For others it was no joking matter. There was concern on their part that we were doing something that identified us with the Roman Catholic Church and that was unhealthy. Today, as we prepare to kick off our observance of Lent, I thought I would make an effort to quell some of our members' fears and encourage all of you to use this time to seek a closer relationship with God as we prepare for Easter.


Isn't Lent a Roman Catholic thing?

The answer to this question is Yes and No. Yes, Roman Catholics observe Lent, but so do Presbyterians, Methodists, Anglicans, and Lutherans. Just because the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) observes Lent, however, does not mean that we are somehow sacrificing the gospel or identifying with the RCC with our observance. Lent, as a church observance, actually preceded the formation of the RCC by at least 200 years.........more

The Who, What, When, and Where of Lent .

When Lent first began to be observed in the church, it was common practice to baptize new Christians once a year. The baptisms took place on Easter. All new Christians were discipled (catechized) from the time they trusted in Christ until Easter when they were Baptized. The early churches, in an effort to help these young Christians grasp the significance of both their baptism and Easter celebrations, required them to fast for forty hours prior to their baptism. The fast was then broken after their baptism when the church celebrated its Easter feast. Gradually the entire church began to observe Lent as a way to prepare for their church's Easter celebrations. The length of time gradually was extended from forty hours to forty days
...................more

But Why Lent?

http://bontsblog.blogspot.com/2007/02/lent-in-baptist-church.html

lurkalot
02-24-2009, 06:40 PM
Sex for Lent, you mean. How does that impact your chocolate intake? I mean giving up the decorative, ediblble kind?

NO, I had it right the first time, I gave up Lent for sex....
chocolate wasn't even considered...that is a necessity for life, both mine and those around me :cool:

Space Gravy
02-24-2009, 07:59 PM
I give up church for lent.

Gingersnap
02-24-2009, 09:55 PM
Lent in a Baptist Church?

When I first announced that we would be observing Lent at CrossRoad Church it created quite a stir amongst several members and frequent attenders. One well-meaning, but hopelessly sarcastic, friend even asked me if we were giving up being Baptist for Lent! For others it was no joking matter. There was concern on their part that we were doing something that identified us with the Roman Catholic Church and that was unhealthy. Today, as we prepare to kick off our observance of Lent, I thought I would make an effort to quell some of our members' fears and encourage all of you to use this time to seek a closer relationship with God as we prepare for Easter.


Isn't Lent a Roman Catholic thing?

The answer to this question is Yes and No. Yes, Roman Catholics observe Lent, but so do Presbyterians, Methodists, Anglicans, and Lutherans. Just because the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) observes Lent, however, does not mean that we are somehow sacrificing the gospel or identifying with the RCC with our observance. Lent, as a church observance, actually preceded the formation of the RCC by at least 200 years.........more

The Who, What, When, and Where of Lent .

When Lent first began to be observed in the church, it was common practice to baptize new Christians once a year. The baptisms took place on Easter. All new Christians were discipled (catechized) from the time they trusted in Christ until Easter when they were Baptized. The early churches, in an effort to help these young Christians grasp the significance of both their baptism and Easter celebrations, required them to fast for forty hours prior to their baptism. The fast was then broken after their baptism when the church celebrated its Easter feast. Gradually the entire church began to observe Lent as a way to prepare for their church's Easter celebrations. The length of time gradually was extended from forty hours to forty days
...................more

But Why Lent?

http://bontsblog.blogspot.com/2007/02/lent-in-baptist-church.html

Excellent, Moo.

Lent isn't a popish throw-back. Lent is a time for searching our minds about Christian discipline and repentance. Christ was big on the repenting thing. Unlike contemporary Christian leaders, Christ counseled his followers to be attentive to prayer and fasting. Not because they were evil (although some might have been) but because it's a discipline that carries over to ordinary life.

Enough of all that!

Let's get to the non-bacon recipes!

Hawkgirl
02-25-2009, 01:57 AM
I am roman catholic and I give up meat on Fridays.
Which is not hard as I usually make grilled cheese sandwhiches, PB & J, lentil soups, fried tilapia, tuna salad sandwhich or tuna salad with pasta...pizza...the options are endless.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 07:53 AM
interesting . . . I tend to give up all drinks except water for the 40 days of lent. It sucks. It's hard. I usually feel awesome after - and chug a beer as soon as the fast is lifted!

That's why I don't do that. The former rector of our church stressed that Lenten duty should be something that could really alter your behavior in an ongoing way, in order to be meaningful. Giving up wine or beer just to hit it full force again when the "deadline" is reached isn't life changing. One year I did give up hard liquor, and consequently I have never drunk it since as regularly as I did before.

