PDA

View Full Version : America’s Not a Christian Nation—and I’m a Fat Black Lesbian Who Hates Hunting



megimoo
04-12-2009, 05:17 AM
Last week Obama told the planet on his Dixie Chick America Sucks Euro-Tour that ol’ bigheaded America is not and has never been a Christian nation. I believe he said that right after he bowed and curtsied to the Saudi King and told the French that the US has been stuck-up meanies to their jealous and ungrateful Euro-socialist cousins. Damn you, Yankee doodle dandies.

America’s not a Christian nation? Well, it’s not a Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim (yet) or Tai Chi nation. I know Barack is auguring for the USA to become an Obamanation, but heretofore from what I’ve read regarding our founders’ beliefs and original intent for this experiment in self-government, this Republic has a massive intentional Judeo-Christian bent to it and not a religiously neutral one. Stevie Wonder can see that.

Yep, our founding fathers liberally mixed our nation’s political cement with the rock-solid truths of the Judeo-Christian worldview. Christianity wasn’t the state’s declared religion, but our framers clearly stated that Christ and Moses were where this bad boy came from.

For example, Mr. President, consider this small little offering from a few of our founders regarding Jesus, Christianity and this archaic book called the Bible. Also, all you RINO wonks who want Christians and Christianity scrubbed from the GOP because you think we are ruining the party, you ought to read the following, as well. Christians are ruining the party? Puh-lease. Uh, we started the party, dillweeds. You’re the ones who’re whizzing on it.

For instance . . .

John Adams

You remember John, don’t ‘cha? He was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a judge, diplomat, signer of the Bill of Rights, and second President of the United States. Yeah, that John Adams. He said the following:

“The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.”

I bet your gay communist PoliSci teacher at Light-a-Fart University never told you that, eh? Allow me to continue.

“The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity.” That’ll tick the UN off, now won’t it?

The above from Adams sounds kinda Christiany to me. Do you need another example? How about old JQA, John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the US, diplomat, Secretary of State, US Senator, and US Representative.

“My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ and I cannot cavil or quibble away [evade or object to]. . . . the whole tenor of His conduct by which He sometimes positively asserted and at others countenances [permits] His disciples in asserting that He was God.”

I wonder if Chris Matthews, head Beavis on MSNBC, would’ve mocked him for his faith like he did Sarah Palin?

Quincy continues . . .

“The hope of a Christian is inseparable from his faith. Whoever believes in the Divine inspiration of the Holy Scriptures must hope that the religion of Jesus shall prevail throughout the earth. Never since the foundation of the world have the prospects of mankind been more encouraging to that hope than they appear to be at the present time. And may the associated distribution of the Bible proceed and prosper till the Lord shall have made ‘bare His holy arm in the eyes of all the nations, and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God’ [Isaiah 52:10].”

Hmm, do you think Kathleen Parker would have pooh-poohed old goofy John and his mixing of God and government if she were around back then? More from JQA . . .

“In the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior. The Declaration of Independence laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity.”

I’m so glad Adams didn’t read Cal Thomas’ book, Blinded by Might, because he might have never run for office.

http://townhall.com/columnists/DougGiles/2009/04/12/america%E2%80%99s_not_a_christian_nation%E2%80%94a nd_i%E2%80%99m_a_fat_black_lesbian_who_hates_hunti ng?page=1

samurai
04-12-2009, 06:18 PM
I myself am agnostic, but I know history. This nation indeed was founded on Judeo-Christian principles, and might not have succeeded without them. It was the founders' strong belief in freedom, and a desire to prevent government from creating a state religion like the Church of England or meddling in the affairs of the church, that caused them to separate the two, not because they were atheists... they clearly weren't.

FeebMaster
04-12-2009, 10:48 PM
John Adams, eh?


ARTICLE 11.

As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,-as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen,-and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.


Now be it known, That I John Adams, President of the United States of America, having seen and considered the said Treaty do, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, accept, ratify, and confirm the same, and every clause and article thereof. And to the End that the said Treaty may be observed, and performed with good Faith on the part of the United States, I have ordered the premises to be made public; And I do hereby enjoin and require all persons bearing office civil or military within the United States, and all other citizens or inhabitants thereof, faithfully to observe and fulfill the said Treaty and every clause and article thereof.

wilbur
04-12-2009, 11:29 PM
I myself am agnostic, but I know history. This nation indeed was founded on Judeo-Christian principles, and might not have succeeded without them. It was the founders' strong belief in freedom, and a desire to prevent government from creating a state religion like the Church of England or meddling in the affairs of the church, that caused them to separate the two, not because they were atheists... they clearly weren't.

