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View Full Version : Aquacalypse Now: The End of Fish



PoliCon
09-29-2009, 06:19 AM
September 28, 2009 | 12:00 am


Our oceans have been the victims of a giant Ponzi scheme, waged with Bernie Madoff–like callousness by the world’s fisheries. Beginning in the 1950s, as their operations became increasingly industrialized--with onboard refrigeration, acoustic fish-finders, and, later, GPS--they first depleted stocks of cod, hake, flounder, sole, and halibut in the Northern Hemisphere. As those stocks disappeared, the fleets moved southward, to the coasts of developing nations and, ultimately, all the way to the shores of Antarctica, searching for icefishes and rockcods, and, more recently, for small, shrimplike krill. As the bounty of coastal waters dropped, fisheries moved further offshore, to deeper waters. And, finally, as the larger fish began to disappear, boats began to catch fish that were smaller and uglier--fish never before considered fit for human consumption. Many were renamed so that they could be marketed: The suspicious slimehead became the delicious orange roughy, while the worrisome Patagonian toothfish became the wholesome Chilean seabass. Others, like the homely hoki, were cut up so they could be sold sight-unseen as fish sticks and filets in fast-food restaurants and the frozen-food aisle.

The scheme was carried out by nothing less than a fishing-industrial complex--an alliance of corporate fishing fleets, lobbyists, parliamentary representatives, and fisheries economists. By hiding behind the romantic image of the small-scale, independent fisherman, they secured political influence and government subsidies far in excess of what would be expected, given their minuscule contribution to the GDP CONTINUED (http://www.tnr.com/article/environment-energy/aquacalypse-now?page=0,0)

PoliCon
09-29-2009, 06:19 AM
This has got to be the third or fourth t ime I've heard it claimed that the oceans would be out of fish sometime in the near future . . . .:rolleyes:

SarasotaRepub
09-29-2009, 07:54 AM
Paging Ted Danson...Ted Danson...:D

expat-pattaya
09-29-2009, 09:00 AM
Well, I think there is some validity to concern about over fishing. I'm no believer in global warming (outside normal global temp shifts) but in this case I do think we need a global agreement on how much of each species can be fished. It would be very nasty if the entire oceanic food chain fell apart for 20-30 years due to stupidity on our part.

Will the ocean recover if we overfish? Yes. Will it still provide food for us during that period? No. Think about it.

Gingersnap
09-29-2009, 12:47 PM
Overfishing is a real issue but not a world-ending one. We need to come up with better aquaculture systems to meet the demand for fish.

PoliCon
09-29-2009, 09:51 PM
Paging Ted Danson...Ted Danson...:D

I remember that commercial! :rolleyes:

PoliCon
09-29-2009, 09:53 PM
Overfishing is a real issue but not a world-ending one.And they have been predicting that the worlds oceans would be fished dry in the past - like how they keep predicting peak oil and there was the claim in the 70s that we would run out of certain minerals like copper . . . .:rolleyes:

Rockntractor
09-29-2009, 10:07 PM
I've got a pretty good stock of canned salmon but I don't know what you guys will do.

patriot45
09-29-2009, 10:13 PM
And they have been predicting that the worlds oceans would be fished dry in the past - like how they keep predicting peak oil and there was the claim in the 70s that we would run out of certain minerals like copper . . . .:rolleyes:

I try to do my part! :D

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i230/patriot45270/d30cdef9.jpg

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i230/patriot45270/markfishing013.jpg

kilastho
10-09-2009, 03:58 AM
They are really very cool, very wonderful
Great work .. really informative .. and thanks a lot for sharing ..
Glad it works as expected for you
looking good

marv
10-09-2009, 08:51 AM
I prefer beer battered, deep fried, farm raised catfish filets myself. But that's just me.

PoliCon
10-09-2009, 09:37 AM
I prefer beer battered, deep fried, farm raised catfish filets myself. But that's just me.

I like crab legs. So . . . pull off a few and throw the damn thing back. I mean how many legs does a crab really need?

noonwitch
10-13-2009, 08:58 AM
There's plenty of carp in the Detroit River, not that I would eat anything out of that river, especially a bottom-feeder. But lots of poor people eat it. I see people fishing on the piers at Belle Isle.


The Great Lakes still have plenty of fish at this point. The Zebra mussels started dying off for some reason this year(maybe they couldn't make the long-term adjustment to the Great Lakes, after all?) and now if the lamphrey eel starts doing the same, the trout and such will come back in larger numbers. Lake trout from Lake Michigan is a treat, beer-battered and deep fried is the best way to eat it. My dad likes living in Florida and being able to fish year round, but he misses fishing on Michigan lakes.


Salmon is pretty easy to catch this time of year in a lot of the rivers around here. I like it smoked best, or prepared with cream cheese, onions and lox, and baked with/on top of potatos.

Rockntractor
10-13-2009, 01:40 PM
I like crab legs. So . . . pull off a few and throw the damn thing back. I mean how many legs does a crab really need?

I always figured you for a thinker!

expat-pattaya
10-13-2009, 08:47 PM
I like crab legs. So . . . pull off a few and throw the damn thing back. I mean how many legs does a crab really need?

Now that's a glass is half full guy ;)

patriot45
10-13-2009, 09:03 PM
I like crab legs. So . . . pull off a few and throw the damn thing back. I mean how many legs does a crab really need?

Stone crab season down here is like that! First day of the season the price is phenominal! One time I had taken my 2nd wife to Crabby Bills, a kick ass seafood joint. It happened to be the first day of stone crab season and she wanted a pound, drowned in butter, so Okay have them. We spent about 4 hours there at the bar and she had another pound later on, well on the way to the motel across the street she upchucks about 60 bucks worth of crab and beer! :eek: I was pissed! They are good though, all I had was about 6 dozen oysters!:D





Stone Crab (Menippe Mercenaria)
Menippe-Greek, meaning force or courage
Mercinaria-Latin, something of value

In order to assure the continued survival of the species: Only one claw may be removed so the crab can defend itself. Egg bearing females are not allowed to be declawed.The crabs are captured in baited traps. No spears or hooks are allowed. Four inches from the first joint to the tip is the minimum legal size, that's about two ounces. A colossal can weigh 25 ounces or more. The large crusher claw can exert extreme pressure. As much as 19000 lbs. per square inch. Although their massive claws serve as deterrents to most predators, fishermen have reported the stone crab falls prey to the octopus. Stone crab season in Florida runs from October 15th to May 15. Stone crabs exhibit carnivorous feeding behavior. Sometimes in traps they resort to cannibalism! The claws make up half the weight of the whole crab, they are removed by carefully grabbing from the rear and twisting. The crab is returned to water and the claw regenerates. It takes between 12 to 24 months to reach legal size again. In 1963 stone crabs cost 30 cents a dozen wholesale.