Celtic Rose
02-25-2009, 09:03 AM
This year I'm going to try to make more international type vegan dishes (I'm orthodox, so like Ginger said, no meat, no dairy, no eggs, no fish, no alcohol, and no oil, but I tend to be a bit lenient about the oil in things like Hummus). I'll let you all know how it goes, and post the good recipes on here :)

I tend to eat a lot of Oatmeal for breakfast during Lent, and I'll admit to using non-dairy creamer :p

My priest really emphasizes that Lent is not just about fasting, it is about spending the time drawing closer to God with prayer, almsgiving, as well as fasting. The fast should also be a fast from sinful behavior, so if you are keeping the fast from food, but you continue to sin frequently and knowingly, then you aren't really keeping the fast. It should be a time of self reflection to find the parts of our lives that are keeping us separated from God.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 09:19 AM
To answer the food question, I have a couple of good monastery cookbooks which I'll be using quite a bit for the next forty or so days. I normally keep my weight under control, but I want to make a concentrated effort to lose ten pounds during Lent by being more thoughtful about what I'm eating.

Phillygirl
02-25-2009, 09:21 AM
For some reason I seem to always end up on South Beach at Lent. Fridays get difficult, as I hate tuna. My eggplant bake works pretty well, though.

1 medium sized eggplant
1 small onion
1/3 jar roasted red peppers
1 jar no-sugar added marinara sauce (I used Trader Joe’s Organic)
1/3 package Mozzarrella cheese
½ small package ricotta cheese
garlic
olive oil

Slice eggplant, brush with olive oil and bake on a cookie sheet in oven, app. 5 minutes per side
Slice onion and carmelize (with garlic if you like garlic)
Layer the eggplant, onions, red peppers, cheeses and marinara sauce in small casserole dish
Bake for approximately 45 minutes

PoliCon
02-25-2009, 09:27 AM
That's why I don't do that. The former rector of our church stressed that Lenten duty should be something that could really alter your behavior in an ongoing way, in order to be meaningful. Giving up wine or beer just to hit it full force again when the "deadline" is reached isn't life changing. One year I did give up hard liquor, and consequently I have never drunk it since as regularly as I did before. I disagree. Lent is not about behavioral modification - giving up something for lent is about making a sacrifice - to deny yourself some creature comfort so as to better relate to the sacrifice which Christ made. if it results in some lasting change - so be it - but that should not be your motivation going in. I try to find something to give up that will be a serious sacrifice but that will not make me want to kill people. One year I gave up the internet - one year I gave up meat completely - I've done the water thing a few times - one year the Mrs and I even gave up sex for lent . . . . let me tell you - that was HARD! In more ways than one!! :D

linda22003
02-25-2009, 09:30 AM
Tonight I'm cutting up an eggplant for a good vegetarian chili, with onions, peppers, and beans. A little shredded cheddar on top doesn't hurt either, although I will probably give up the dollop of sour cream on top as a nod to seasonal deprivation. The Silver Palate's vegetarian chili recipe is the one I usually use.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 09:33 AM
I disagree. Lent is not about behavioral modification - giving up something for lent is about making a sacrifice - to deny yourself some creature comfort so as to better relate to the sacrifice which Christ made. if it results in some lasting change - so be it - but that should not be your motivation going in. I try to find something to give up that will be a serious sacrifice but that will not make me want to kill people. One year I gave up the internet - one year I gave up meat completely - I've done the water thing a few times - one year the Mrs and I even gave up sex for lent . . . . let me tell you - that was HARD! In more ways than one!! :D

It is making a sacrifice, but if you can maintain being a "better" person, that's all to the good and makes the sacrifice more meaningful. Otherwise, you're just sitting in the 'penalty box' counting the days until you can drink or have stuffed-crust pizza again. That's my opinion of course, and my practice.

I've given up meat with no problem, and to this day we have more vegetarian and fish dishes during the week than we did before. I suggested giving up sex for Lent one year, but my husband is Jewish and doesn't understand all the fine points of Lent; he asked if Christians get "extra points" for punishing others, as well. :p

Gingersnap
02-25-2009, 09:47 AM
To answer the food question, I have a couple of good monastery cookbooks which I'll be using quite a bit for the next forty or so days.

Do you have the one on soup? I have that one and it gets quite a workout during Lent. We're eating out tonight but I'll be firing up the crockpot for soup tomorrow.