The way Obama used the phrase was rhetorical... there was no claim embedded in there about what the founding principles of the country are.

Also note that his exact words were, "We are no longer just a Christian nation; We are also a Jewish nation, etc etc etc".

The hysteria over this would be hilarious if it weren't so simultaneously infuriating. That such a benign statement calls forth such henious, frothing furor from extreme right media and its consumers really shows what crazed lunatics they all have become. Thanks Hannity, thanks Rush, World Nut Daily, and Townhall... Such a spoiled, self-righteous reaction from delusional malcontents over the fact that they weren't singled out for extra special treatment, and were included as just one of the plurality of peoples in the country.... in a speech. To them, I guess... that is an insult.. that they are simply treated like the rest of us...

expat-pattaya
04-13-2009, 12:38 AM
America is NOT a Christian nation. Officially, it has no religion and allows freedom of choice.

To deny it is founded on Judeo-Christian philosophy and morals is ridiculous. Clearly the founding fathers and great majority of American at the time were Christian.

noonwitch
04-13-2009, 08:44 AM
America is NOT a Christian nation. Officially, it has no religion and allows freedom of choice.

To deny it is founded on Judeo-Christian philosophy and morals is ridiculous. Clearly the founding fathers and great majority of American at the time were Christian.



Exactly. Some secularists go overboard in trying to keep references to the religious backround out of history class, but that is silly and teaching false history. The Pilgrims did come here to escape religious persecution. People still come here to escape religious persecution in other places.

PoliCon
04-13-2009, 10:26 AM
America is NOT a Christian nation. Officially, it has no religion and allows freedom of choice.

To deny it is founded on Judeo-Christian philosophy and morals is ridiculous. Clearly the founding fathers and great majority of American at the time were Christian. The VAST majority. I think amongst the signers there is 1 jew and the rest were confessing Christians.

FlaGator
04-13-2009, 10:35 AM
The way Obama used the phrase was rhetorical... there was no claim embedded in there about what the founding principles of the country are.

Also note that his exact words were, "We are no longer just a Christian nation; We are also a Jewish nation, etc etc etc".

The hysteria over this would be hilarious if it weren't so simultaneously infuriating. That such a benign statement calls forth such henious, frothing furor from extreme right media and its consumers really shows what crazed lunatics they all have become. Thanks Hannity, thanks Rush, World Nut Daily, and Townhall... Such a spoiled, self-righteous reaction from delusional malcontents over the fact that they weren't singled out for extra special treatment, and were included as just one of the plurality of peoples in the country.... in a speech. To them, I guess... that is an insult.. that they are simply treated like the rest of us...

Not like all those other spoiled, self-righeous groups who demand to be singled out and receive special treatment from the government. Those are ok, but don't let those Christians ask for special treatment (which they don't) because... well that wouldn't be fair.

expat-pattaya
04-13-2009, 07:35 PM
Exactly. Some secularists go overboard in trying to keep references to the religious backround out of history class, but that is silly and teaching false history. The Pilgrims did come here to escape religious persecution. People still come here to escape religious persecution in other places.

I find the entire religion debate funny. I mean, I am basically an athiest, yet I don't feel persecuted if I see crosses on the highway. Or if I see in God we trust on the currency.

The USA has been around for 200+ years and no one has ever been forced to adopt a religious position. And, if the majority want to have Christmas festivities they damn well ought to be able to call it Christmas not "Happy Holidays" :D

PoliCon
04-14-2009, 05:28 PM
I find the entire religion debate funny. I mean, I am basically an athiest, yet I don't feel persecuted if I see crosses on the highway. Or if I see in God we trust on the currency.

The USA has been around for 200+ years and no one has ever been forced to adopt a religious position. And, if the majority want to have Christmas festivities they damn well ought to be able to call it Christmas not "Happy Holidays" :D

But you see the problem. While there is no concerted effort to force religion on people - there IS a concerted effort to force irreligion on people. :( Dawkins and Newdow being prime examples.

wilbur
04-14-2009, 08:55 PM
But you see the problem. While there is no concerted effort to force religion on people - there IS a concerted effort to force irreligion on people. :( Dawkins and Newdow being prime examples.

There's a concerted effort to knock religion off its vaulted pedestal as an institution thats taboo to criticize..

And given that religion cannot defend itself rationally at all, except to appeal to emotion and fear, its about damn time.

