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View Full Version : Whirlpool to send 1,100 jobs to MEXICO, shut plant in Indiana



aka:PBS
08-30-2009, 10:17 AM
Vinnie From Indy (1000+ posts) Sun Aug-30-09 09:11 AM
Original message
Whirlpool to send 1,100 jobs to MEXICO, shut plant in Indiana - Wake Up America!
Advertisements [?]No jobs - no recovery! I hope all Americans understand that this recession is different than any other in our history. Companies like Whirlpool and others no longer need American workers. These jobs that are leaving are not coming back. While global corporations jumping around the globe to find the cheapest labor at all costs is hardly new, it is unforgivable that our government makes it easy and sometimes even provides incentives to move jobs out of the US.

Programs like "cash to clunkers" are simply temporary shots of adrenaline for our economy. I predict that sales of autos will again drop and put increasing pressure on US manufacturers. It does not seem like rocket science to understand that Americans without work will not be able to buy cars or washer & dryers etc.

Ross Perot was right! NAFTA, CAFTA and other agreements are creating a giant sucking sound as jobs are whisked out of the US for points around the globe.

************************************************** ****

INDIANAPOLIS — Whirlpool Corp. said Friday it will cut 1,100 jobs and close a refrigerator factory in Evansville, Ind., to trim excess production capacity by next year.

Whirlpool will move the production of refrigerators with freezers on top to a company location in Mexico. Ice makers produced in Evansville will be moved to a yet-to-be-decided location.

The jobs will be eliminated in mid-2010. The Benton Harbor, Mich.-based appliance maker has aggressively cut costs as demand for big-ticket items has shrunk in the recession.

Whirlpool spokeswoman Jill Saletta, speaking at a Friday morning press conference Webcast by Evansville television station WFIE, said the plant closing had nothing to do with worker performance.

"This decision is around cost," she said.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gqUST...


http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=show_mesg&forum=389&topic_id=6423894&mesg_id=6423894

But I thought when obama got elected that no jobs would be cut...and that all americans would be working? what is happening here?


Peacetrain (1000+ posts) Sun Aug-30-09 09:18 AM
Response to Original message
4. This is why the stimulus was and is so important... to get jobs
rebuilding our infrastructure going. Also green jobs that cannot be exported.

Carol
08-30-2009, 12:57 PM
Just read the bold parts if you want to.
kentuck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Journal Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to add this author to your Ignore list Sun Aug-30-09 09:13 AM
Response to Original message
1. Why? Updated at 8:56 AM

They are not making enough money for their stockholders? And that is of paramount importance, right?
exboyfil (464 posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to add this author to your Ignore list Sun Aug-30-09 10:15 AM
Response to Reply #4
21. Sorry to say it but unless you police it these green jobs will

be exported like all the rest. Just to give you the progression:

Engineering done in India
Fabrication in China (perhaps Mexico if we are lucky)
Hauled by Mexican trucks to the U.S. warehouses
Put in place by Mexican immigrants

Does that about sum it up?We need more regulations!!!!!!!111!!!

soverywendy (12 posts)
8. You make it there ... you can't sell it here

End story. Stop letting the free traders fool you.We're going to be going without a lot of things and be unable to sell anything to other countries if soverywendy has anything to do with it.

MadHound (1000+ posts) Sun Aug-30-09 09:33 AM
Response to Original message
blah...blah.....blah...blah....This is simply another assault on the poor and middle class designed to keep labor costs down and the public in perpetual debt servitude.
Double T Sun Aug-30-09 09:45 AM
Response to Original message
13. wall street and corporate america are running our government and country.

The American economy is in the tank as we will see by the end of this year. Cost cutting including huge job reductions are the only thing fueling the criminals on wall street and in the corporate boardrooms. Many small businesses are out of business and many more will follow the same fate. The outsourcing of jobs to foreign slave wage countries will not stop. The latest recession will be 'nothing' compared to what is coming once reality sets in. Blah....blah....blah...blah......
HughMoran Donating Member (1000+ posts)
28. I'm so tired of fighting this

So often my job has been shipped overseas - and I'm a tech-pro - it's not just manufacturing jobs any more. American companies are traitors to the flag and their owners should be executed for treason. Either that or our government should have some incentives to make companies want to keep the jobs here. I think the latter is a better idea.

They demonize stock holders, CEO's, and corporations. They try..and sometimes do...interfere with the private market and limit the evil ones salaries, and they want confiscatory taxes and more and more regulations.

