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megimoo
07-05-2009, 09:45 PM
Unearthed and passed on to me by a reader, herewith is the 8th Grade Final Exam from Salina, Kansas 1895.
Anyone who doubts the sorry state of the education provided by our government school system should take a stab... oops, that is violent... try their hand at answering these questions. TYSK (thanks again, Robert B.)

[See additional information added March 2001]

In 1895 the 8th grade was considered upper level education. Many children quit school as soon as they could master the basic fundamentals of the 3 R's (reading, writing and arithmetic). Most never went past the 3rd or 4th grade. That's all you needed for the farm and most city jobs. Child labor laws were not in existence yet.

Additionally today's education has much more focus on technology and sociology than the grammar and geography of old. It's a different world with different requirements and capabilities needed to succeed.

Could You Have Passed the 8th Grade in 1895?:

This is the eighth grade final exam from 1895 given in Salina, KS. It was taken from the original document on file at the Smoky Valley Genealogical Society and Library in Salina, KS and reprinted by the Salina Journal.

http://www.tysknews.com/Depts/Educate/8th_grade_final_exam.htm

Elspeth
07-05-2009, 10:53 PM
Could You Have Passed the 8th Grade in 1895?:

This is the eighth grade final exam from 1895 given in Salina, KS. It was taken from the original document on file at the Smoky Valley Genealogical Society and Library in Salina, KS and reprinted by the Salina Journal.

http://www.tysknews.com/Depts/Educate/8th_grade_final_exam.htm[/I]

Wow. Especially this:

5. Define Case, Illustrate each Case.

"case" (as in objective, subjective, possessive etc.) actually goes back to Latin grammar, which was superimposed on English grammar. Not that it was a bad thing, it's just that no one talks about "case" really anymore, unless you are teaching pronouns (I, me, my), and I don't even think the word "case" is used even then.

What an interesting test. And how few of our 8th graders could pass it.

This is the clincher though:


Bear in mind that these students (or their teachers) were expected to know how to figure mortgage and loan interest. Today even college graduates have difficulty figuring the correct change for a purchase of $7.59 paid with a ten-dollar bill. Most cannot tell you that a discount of 25% is equal to the mark-up of 33-1/3%

Amazing.