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stsinner
06-11-2009, 01:08 PM
Astounding.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Obama administration is taking a half-step toward taming U.S. executive pay. Some lawmakers prefer a fuller stride.


Democrats on the House Financial Services Committee said Thursday the administration's efforts to hector the private sector into reining in executive pay might not go far enough.

The administration contends that excessive compensation contributed to the U.S. financial crisis, but rejects direct intervention in corporate pay decisions.

Instead, the administration plans to seek legislation that would try to rein in compensation at publicly traded companies through nonbinding shareholder votes and less management influence on pay decisions.

"I do differ with the administration in that hope springs eternal and their position seems to be that if we strengthen the compensation committees we will do better," said the committee chairman, Rep. Barney Frank, a Democrat.

Rep. Brad Sherman, a Democrat, said that instead of giving shareholders a nonbinding voice on pay, their votes should be binding on boards of directors.

Democrats and administration officials agreed that companies across the private sector need to adjust compensation practices to avoid damaging the economy.

Gene Sperling, a counselor to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, said administration guidelines call on all publicly held companies to link compensation to long-term performance, not short-term gains.

"We believe that compensation practices must be better aligned with long-term value and prudent risk management at all firms, and not just for the financial services industry," Sperling said.

The committee also heard from officials from the Federal Reserve and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

While the administration has approached the issue with caution, a top Republican said the plans amounted to "incessant government intervention."

"The president cannot continue his heavy-handed meddling in the private sector and expect it to function, much less flourish," said Rep. Tom Price, chairman of the Republican Study Committee.

Alabama Rep. Spencer Bachus, the top Republican on the committee, added: "We need to get government out of businesses."

The administration has drawn a sharp line between the overall corporate world and those institutions that have tapped the government's $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program.

On Wednesday, it set pay limits on companies that receive TARP assistance, with the toughest restrictions aimed at seven recipients of "exceptional assistance." They are Citigroup Inc., Bank of America Corp., General Motors Corp., Chrysler LLC, American International Group Inc., GMAC LLC and Chrysler Financial.

The regulations limit top executives of companies that receive TARP funds to bonuses of no more than one-third of their annual salaries.

The administration named Kenneth Feinberg, a lawyer who oversaw payments to families of Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack victims, as a "special master" with power to reject pay plans he deems excessive at the seven companies with the biggest injections of public money. Feinberg also would have authority to review compensation for the top 100 salaried employees at those companies.

lacarnut
06-11-2009, 03:11 PM
None of the talking heads in the Democ. would say what the pay cap would be. Maxine Waters said we are still studying it and that there would be no caps. Of course I believe her about as much as I believe the Magic Negro. We now have 16 czars from pay czars to auto czars to bank czars. Dumb ass Obama appoints a 31 year old law student to become head of the car czar. This dip shit wannabe 2 bit lawyer admits he does not know beans about the car industry.

stsinner
06-11-2009, 03:47 PM
The government has absolutely no right or business when it comes to private institutions!! Period!!

blueyonder
06-11-2009, 05:05 PM
I think the libs should go after:
movie stars...then price of movies would go down
sports players..then ticket prices would go down
News men (and women) then advertising fees would go down and product prices would go down
The list could go on and on

lacarnut
06-11-2009, 06:59 PM
I think the libs should go after:
movie stars...then price of movies would go down
sports players..then ticket prices would go down
News men (and women) then advertising fees would go down and product prices would go down
The list could go on and on

Don't forget politicians in DC. Cut their salaries in half cause they are only in session about 3/4 the time. Then during re-election year, it's more like 1/2 or less of the time.

hazlnut
06-11-2009, 10:28 PM
This is actually a huge problem --


Gene Sperling, a counselor to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, said administration guidelines call on all publicly held companies to link compensation to long-term performance, not short-term gains.

"We believe that compensation practices must be better aligned with long-term value and prudent risk management at all firms, and not just for the financial services industry," Sperling said.

The non-binding shareholder vote solution being suggested might have some effect, but only really puts execs on notice, it does not force them to change.

A better solution would be to not bail out any companies EVER. These huge bailouts have set a very dangerous precedent. Big companies will think it's okay too take huge risks because if it doesn't work out, then they can just claim they're too big to fail.

Let the 'free market' self-correct. We've turned into a bunch of enablers.

The one thing they should crack down on, though, is off-shore banking. You get rich in this country, you bank and invest in this country.

Also, make tax incentives available to successful companies. Why are we propping up GM. Ford paid back the money!! They're doing something right!! Reward them, not the companies that got it wrong.

Teetop
06-11-2009, 10:53 PM
This is actually a huge problem --



The non-binding shareholder vote solution being suggested might have some effect, but only really puts execs on notice, it does not force them to change.

A better solution would be to not bail out any companies EVER. These huge bailouts have set a very dangerous precedent. Big companies will think it's okay too take huge risks because if it doesn't work out, then they can just claim they're too big to fail.

Let the 'free market' self-correct. We've turned into a bunch of enablers.

The one thing they should crack down on, though, is off-shore banking. You get rich in this country, you bank and invest in this country.

Also, make tax incentives available to successful companies. Why are we propping up GM. Ford paid back the money!! They're doing something right!! Reward them, not the companies that got it wrong.


A better solution would be to not bail out any companies EVER. No shit.


From California? Let the free market "self-correct".....


How can it? With SnObama's input into it?

Most currupt congress ever.

hazlnut
06-18-2009, 12:03 PM
No shit.


From California? Let the free market "self-correct".....


How can it? With SnObama's input into it?

Most currupt congress ever.

I'm not the Gov. We're working on it.

We could use some more INS agents.