Then they are mad and confused when the companies go overseas.

gator
08-30-2009, 04:16 PM
Toyota is also shutting down their union run plant in California and moving the work to Texas:

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20090827/BUSINESS/908279934/1036?Title=Toyota-to-shut-down-production-at-NUMMI-plant



FREMONT, Calif. — Toyota Motor Corp. will abandon the automobile plant here in March, which will displace the facility’s 4,700 workers and unleash economic shock waves that may jeopardize 50,000 more California jobs.

Related Links:Toyota closer to shutting plant Can Sacramento save the NUMMI auto plant in Fremont? GM puts end to joint venture with Toyota Autoworkers wept and expressed shock Thursday as word filtered through the vast automobile plant about Toyota’s decision to cease production in 2010 at New United Motor Manufacturing Inc, or NUMMI.

“A lot of people are panicked about this,” said Javier Contreras, chairman of United Auto Workers Local 2244, which represents union members at the factory. “People are crying at the plant.”

At 11 a.m., Kunihiko Ogura, NUMMI’s chief executive officer, formally told employees about the decision.

“It was a very emotional meeting,” said David Warren, an Escalon resident and 18-year employee at the plant who makes dashboards. “The employees were very upset.”

The shutdown also will jolt an estimated 1,200 businesses that supply products and services for NUMMI directly, as well as indirectly to the factory’s employees.

“This is terrible,” said Michael Johnson, a Hayward, Calif., resident who provides environmental services to NUMMI on a contract basis. “I won’t have a job.”

About 50,000 jobs in California depend on the factory’s ongoing operations, according to estimates provided by NUMMI and an independent group called Friends of NUMMI.

Those companies include parts suppliers in the East Bay, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County and Southern California. In addition, restaurants and bars near the factory could suffer.

The shutdown will force NUMMI workers to ponder a future darkened by the gloom that hangs over California’s devastated economic landscape.

“A lot of people have nowhere to go,” Warren said as he left the plant. “They will have a tough time deciding what to do with their lives.”

The decision by Toyota terminates the 25-year joint venture the company had with General Motors Corp. to produce a variety of vehicles at the New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. plant in Fremont.

“The plant closing down would be devastating,” said Ron Lopez, a San Jose resident who works at the plant. “We have a beautiful home near Mount Hamilton that we will have to sell. A lot of people will have to sell their houses.”

Lopez, a UAW trustee, was a body shop welder and paint shop worker before taking his current job in safety and ergonomics.

“It’s shocking,” said Michael Krepelka, a resident of Riverbank who has worked at NUMMI for four years in parts management.

“I’m going to start putting some applications together now.”

“It’s not make or break, but it will affect us,” said Lisa Dapelo, a bartender at Kirby’s Sports Bar, which is just down the street from NUMMI. “It will be a challenge for us to reinvent ourselves. We’ll have to change some shifts.” Kirby’s opens at 6 a.m. to serve certain shifts at NUMMI.

The facility’s prospects eroded steadily after GM emerged from bankruptcy and discarded NUMMI, leaving left the Fremont factory with the remnants of the old GM. Even worse, GM jettisoned its Pontiac brand, which caused GM to cease production of the Vibe vehicle at NUMMI.

Those decisions, in turn, forced Toyota to scrutinize the financial viability of its involvement in NUMMI absent a partner. Under pressure by its new chief executive officer to return to profitability in 2010, Toyota decided to exit the auto-making venture, leaving the factory with no manufacturers.

“California joins the ranks of states adversely affected by the bankruptcy of General Motors and the worldwide collapse in demand for automobiles,” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said. “There is nothing of greater importance than to boost job and economic growth for the historic percentage of Californians who find themselves unemployed during these difficult economic times.”

Alarmed by the possible shutdown, local, state and federal political leaders scrambled to craft a package of financial incentives, including tax breaks, that they could dangle before Toyota.

“This is not over,” Lt. Gov. John Garamendi said. “The Fremont auto plant is a very viable, efficient automobile assembly plant that has a very significant supply train and supply system.”

Despite the urgency, not a single piece of legislation has been approved by state lawmakers.

“The problem is not with the legislation, the problem is with GM’s decision to push the NUMMI plant into the bankruptcy case,” Garamendi said. “We have to create extensive inducements for Toyota to stay at this plant or for some other manufacturer to come into the plant. The incentives need to be made real. Those should be done in short order.”

In a statement, U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said she was profoundly disappointed with the decision. She also said the plant had to overcome numerous difficulties, especially after Toyota began to suffer financial losses in its overall operations.

“The company had lost money, and there was not enough work to keep the plant open after GM pulled out of the joint venture following the cancellation of the Pontiac Vibe, which carried one shift,” she said.

“The plant was aging, and it couldn’t compete with Toyota’s two other plants in the South. Finally, the cost of operations was extremely high in California.”

