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View Full Version : Do you engage protestors?



Phillygirl
06-14-2009, 06:22 PM
I like to. Sometimes I have the time. Sometimes I don't. This weekend, in NYC, there were 2 911 "Truthers" handing out pamphlets. I had an 8 year old with me, so I didn't think it appropriate to really engage. But I just looked at the guy and said "you know, they really did fly planes into the buildings that day." My niece wanted to know what the discussion was all about, but I figured I'd leave the details to the parents.

Soo...do you engage or just walk by and roll your eyes?

Shannon
06-14-2009, 06:39 PM
I punch them. Sometimes I kick them. It depends on the shoes I'm wearing.

Bubba Dawg
06-14-2009, 06:40 PM
No. Not while they are in protest mode.

I will engage people of differing political stripes on particular issues. I have a habit of arguing against whatever a person may be saying, even if I happen to agree with him/her, just because I am typically a contrarian.

Bubba Dawg
06-14-2009, 06:41 PM
I punch them. Sometimes I kick them. It depends on the shoes I'm wearing.

I'd run if you tried to kick me with your size tens. :eek:

Rockntractor
06-14-2009, 06:43 PM
I'd run if you tried to kick me with your size tens. :eek:
My gawd size tens. She could waterski barefoot.

Shannon
06-14-2009, 06:44 PM
I'd run if you tried to kick me with your size tens. :eek:

Philly is the sasquatch, not me. I wouldn't kick you. I would just shoot you.

Now, stop trying to jack the thread.

Bubba Dawg
06-14-2009, 06:50 PM
Philly is the sasquatch, not me. I wouldn't kick you. I would just shoot you.

Now, stop trying to jack the thread.

9 1/2 ?

Rockntractor
06-14-2009, 06:52 PM
9 1/2 ?
She could walk on water if she got a run at it.

Bubba Dawg
06-14-2009, 06:59 PM
The thing about protestors is that they typically are not in a mode that makes two way communication possible. Frequently they have a circled-wagons mentality that precludes real dialogue. This is expecially the case if there are counter-demonstrators present.

The us-vs-them is usually firmly in place.

Plus, if these are 9/11 Truthers, do you think that they could be convinced of anything contrary to the flavor Kool Aid they've already drunk?

Shannon
06-14-2009, 07:07 PM
The thing about protestors is that they typically are not in a mode that makes two way communication possible. Frequently they have a circled-wagons mentality that precludes real dialogue. This is expecially the case if there are counter-demonstrators present.

The us-vs-them is usually firmly in place.

Plus, if these are 9/11 Truthers, do you think that they could be convinced of anything contrary to the flavor Kool Aid they've already drunk?

That's why it's best just to punch them.

Bubba Dawg
06-14-2009, 07:20 PM
That's why it's best just to punch them.

Perhaps that punch would act as a swift spiritual kick in the head that could alter their sense of reality forever. You would, in that sense, be the Tool of the Universe and would be a significant part of the mechanism that serves to bring enlightenment to that person.

This could be your Higher Calling, Grasshopper......

lotus blossoms....

Elspeth
06-14-2009, 07:39 PM
That's why it's best just to punch them.

But what if you're wearing stilettos? :cool:

Teetop
06-14-2009, 08:13 PM
I like to. Sometimes I have the time. Sometimes I don't. This weekend, in NYC, there were 2 911 "Truthers" handing out pamphlets. I had an 8 year old with me, so I didn't think it appropriate to really engage. But I just looked at the guy and said "you know, they really did fly planes into the buildings that day." My niece wanted to know what the discussion was all about, but I figured I'd leave the details to the parents.

Soo...do you engage or just walk by and roll your eyes?

Where I live? People laugh their asses off at the moonbat. Ridicule them the rest of the night. Make thier life miserable as long as possible... :D

Disclaimer; I live in a town with a population of about 3,500. But, we would give the moonbat plenty of hell....

AlmostThere
06-14-2009, 09:05 PM
I punch them. Sometimes I kick them. It depends on the shoes I'm wearing.