FlaGator
02-25-2009, 09:51 AM
I disagree. Lent is not about behavioral modification - giving up something for lent is about making a sacrifice - to deny yourself some creature comfort so as to better relate to the sacrifice which Christ made. if it results in some lasting change - so be it - but that should not be your motivation going in. I try to find something to give up that will be a serious sacrifice but that will not make me want to kill people. One year I gave up the internet - one year I gave up meat completely - I've done the water thing a few times - one year the Mrs and I even gave up sex for lent . . . . let me tell you - that was HARD! In more ways than one!! :D

But it is not really denying yourself if you give up something temporarily. Linda is right. Lent is about changing your life and drawing closer to God.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 10:02 AM
Do you have the one on soup? I have that one and it gets quite a workout during Lent. We're eating out tonight but I'll be firing up the crockpot for soup tomorrow.

Not specifically, although both have soup recipes. They are Fr. Victor d'Avila-Tourrette's "From a Monastery Kitchen" and "Simplicity from a Monastery Kitchen". I cheat on soups; when he calls for water I use my own homemade stock instead.

Gingersnap
02-25-2009, 11:17 AM
Not specifically, although both have soup recipes. They are Fr. Victor d'Avila-Tourrette's "From a Monastery Kitchen" and "Simplicity from a Monastery Kitchen". I cheat on soups; when he calls for water I use my own homemade stock instead.

This one is called "Twelve Months of Monastery Soups" by Victor D'Avila-Latourrette. Brother Vic is pretty into the whole stock-making thing.

PoliCon
02-25-2009, 11:38 AM
It is making a sacrifice, but if you can maintain being a "better" person, that's all to the good and makes the sacrifice more meaningful. Otherwise, you're just sitting in the 'penalty box' counting the days until you can drink or have stuffed-crust pizza again. That's my opinion of course, and my practice.

I've given up meat with no problem, and to this day we have more vegetarian and fish dishes during the week than we did before. I suggested giving up sex for Lent one year, but my husband is Jewish and doesn't understand all the fine points of Lent; he asked if Christians get "extra points" for punishing others, as well. :p
Linda - making yourself a better person is something you are supposed to be doing all year round. Lent is going that extra mile and WILLINGLY making that little bit of an extra sacrifice - to both be better able to relate to the suffering and sacrifice of Christ - and to make ourselves that much more conscious of how short we come to being what we should be.

PoliCon
02-25-2009, 11:39 AM
But it is not really denying yourself if you give up something temporarily. Linda is right. Lent is about changing your life and drawing closer to God.

no sir. Everyday is about changing your life and drawing closer to God. Lent is about going above and beyond.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 11:43 AM
This one is called "Twelve Months of Monastery Soups" by Victor D'Avila-Latourrette. Brother Vic is pretty into the whole stock-making thing.

Same author as my two. Looks like he's cornered the Priest Cookbook niche.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 11:45 AM
PoliCon, I said it was "my opinion and my practice". You're free to regard it differently, of course. Your posts are rather dogmatic. Oh, wait - you may be Catholic. ;)

Gingersnap
02-25-2009, 12:01 PM
PoliCon, I said it was "my opinion and my practice". You're free to regard it differently, of course. Your posts are rather dogmatic. Oh, wait - you may be Catholic. ;)

Is it time for the Anglicans to get drunk yet? :p

linda22003
02-25-2009, 12:27 PM
Is it time for the Anglicans to get drunk yet? :p

I wasn't aware there was a time that they couldn't. :eek:

PoliCon
02-25-2009, 01:37 PM
PoliCon, I said it was "my opinion and my practice". You're free to regard it differently, of course. Your posts are rather dogmatic. Oh, wait - you may be Catholic. ;)

No sorry - I'm not catholic. :p Closer to anglican than to catholic.

FlaGator
02-25-2009, 01:41 PM
no sir. Everyday is about changing your life and drawing closer to God. Lent is about going above and beyond.

Yes, but a lot of people identify lent as a specific time to do this. I know that it's about more than giving up a vice or two for 40 days and then back to the same old same old.

FlaGator
02-25-2009, 01:42 PM
I wasn't aware there was a time that they couldn't. :eek:

Drinking is ok. Getting drunk is a no no.

linda22003
02-25-2009, 01:43 PM
Drinking is ok. Getting drunk is a no no.

Episcopalians have a VERY high threshhold, so it's okay. :p

FlaGator
02-25-2009, 01:45 PM
Episcopalians have a VERY high threshhold, so it's okay. :p

Your telling me. Thats why I had to quit drinking. My threshhold was causing trouble ;)

PoliCon
02-25-2009, 01:45 PM
Yes, but a lot of people identify lent as a specific time to do this. I know that it's about more than giving up a vice or two for 40 days and then back to the same old same old.

I understand - which is why we're taught that our sacrifice shouldn't be a vice. Those you're not supposed to have the first place.