The shutdown is part of a wrenching restructuring of the auto industry nationwide, said Stephen Levy, director of the Palo Alto-based Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.

“It’s a piece of what devastated Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky, which had auto plants, and it finally reached here,” Levy said.

Union officials believe GM must bear much of the blame for the plant’s shutdown. GM had hoped to use NUMMI to learn firsthand about Toyota’s more nimble operating techniques so GM could improve its ossified operations.

When the NUMMI plant opened in 1984, it introduced to the U.S. auto industry several cutting-edge techniques: just-in-time inventories, factory robotics and quality circles. But Contreras, the union leader, thinks GM was not a sufficiently apt student.

“GM did learn, but they didn’t learn fast enough,” he said. “We are the new generation of autoworkers. But GM was still stuck in the old ways.”

Lanie
08-30-2009, 04:31 PM
Toyota is also shutting down their union run plant in California and moving the work to Texas:

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20090827/BUSINESS/908279934/1036?Title=Toyota-to-shut-down-production-at-NUMMI-plant



FREMONT, Calif. — Toyota Motor Corp. will abandon the automobile plant here in March, which will displace the facility’s 4,700 workers and unleash economic shock waves that may jeopardize 50,000 more California jobs.

Related Links:Toyota closer to shutting plant Can Sacramento save the NUMMI auto plant in Fremont? GM puts end to joint venture with Toyota Autoworkers wept and expressed shock Thursday as word filtered through the vast automobile plant about Toyota’s decision to cease production in 2010 at New United Motor Manufacturing Inc, or NUMMI.

“A lot of people are panicked about this,” said Javier Contreras, chairman of United Auto Workers Local 2244, which represents union members at the factory. “People are crying at the plant.”

At 11 a.m., Kunihiko Ogura, NUMMI’s chief executive officer, formally told employees about the decision.

“It was a very emotional meeting,” said David Warren, an Escalon resident and 18-year employee at the plant who makes dashboards. “The employees were very upset.”

The shutdown also will jolt an estimated 1,200 businesses that supply products and services for NUMMI directly, as well as indirectly to the factory’s employees.

“This is terrible,” said Michael Johnson, a Hayward, Calif., resident who provides environmental services to NUMMI on a contract basis. “I won’t have a job.”

About 50,000 jobs in California depend on the factory’s ongoing operations, according to estimates provided by NUMMI and an independent group called Friends of NUMMI.

Those companies include parts suppliers in the East Bay, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County and Southern California. In addition, restaurants and bars near the factory could suffer.

The shutdown will force NUMMI workers to ponder a future darkened by the gloom that hangs over California’s devastated economic landscape.

“A lot of people have nowhere to go,” Warren said as he left the plant. “They will have a tough time deciding what to do with their lives.”

The decision by Toyota terminates the 25-year joint venture the company had with General Motors Corp. to produce a variety of vehicles at the New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. plant in Fremont.

“The plant closing down would be devastating,” said Ron Lopez, a San Jose resident who works at the plant. “We have a beautiful home near Mount Hamilton that we will have to sell. A lot of people will have to sell their houses.”

Lopez, a UAW trustee, was a body shop welder and paint shop worker before taking his current job in safety and ergonomics.

“It’s shocking,” said Michael Krepelka, a resident of Riverbank who has worked at NUMMI for four years in parts management.

“I’m going to start putting some applications together now.”

“It’s not make or break, but it will affect us,” said Lisa Dapelo, a bartender at Kirby’s Sports Bar, which is just down the street from NUMMI. “It will be a challenge for us to reinvent ourselves. We’ll have to change some shifts.” Kirby’s opens at 6 a.m. to serve certain shifts at NUMMI.

The facility’s prospects eroded steadily after GM emerged from bankruptcy and discarded NUMMI, leaving left the Fremont factory with the remnants of the old GM. Even worse, GM jettisoned its Pontiac brand, which caused GM to cease production of the Vibe vehicle at NUMMI.

Those decisions, in turn, forced Toyota to scrutinize the financial viability of its involvement in NUMMI absent a partner. Under pressure by its new chief executive officer to return to profitability in 2010, Toyota decided to exit the auto-making venture, leaving the factory with no manufacturers.

“California joins the ranks of states adversely affected by the bankruptcy of General Motors and the worldwide collapse in demand for automobiles,” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said. “There is nothing of greater importance than to boost job and economic growth for the historic percentage of Californians who find themselves unemployed during these difficult economic times.”

Alarmed by the possible shutdown, local, state and federal political leaders scrambled to craft a package of financial incentives, including tax breaks, that they could dangle before Toyota.

“This is not over,” Lt. Gov. John Garamendi said. “The Fremont auto plant is a very viable, efficient automobile assembly plant that has a very significant supply train and supply system.”