Shannon, I swear, you are always good for a laugh.

MrsSmith
06-14-2009, 09:20 PM
I actually saw one batch of 9-11 truther protesters - a group of 4 or 5 people. I might have engaged them, but they looked pretty unhappy already, kind of hiding behind one big sign...and I was laughing too hard to turn the car around and go back. :D:D:D

Jumpy
06-14-2009, 09:50 PM
I never have confronted them and I probably never will, outside of frowning at them or flipping them the bird. (kidding) . I think it is cool when well spoken/informed people do confront protesters in a nice way. Its good to challenge them.

Phillygirl
06-15-2009, 01:18 PM
I never have confronted them and I probably never will, outside of frowning at them or flipping them the bird. (kidding) . I think it is cool when well spoken/informed people do confront protesters in a nice way. Its good to challenge them.

I've done that as well. When the Iraq war started, every Friday there were protestors in my town at a corner I passed by to go to lunch. I would periodically engage them. They didn't like it.

Once, however, there was a rather large (by my town's standards) anti-war demonstration (it was really more of a festival...booths, music, etc.). I had been to Happy Hour earlier in the night and decided that I would have some fun with them. It involved filling out their survey. However, they didn't actually have surveys to hand out, instead just a giant poster board with their questions on it for effect. I asked if I could take the survey and wrote my answers on their board. I think I scared them a bit. But one guy decided he would be the big brave mouthpiece and started spouting off about how he wanted to move to Canada. His wife quietly led him away after I pulled out my checkbook, asked him for his full name, so that I could give him a check for his moving expenses. I had been out with a group of attorneys earlier in the night. One of them called our friend who is vehemently liberal and represents the police department in the town. My friend was concerned that I was going to be arrested and wanted to make certain our other friend would get me out quickly. All in all a fun night.

stsinner
06-15-2009, 02:37 PM
It's all just a waste of time.. I've never seen someone successfully influence the thinking of another person, even in polite conversation. People just seem to believe what they believe. Seems to me the only time people change their positions is when they open their minds and read something or watch something of make some other observation on their own and of their own volition that makes sense to them. Then they just seem to emerge from their house the next day with a new opinion and thought pattern.

Take the Obama voters, for example-the man has proven beyond any doubt that he's a Socialist and intends to socialize America, all the while saying it's temporary, and they still love him. Some of his voters loved that he said he'd end wire-tapping during the campaign, but he then signed it into law after being elected, and they still love him.. He literally can do no wrong in their eyes. Even in the face of facts they still swoon for the man. There is clearly no coherent, reasonable consideration being made of his actions and performance since being elected.

Phillygirl
06-15-2009, 02:45 PM
It's all just a waste of time.. I've never seen someone successfully influence the thinking of another person, even in polite conversation. People just seem to believe what they believe. Seems to me the only time people change their positions is when they open their minds and read something or watch something of make some other observation on their own and of their own volition that makes sense to them. Then they just seem to emerge from their house the next day with a new opinion and thought pattern.

Take the Obama voters, for example-the man has proven beyond any doubt that he's a Socialist and intends to socialize America, all the while saying it's temporary, and they still love him. Some of his voters loved that he said he'd end wire-tapping during the campaign, but he then signed it into law after being elected, and they still love him.. He literally can do no wrong in their eyes. Even in the face of facts they still swoon for the man. There is clearly no coherent, reasonable consideration being made of his actions and performance since being elected.

Meh, I do it for my own entertainment, not because I expect to change their minds.

Odysseus
06-15-2009, 04:21 PM
I like to. Sometimes I have the time. Sometimes I don't. This weekend, in NYC, there were 2 911 "Truthers" handing out pamphlets. I had an 8 year old with me, so I didn't think it appropriate to really engage. But I just looked at the guy and said "you know, they really did fly planes into the buildings that day." My niece wanted to know what the discussion was all about, but I figured I'd leave the details to the parents.
Soo...do you engage or just walk by and roll your eyes?