FlaGator
04-14-2009, 09:43 PM
There's a concerted effort to knock religion off its vaulted pedestal as an institution thats taboo to criticize..

And given that religion cannot defend itself rationally at all, except to appeal to emotion and fear, its about damn time.

But that effort will fail has it has in every country it has been tried.

expat-pattaya
04-14-2009, 10:17 PM
But you see the problem. While there is no concerted effort to force religion on people - there IS a concerted effort to force irreligion on people. :( Dawkins and Newdow being prime examples.

What I see is an over-reaction to the fact that Chistianity is embedded in our culture. Christmas being a prime example.

But the deal is - it is OK if you don't celebrate it. No one is forced. And, if you are born here how scary can it be? If you are emigrating and don't like it - go home.

Yes, there is an effort to decouple America from its past. Whatever.

PoliCon
04-14-2009, 10:47 PM
There's a concerted effort to knock religion off its vaulted pedestal as an institution thats taboo to criticize..

And given that religion cannot defend itself rationally at all, except to appeal to emotion and fear, its about damn time.

All I heard was farting noises. when you can pull your head out of your ass - come talk to me.

:p

PoliCon
04-14-2009, 10:50 PM
What I see is an over-reaction to the fact that Chistianity is embedded in our culture. Christmas being a prime example.

But the deal is - it is OK if you don't celebrate it. No one is forced. And, if you are born here how scary can it be? If you are emigrating and don't like it - go home.

Yes, there is an effort to decouple America from its past. Whatever.it's not just embedded - it's the weft upon which the fabric is woven. The left are hell bent on blinding people to the past because they know that the only way they can win is if the people are ignorant - especially of history.

Fergus
04-15-2009, 08:19 AM
I find the entire religion debate funny. I mean, I am basically an athiest, yet I don't feel persecuted if I see crosses on the highway. Or if I see in God we trust on the currency.

The USA has been around for 200+ years and no one has ever been forced to adopt a religious position. And, if the majority want to have Christmas festivities they damn well ought to be able to call it Christmas not "Happy Holidays" :D

I'm not offended by religion in society either, but I have to disagree with you in that I think Christianity is forced upon me. For example, I have no problem with Christmas, Easter and church on Saturday or Sunday, but I do have a problem with being forced to say that I believe in god when I pledge allegiance to my country's flag.

Can I love my country without believing in a supernatural being? Can I tell the truth in court without being forced to chant a promise to god? And why do churches get away with tax amnesty in their property and their business? It's clear that my taxes are making up for their loss.

Sorry expat-pattaya, but Christianity is forced on us all the time here in America.

FlaGator
04-15-2009, 08:42 AM
I'm not offended by religion in society either, but I have to disagree with you in that I think Christianity is forced upon me. For example, I have no problem with Christmas, Easter and church on Saturday or Sunday, but I do have a problem with being forced to say that I believe in god when I pledge allegiance to my country's flag.

Can I love my country without believing in a supernatural being? Can I tell the truth in court without being forced to chant a promise to god? And why do churches get away with tax amnesty in their property and their business? It's clear that my taxes are making up for their loss.

Sorry expat-pattaya, but Christianity is forced on us all the time here in America.

The God in the pledge of allegiance is being used generically for the God monotheistic religions in general but I understand your point. As for court, you can ask for another oath if you are that vehemently opposed to it. But, since you don't believe in God, then isn't God just another word. If the word has no meaning for you or representive value then why does it bother you? Before I became a believer I didn't care if they made me swear to God, allah or John Wayne. The words meant nothing. The only thing that mattered was that I understood the concept that I was being required to speak the truth.

What I don't understand is how does a churches tax exempt status forcing belief on you? You would still be paying the same thing whether churches paid property taxes or not. The potential taxable holdings of churches is not that great when compared to the total revenue generated by property taxes. Also churches pay taxes if they operate a business that is not donation based. My tithes are tax exempt but if the church runs a small business on the side to make money that is not tax exempt. For example a church in my home town runs a business where they rent those inflatable children's party toys to people having birthday parties and what have you. They pay income tax on all the revenue generated by the business and they pay employee taxes and the employees pay income taxex. Also, my priest pays income tax on the money he is paid by the church and he pays property taxes on the home that he owns.

lacarnut
04-15-2009, 12:22 PM
I'm not offended by religion in society either, but I have to disagree with you in that I think Christianity is forced upon me. For example, I have no problem with Christmas, Easter and church on Saturday or Sunday, but I do have a problem with being forced to say that I believe in god when I pledge allegiance to my country's flag.