Despite the urgency, not a single piece of legislation has been approved by state lawmakers.

“The problem is not with the legislation, the problem is with GM’s decision to push the NUMMI plant into the bankruptcy case,” Garamendi said. “We have to create extensive inducements for Toyota to stay at this plant or for some other manufacturer to come into the plant. The incentives need to be made real. Those should be done in short order.”

In a statement, U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said she was profoundly disappointed with the decision. She also said the plant had to overcome numerous difficulties, especially after Toyota began to suffer financial losses in its overall operations.

“The company had lost money, and there was not enough work to keep the plant open after GM pulled out of the joint venture following the cancellation of the Pontiac Vibe, which carried one shift,” she said.

“The plant was aging, and it couldn’t compete with Toyota’s two other plants in the South. Finally, the cost of operations was extremely high in California.”

The shutdown is part of a wrenching restructuring of the auto industry nationwide, said Stephen Levy, director of the Palo Alto-based Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.

“It’s a piece of what devastated Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky, which had auto plants, and it finally reached here,” Levy said.

Union officials believe GM must bear much of the blame for the plant’s shutdown. GM had hoped to use NUMMI to learn firsthand about Toyota’s more nimble operating techniques so GM could improve its ossified operations.

When the NUMMI plant opened in 1984, it introduced to the U.S. auto industry several cutting-edge techniques: just-in-time inventories, factory robotics and quality circles. But Contreras, the union leader, thinks GM was not a sufficiently apt student.

“GM did learn, but they didn’t learn fast enough,” he said. “We are the new generation of autoworkers. But GM was still stuck in the old ways.”

I feel really badly for the employees there, but I think the big three recently proved that the unions were a bad idea. Workers don't necessarily need as much as they're getting. Or maybe they do. It's probably cheaper to live in Texas than in CA.

SaintLouieWoman
08-30-2009, 04:51 PM
I feel really badly for the employees there, but I think the big three recently proved that the unions were a bad idea. Workers don't necessarily need as much as they're getting. Or maybe they do. It's probably cheaper to live in Texas than in CA.
The taxes are much lower and they have a better attitude toward business.

The union folks need to realize that they weren't worth what they were being paid in those plants. They forgot that old, old adage that pigs get fat; hogs get slaughtered. I know they were trying to get their part of the American dream, but that dream is turning into a nightmare.

It's just sad.

Constitutionally Speaking
08-30-2009, 07:37 PM
The taxes are much lower and they have a better attitude toward business.

The union folks need to realize that they weren't worth what they were being paid in those plants. They forgot that old, old adage that pigs get fat; hogs get slaughtered. I know they were trying to get their part of the American dream, but that dream is turning into a nightmare.

It's just sad.



Tell me about it. I live in Michigan.

Rockntractor
08-30-2009, 07:41 PM
Just one of the many reasons I got out of machine shops!

stsinner
08-30-2009, 08:39 PM
Toyota is also shutting down their union run plant in California and moving the work to Texas:

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20090827/BUSINESS/908279934/1036?Title=Toyota-to-shut-down-production-at-NUMMI-plant



Good for them.. Screw the unions.. The union prolly tried to strong-arm them into 5% contractual pay raises and a month of vacation time.. Unions never have the company's best interests in mind-they fight for the workers, period..

enslaved1
08-30-2009, 11:59 PM
Vinnie From Indy (1000+ posts) Sun Aug-30-09 09:11 AM
Original message
Whirlpool to send 1,100 jobs to MEXICO, shut plant in Indiana - Wake Up America!
Advertisements [?]No jobs - no recovery! I hope all Americans understand that this recession is different than any other in our history. Companies like Whirlpool and others no longer need American workers. These jobs that are leaving are not coming back. While global corporations jumping around the globe to find the cheapest labor at all costs is hardly new, it is unforgivable that our government makes it easy and sometimes even provides incentives to move jobs out of the US.

Programs like "cash to clunkers" are simply temporary shots of adrenaline for our economy. I predict that sales of autos will again drop and put increasing pressure on US manufacturers. It does not seem like rocket science to understand that Americans without work will not be able to buy cars or washer & dryers etc.

Ross Perot was right! NAFTA, CAFTA and other agreements are creating a giant sucking sound as jobs are whisked out of the US for points around the globe.

************************************************** ****


You're just now figuring out NAFTA was a bad idea? I was as politically apathetic as you could get at the time and I knew NAFTA was a bad idea.

noonwitch
08-31-2009, 08:31 AM
Whirlpool is the only large company left in SE Michigan-their headquarters is in Benton Harbor, the poorest city in the state.