It depends. If I'm in uniform, I try to be low-key. If I get into an argument in public, the next day's media headlines won't read "Leftwing Idiot Gets Well-Deserved Ridicule From Troop." It sucks, but that's the way that it is. Besides, they rarely protest except when they have a numerical advantage.

Once, though, I went for a run in my PT uniform and ended up in Times Square in the middle of one of the protests against Desert Storm. I was jogging along and ended up behind a group of morons carrying a paper-mache coffin and dressed as specters of death. When I couldn't pass them on the sidewalk, I came up behind them and shouted, "Make Way!" They dropped the coffin and turned around, startled. "I said, Make Way!" They split like the Red Sea and I jogged right up the middle. Cowards.

Phillygirl
06-15-2009, 05:01 PM
It depends. If I'm in uniform, I try to be low-key. If I get into an argument in public, the next day's media headlines won't read "Leftwing Idiot Gets Well-Deserved Ridicule From Troop." It sucks, but that's the way that it is. Besides, they rarely protest except when they have a numerical advantage.

Once, though, I went for a run in my PT uniform and ended up in Times Square in the middle of one of the protests against Desert Storm. I was jogging along and ended up behind a group of morons carrying a paper-mache coffin and dressed as specters of death. When I couldn't pass them on the sidewalk, I came up behind them and shouted, "Make Way!" They dropped the coffin and turned around, startled. "I said, Make Way!" They split like the Red Sea and I jogged right up the middle. Cowards.

I'm surprised they knew what "Make Way" meant. But you're right, I'll bet you scared the bejeezus out of them. I don't blame you for the low key when in uniform. You're in a no win situation there, unfortunately.

Zafod
06-15-2009, 05:41 PM
if I could get away with it I would kick em in the junk.

FlaGator
06-15-2009, 05:44 PM
I was engaged to a protester once but she dumped me at the altar. She apparently misunderstood me when I told her I was a Protestant.

hazlnut
06-15-2009, 05:55 PM
I usually give the peace sign to people supporting a military action and half of the peace sign to folks protesting a military action.:)

I give sun block to flag wavers, and a bucket of water to flag burners. (safety first)

I generally don't like protesters who use giant stick puppets in protests. Unless they are protesting a puppet regime.

I don't care for people who protest moments of silence by talking. Although, I do sometimes talk during a bad movie--protesting bad filmmaking.

I still don't understand how Anarchists 'organize' their protests. Who is in charge? When anarchists form a committee to discuss the upcoming protest, take up a collection, nominate someone to go to Home Depot and buy the paint...I can't take them seriously as anarchists.;)

Constitutionally Speaking
06-15-2009, 09:16 PM
I like to. Sometimes I have the time. Sometimes I don't. This weekend, in NYC, there were 2 911 "Truthers" handing out pamphlets. I had an 8 year old with me, so I didn't think it appropriate to really engage. But I just looked at the guy and said "you know, they really did fly planes into the buildings that day." My niece wanted to know what the discussion was all about, but I figured I'd leave the details to the parents.

Soo...do you engage or just walk by and roll your eyes?

Depends on several factors, whether I have the time, what kind of mood I am in etc.


I once delivered coffee to some recruiters who's office was being blockaded by the protesters. As I went to enter the office, two jerks pushed the door shut and the handle of the door broke off in my hands.

I also copied a Protest Warrior sign once, took it to a demonstration and passed out a fact sheet on Saddam's atrocities. This "confrontation" was my favorite though because one of the leaders gave me the bullshit story we have all heard (and debunked) of Bush's Hitler connections. I (of course had done my research and embarrassed the guy in front of his flock) Before the end of the protest he was saying WWII was about corporate American evil. Many in the crowd were definitely distancing themselves from him before the end.


( I know I didn't start it with so, and no one jumped out of the Bushes, but hey.)

Rockntractor
06-15-2009, 09:20 PM
I still don't understand how Anarchists 'organize' their protests. Who is in charge? When anarchists form a committee to discuss the upcoming protest, take up a collection, nominate someone to go to Home Depot and buy the paint...I can't take them seriously as anarchists.
Very good!