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Gingersnap
09-10-2009, 12:39 PM
Bed sharing 'bad for your health'

Sharing a bed may not be conducive for sleep
Couples should consider sleeping apart for the good of their health and relationship, say experts.

Sleep specialist Dr Neil Stanley told the British Science Festival how bed sharing can cause rows over snoring and duvet-hogging and robs precious sleep.

One study found that, on average, couples suffered 50% more sleep disturbances if they shared a bed.

Dr Stanley, who sleeps separately from his wife, points out that historically we were never meant to share our beds.

He said the modern tradition of the marital bed only began with the industrial revolution, when people moving to overcrowded towns and cities found themselves short of living space.

If you've been sleeping together and you both sleep perfectly well, then don't change, but don't be afraid to do something different

Before the Victorian era it was not uncommon for married couples to sleep apart. In ancient Rome, the marital bed was a place for sexual congress but not for sleeping.

Dr Stanley, who set up one of Britain's leading sleep laboratories at the University of Surrey, said the people of today should consider doing the same. "It's about what makes you happy. If you've been sleeping together and you both sleep perfectly well, then don't change, but don't be afraid to do something different.

"We all know what it's like to have a cuddle and then say 'I'm going to sleep now' and go to the opposite side of the bed. So why not just toddle off down the landing?"

Tossing and turning

He said poor sleep was linked to depression, heart disease, strokes, lung disorders, traffic and industrial accidents, and divorce, yet sleep was largely ignored as an important aspect of health.

Dr Robert Meadows, a sociologist at the University of Surrey, said: "People actually feel that they sleep better when they are with a partner but the evidence suggests otherwise."

He carried out a study to compare how well couples slept when they shared a bed versus sleeping separately. Based on 40 couples, he found that when couples share a bed and one of them moves in his or her sleep, there is a 50% chance that their slumbering partner will be disturbed as a result.

Despite this, couples are reluctant to sleep apart, with only 8% of those in their 40s and 50s sleeping in separate rooms, the British Science Festival heard.

Interesting. Maybe I could finally take out the ear plugs.

BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8245578.stm)

noonwitch
09-10-2009, 12:44 PM
That study doesn't address the one I share a bed with-my dog. I think I disturb her during the night more than she disturbs me.

megimoo
09-10-2009, 01:08 PM
Interesting. Maybe I could finally take out the ear plugs.

BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8245578.stm)
Take him a doctor for a sleep study .He may have Sleep Apnea?

What Is Sleep Apnea?
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/SleepApnea/SleepApnea_WhatIs.html

megimoo
09-10-2009, 01:15 PM
Interesting. Maybe I could finally take out the ear plugs.

BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8245578.stm)
This study is probably based sleeping in an old fashioned double bed .Most serious sleepers have by now invested in a much larger bed that allows a modicum of rolling about or even some sprinting in ones sleep.Very large beds these days call for double or even triple rolls to find ones mate !

Gingersnap
09-10-2009, 01:41 PM
Take him a doctor for a sleep study .He may have Sleep Apnea?

What Is Sleep Apnea?
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/SleepApnea/SleepApnea_WhatIs.html

I have enough trouble taking him to the doctor when he has arterial bleeding. A little old thing like intermittent suffocation isn't going to impress him.