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AHeneen
02-28-2009, 11:41 PM
Chavez sends army to rice plants
Link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7917176.stm)

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has ordered the army to take control of all rice processing plants in the country.
Mr Chavez accused some firms of overcharging by refusing to produce rice at prices set by the government.
He warned that some companies could be nationalised if they tried to interfere with supplies of the grain.
Mr Chavez - who has nationalised large swathes of Venezuela's economy - did not say how long the government intervention would last.
Major rice processors in the country include the US-owned giant Cargill and Venezuela's main food company, Polar.
Last year, Venezuela seized control of plants and offices belonging to Mexican cement giant Cemex.
In 2007, the government said it had taken control of the massive Orinoco Belt oil projects as part of President Chavez's nationalisation drive.

Price squeeze

Announcing the move to send troops to the rice plants in a televised address to the nation on Saturday, Mr Chavez criticised the producers for failing to sell their rice at government prices.
"I have ordered the immediate intervention in all those sectors of agro-industry, intervention by the revolutionary government," he said.
"This government is here to protect the people, not the bourgeoisie or the rich."
He said that those companies who had threatened to paralyse rice production could be expropriated.
"I will expropriate them, I have no problem with that, and I'll pay them with bonds. Don't count on me paying with hard cash," he said, without mentioning any companies by name.
The agriculture minister later confirmed that the military were in control of at least one major national producer, Primor, the BBC's Will Grant reports from Caracas.
Further interventions are expected in the next 48 hours.
In Venezuela, the government provides basic foodstuffs at low prices in state-run markets known as "mercales".
But many rice, wheat, meat and dairy producers complain that the price regulations leave them without a profit and that many are facing bankruptcy, our correspondent says.
The country's inflation levels are the highest in Latin America and, as a result, there are often shortages of items such as rice and coffee, leading to hoarding and sale on the black market.
With President Chavez recently granted the right to stand for a third term in office, he is keen to ensure the provision of cheap food to the poor is not put in jeopardy, Will Grant adds.

Mugabe vows to seize more farms
Link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7916312.stm)
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has vowed to continue seizing land from white farmers after a spate of "farm invasions" over the past month.
Speaking at a rally to celebrate his 85th birthday, he also promised to push for majority Zimbabwean ownership of companies operating in the country.
Mugabe supporters raised $250,000 (176,000) for a lavish birthday party in Chinhoyi, north-west of Harare.
Zimbabwe asked African states for $2bn (1.4bn) in economic aid just days ago.
Morgan Tsvangirai, the new prime minister and former opposition leader, did not attend the celebrations despite earlier indications that he might.
Mr Mugabe's spokesman, George Charamba, told Reuters news agency Mr Tsvangirai had opted out of the event after realising it had been organised by the president's Zanu-PF party.
"People should not read this as a snub - he excused himself," Mr Charamba said.
Mr Mugabe turned 85 on 21 February but his party is being held a week later.

SADC 'nonsense'

Mr Mugabe told the rally in Chinhoyi there would be "no going back" on planned and already executed seizures of land owned by white farmers.
The Southern African Development Community (SADC) tribunal in Namibia had no right to intervene on the farmers' behalf, he said.
"Farms will not be returned back to former farmers," he told the audience.
"Some farmers went to the SADC... but that's nonsense, absolute nonsense, no-one will follow that.
"We have courts here in this country, that can determine the rights of people. Our land issues are not subject to the SADC tribunal."
In November, the tribunal ruled that Zimbabwe's plans to seize dozens of white-owned farms were illegal under international rule and should be halted immediately.
Zimbabwe's Commercial Farmers Union says that, in the past month, operations at about 150 farms have been disrupted. Some farmers have been evicted.
Mr Mugabe said the new government would continue to push for a majority stake in companies operating in Zimbabwe.
"We would want to see a greater participation of our people in them, not less than 51%, in certain companies we would have designated," he said.
Mr Mugabe also urged his supporters to accept the new power-sharing government but his latest message on land reform is a sign that he is still firmly in control, BBC Southern Africa correspondent Peter Biles reports from Johannesburg.
This week, Mr Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change said the government must intervene to stop farm disruptions, in order to enhance productivity.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45521000/jpg/_45521794_006952548-1.jpg

Economic woes

The birthday celebrations come as Zimbabwe struggles with the world's highest inflation, food shortages and a cholera epidemic which the World Health Organisation says has killed 3,894 people since August last year.
There have been more than 84,000 reported cases, says the WHO.
More than half the population is believed to need food aid, while just 10% of adults have a regular job.
Mr Tsvangirai - who was sworn in two weeks ago in a unity government with Mr Mugabe ending months of political deadlock - has said it will cost as much as $5bn to fix Zimbabwe's economy.
The country has asked for $2bn in emergency aid to revive public services and the business sector.
Following a two-day meeting of regional ministers in Cape Town, South Africa, members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the African Union pledged to "pursue measures in support of Zimbabwe's economic recovery programme".
But Western donors have said they are waiting for proof that the unity government is really working before sending in funds.

lacarnut
03-01-2009, 12:22 AM
I think that crap could happen here. We are on our way. The government owns 80% of AIG and owns billions in financial stocks like CITI, BOA, etc. The Big 3 will be nationalized. Add to that increased taxes and punishing success. It is getting scary, and there is a lot more in the Obamanation policies that will ground this economy into the dirt.

PoliCon
03-01-2009, 01:06 AM
get your guns people. We're gonna need them.

biccat
03-01-2009, 08:42 AM
More than half the population is believed to need food aid, while just 10% of adults have a regular job.
Mr Tsvangirai - who was sworn in two weeks ago in a unity government with Mr Mugabe ending months of political deadlock - has said it will cost as much as $5bn to fix Zimbabwe's economy.
The country has asked for $2bn in emergency aid to revive public services and the business sector.
Following a two-day meeting of regional ministers in Cape Town, South Africa, members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the African Union pledged to "pursue measures in support of Zimbabwe's economic recovery programme".
Why do we continue to send money and food to governments that abuse freedoms and destroy their own people? Even if we fed every starving person in Zimbabwe and made sure they had access to medical care, it would do nothing to alleviate the situation. They would be just another group of people sucking at the welfare teat of the United States.

ironhorsedriver
03-01-2009, 11:02 AM
Ah, Socialism at it's finest. I hope the Messiah is paying attention..Then, maybe I hope not.