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View Full Version : Are You an ‘Extremist’? (Thomas Sowell)



megimoo
04-21-2009, 12:13 AM
http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | While the rest of us may be worried about violent Mexican drug gangs on our border, or about terrorists who are going to be released from Guantanimo, the Director of Homeland Security is worried about "right-wing extremists."

Just who are these right-wing extremists?


According to an official document of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, right-wing extremists include "groups and individuals that are dedicated to a single issue, such as opposition to abortion or immigration." It also includes those "rejecting federal authority in favor of state or local authority."


If you fit into any of these categories, you may not have realized that you are considered a threat to national security. But apparently the Obama administration has its eye on you.

According to the same official document, the Department of Homeland Security "has no specific information that domestic rightwing terrorists are currently planning acts of violence." But somehow they just know that you right-wingers are itching to unleash terror somewhere, somehow.

So-called "honor killings" by Muslims in the United States, including a recent beheading of his wife by a leader of one of the American Muslim organizations, does not seem to arouse any concern by the Department of Homeland Security.

When it comes to the thuggery of ACORN — its members harassing the homes of bankers and even the home of Senator Phil Gramm when he opposed things that ACORN favored — the Department of Homeland Security apparently sees no evil, hears no evil and speaks no evil.

http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/sowell042109.php3

patriot45
04-21-2009, 10:51 AM
Good one Moo, I like Dr. Sowell! But now I'm going into hiding! :D


If you fit into any of these categories, you may not have realized that you are considered a threat to national security. But apparently the Obama administration has its eye on you

I gotta go now, Agent Mike is at the door!:cool:

megimoo
04-21-2009, 12:10 PM
.Random Thoughts (Thomas Sowell)

I am so old that I can remember when music was musical.

Now that the federal government says that it will stand behind the warranties on General Motors' automobiles, does that make you more likely or less likely to buy a car from GM? If you were a rising young executive with a promising future, would you be more likely or less likely to go to work for a company where politicians can fire you?


We have become such suckers for words that politicians can spend our tax money like a drunken sailor, provided they call it "investment." At least the drunken sailor is spending his own money but people look down on him because he doesn't call it "investment."

Barack Obama seems determined to repeat every disastrous mistake of the 1930s, at home and abroad. He has already repeated Herbert Hoover's policy of raising taxes on high income earners, FDR's policy of trying to micro-manage the economy and Neville Chamberlain's policy of seeking dialogues with hostile nations while downplaying the dangers they represent.

We seem to be moving steadily in the direction of a society where no one is responsible for what he himself did but we are all responsible for what somebody else did, either in the present or in the past.

The famous editorial cartoonist Herblock could write as well as draw. In one of his books, he said something like: "You too can have the soothing feeling of nature's own baby-soft wool being pulled gently over your resting eyes." I think of that every time I see Barack Obama talking.

It has long been said that uncertainty is the hardest thing for a market to adjust to. No one can generate uncertainty as much as the government, which can change the rules in midstream or come out with some new bright idea at any time, as the current administration has already demonstrated.

http://townhall.com/Columnists/ThomasSowell/2009/04/07/random_thoughts

megimoo
04-21-2009, 12:38 PM
Mind-changing Books (Thomas Sowell)

From time to time, readers ask me what books have made the biggest difference in my life. I am not sure how to answer that question because the books that happened to set me off in a particular direction at a particular time may have no profound or valuable message for others— and can even be books I no longer believe in today.

The first book that got me interested in political issues was Actions and Passions by Max Lerner, which I read at age 19. It was a collection of his newspaper columns, none of which I remember today and all of which were vintage liberalism, which even Max Lerner himself apparently had second thoughts about in his later years.

The writings of Karl Marx— especially The Communist Manifesto— had the longest lasting effect on me as a young man and led me to become and remain a Marxist throughout my twenties. I wouldn't recommend The Communist Manifesto today either, except as an example of a masterpiece of propaganda.

There was no book that changed my mind about being on the political left. Life experience did that— especially the experience of seeing government at work from the inside.

The book that permanently made me a sadder— and, hopefully, wiser— man was Edward Gibbons' The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. To follow one of the greatest civilizations of all time as it degenerated and fractured, even before being torn apart by its enemies, was especially painful in view of the parallels to what is happening in America in our own times.