Can I love my country without believing in a supernatural being? Can I tell the truth in court without being forced to chant a promise to god? And why do churches get away with tax amnesty in their property and their business? It's clear that my taxes are making up for their loss.

Sorry expat-pattaya, but Christianity is forced on us all the time here in America.

When is the last time you were forced to say the Pledge Allegiance to the Flag or chanting a promise to God. Unless you are in court on a regular basis, I call your little story a pile of horse shit and registers 1/32 of 1 on the bong meter.

FYI, I don't like a bunch of taxes that go to entities that I disaprove of like the funding to ACORN or funding to the ACLU, Arts, 4 or 5 times more funding to AIDS than Cancer, etc. etc. I could name a shitpot more but even you should get the idea.
Unfortunately, we do not get to pick and chose where our taxes go; that's just the way the mop flops.

PoliCon
04-15-2009, 12:47 PM
I'm not offended by religion in society either, but I have to disagree with you in that I think Christianity is forced upon me. For example, I have no problem with Christmas, Easter and church on Saturday or Sunday, but I do have a problem with being forced to say that I believe in god when I pledge allegiance to my country's flag.

Can I love my country without believing in a supernatural being? Can I tell the truth in court without being forced to chant a promise to god? And why do churches get away with tax amnesty in their property and their business? It's clear that my taxes are making up for their loss.

Sorry expat-pattaya, but Christianity is forced on us all the time here in America.
You are not required to swear on the bible unless it is your choice. :rolleyes: There are other options available. Further you are not required to say the pledge - or to say the under God when you recite the pledge.

Fergus
04-15-2009, 02:16 PM
When is the last time you were forced to say the Pledge Allegiance to the Flag or chanting a promise to God. Unless you are in court on a regular basis, I call your little story a pile of horse shit and registers 1/32 of 1 on the bong meter.

FYI, I don't like a bunch of taxes that go to entities that I disaprove of like the funding to ACORN or funding to the ACLU, Arts, 4 or 5 times more funding to AIDS than Cancer, etc. etc. I could name a shitpot more but even you should get the idea.
Unfortunately, we do not get to pick and chose where our taxes go; that's just the way the mop flops.

Well, you got me on the swearing in thing. I've never been a witness in trial. But you missed my point, if I did have to swear to tell the truth in a court I was under the impression that I had to swear it in front of god. I guess I don't have to do that so I retract that statement.

But on the other point, I say the Pledge of Allegiance at least once a month and if I had it my way it would happen a lot more than that. Personally I think the Pledge should be said at the beginning of all sporting events, government meetings, et cetera. That doesn't happen and I think that's sad. But anyway, to use your terminology, I think believing in superstitious puff of smoke, (god and the baby Jesus), is a pile of horseshit and in today's America I have a right to believe that just as you have the right wave your Bible around and tell me what a vile person I am. My problem is when you think you have the right to force me to believe in your version of god, which I don't and never will.

In short, the phrase "under god" needs to be taken out of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Keep god out of goverment.

lacarnut
04-15-2009, 09:56 PM
Well, you got me on the swearing in thing. I've never been a witness in trial. But you missed my point, if I did have to swear to tell the truth in a court I was under the impression that I had to swear it in front of god. I guess I don't have to do that so I retract that statement.

But on the other point, I say the Pledge of Allegiance at least once a month and if I had it my way it would happen a lot more than that. Personally I think the Pledge should be said at the beginning of all sporting events, government meetings, et cetera. That doesn't happen and I think that's sad. But anyway, to use your terminology, I think believing in superstitious puff of smoke, (god and the baby Jesus), is a pile of horseshit and in today's America I have a right to believe that just as you have the right wave your Bible around and tell me what a vile person I am. My problem is when you think you have the right to force me to believe in your version of god, which I don't and never will.

In short, the phrase "under god" needs to be taken out of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Keep god out of goverment.

So, who forces you to say the Pledge of Allegiance? Are you a politician?

The S.C. has ruled the phrase "under god" should stay in the Pledge. Tough shit if you do not like it. I don't think anyone is waving a Bible around you; if you think you are a vile person, that is your problem. My problem is people like you that have such a hatred of religion. I believe in live and let live so I don't understand the madness you have against people that do believe in God. You are far outnumbered in that respect. Once again, I call bullshit to your little story about me or others forcing you to believe in my version of God.

Evidently you have never been to an AA meeting. The word God means different things to different people in that setting. Even people that are atheists do not have a problem with the word God. Looks like your hatred is going to eat you alive.