The fall of the Roman Empire was not just a matter of changing rulers or political systems. It was the collapse of a whole civilization— the destruction of an economy, the breakdown of law and order, the disappearance of many educational institutions.

It has been estimated that a thousand years passed before the standard of living in Western Europe rose again to the level it had once had back in Roman times. How long would it take to recover from the collapse of Western civilization today— if we ever recovered?

The kinds of books most readers seem to have in mind when they ask for my recommendations are books that go to the heart of a particular subject, books that open the eyes of the reader in a mind-changing way.

James Q. Wilson's books on crime are like that, shattering the illusions of the intelligentsia about "root causes," "prevention" programs, "rehabilitation," and other trendy nonsense. Professor Wilson's books are a strong dose of hard facts that counter mushy rhetoric.

Peter Bauer's books on economic development demolish many myths about the causes of poverty in the Third World— and about "foreign aid" as a way of relieving that poverty. The last of these books was the best, Equality, the Third World and Economic Delusion.


http://www.creators.com/opinion/thomas-sowell/mind-changing-books.html

megimoo
04-21-2009, 07:31 PM
http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | China is the largest foreign holder of U.S. government bonds. But, instead of buying more of those bonds as our skyrocketing national debt leads to more bonds being issued, China has been selling some of its U.S. government bonds this year.

The Chinese are no fools. They know that all this unbridled spending — even when it is called "investment" — means that inflation is coming. That in turn means that the dollars with which U.S. government bonds will be paid off will be worth a lot less than the dollars with which the bonds were bought.

Governments around the world have played this game for centuries, robbing those who trusted them enough to buy their bonds. Like Bernard Madoff, they call it "investment."

Inflation also means that all the talk about how higher taxes will be confined to "the rich" is nonsense. Inflation is a hidden tax that takes away the value of money held by everyone at every income level.


Abraham Lincoln once asked an audience how many legs a dog has if you count the tail as a leg. When they answered "five," Lincoln told them that the answer was four. The fact that you called the tail a leg did not make it a leg.


It is too bad that Lincoln is not still around today. He might emancipate us all from our enslavement to words.


When you call something a "stimulus" package, that does not mean that it actually stimulates. The way individuals, banks and businesses in general are hanging onto their money suggests that "sedative" package might be more accurate.


This is not a new phenomenon, peculiar to this administration. President Bush's "stimulus" package did not stimulate either. The same was true back in the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "pump-priming" by spending government money to get private money flowing.


http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/sowell041409.php3
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THE RESISTANCE
04-21-2009, 09:26 PM
There are two much more important questions,

Are you really conservative or do you cling to a few pieces as if from a puzzle, instead of being the picture.
For that is why it has slipped and is slipping away, half -a88ing always fosters half-a88 results.

And the biggest question is,

" WHY ARE YOU NOT...A RIGHT WING EXTREMIST!"

The originators of our liberties, the authors of our freedoms were!


^^^^^^^^^^^

Water Closet
04-22-2009, 07:56 AM
There are two much more important questions,

Are you really conservative or do you cling to a few pieces as if from a puzzle, instead of being the picture.
For that is why it has slipped and is slipping away, half -a88ing always fosters half-a88 results.

And the biggest question is,

" WHY ARE YOU NOT...A RIGHT WING EXTREMIST!"

The originators of our liberties, the authors of our freedoms were!


^^^^^^^^^^^

Your post raises several interesting points. First, why do people resent being called an "extremist?" There have been several threads regarding online assessments of the political spectrum in which posters have revelled in how extremely conservative they can be, as if it were a contest to be more and more conservative. In the most recent of these (http://www.conservativeunderground.com/forum505/showthread.php?t=13424&highlight=progressive), with a range from 1-440 with the lower numbers being more conservative, the thread became a veritable exercise in "how low can ya' go." Yet, if I were to call any of the posters an extremist, they would take great offense. Perhaps it's analogous to blacks and the "n word?"

Second, your term "right wing extremist" has a whole lot of connotations today that I'm not sure the founding fathers would agree with. For example, how would Jefferson or Franklin feel about the "War on Drugs," violations of habaes corpus, the mixing science and religion in classrooms, massive police stings to round up prostitutes? I'm not sure that modern "right wing extremism" corresponds that closely with the attitudes of the founding fasthers.

THE RESISTANCE
04-22-2009, 07:30 PM
Since we have not had close to a Supreme Court since the early thirtys, then the simple answer is the 9th and 10th admendment.