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Rockntractor
10-05-2009, 01:04 PM
Does anybody know anything about this outfit they have been running a lot of commercials lately. They look like a good deal on the surface but I trust nothing.
http://www.forbetterlife.org/

PoliCon
10-05-2009, 01:31 PM
well . . . . they're not ACORN so that's a plus . . . .

linda22003
10-05-2009, 01:32 PM
I've never heard of them or seen their commercials.

PoliCon
10-05-2009, 01:35 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Foundation_for_a_Better_Life

a little wiki research turns up:


The Foundation for a Better Life is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2000 to promote behavioral values which it sees as positive;[1] it is entirely funded by billionaire Philip Anschutz.[2] The Foundation creates public service campaigns to communicate its values, such as honesty, caring, optimism, hard work, and helping others, in an attempt to make a difference in communities. Viewers are encouraged to step up to a higher level and to pass on positive values, with the rationale that these seemingly small examples of individuals living values-based lives may not change the world, but collectively they make a difference. The Foundation communicates its message through television, outdoor advertising, theatre, radio, and the Internet.

The foundations' website combines elements from all parts of the Foundation’s media outreach. Inspirational stories[3] and quotes[4] are provided for the 52 featured values,[5] and television[6] and billboard[7] advertisements are also available. Individuals are encouraged to nominate their hero and share inspirational stories.[8] Subscribers can also receive daily “Inbox Inspirations,” a “Value of the Week,” and the monthly “Good Newsletter,” via email.[9] The Foundation’s objective is to give visitors a variety of uplifting resources and to make them available to teachers, parents, and anyone interested in these positive messages.

noonwitch
10-06-2009, 09:05 AM
The billboards are all over this area. I think they are a positive thing. Some have pictures of really cute kids, some have people who have overcome great odds and become successful, most are about community and supporting each other. They don't have political overtones.

Rockntractor
10-06-2009, 10:13 AM
The billboards are all over this area. I think they are a positive thing. Some have pictures of really cute kids, some have people who have overcome great odds and become successful, most are about community and supporting each other. They don't have political overtones.

I haven't found anything political on the website either. I'm just a pessimist. I guess I have a hard time taking anything at face value. I'm going to research the founder.

Gingersnap
10-06-2009, 11:23 AM
Philip Anschutz has a lot of ties to Colorado and he's well known out here (or as well known as he can be since he's not a media whore).

He's gotten his fingers burned on some business deals that walked the line between corporate culture and the fabled "gray area" but he made sure he didn't profit from the deals and he pulled out entirely. His other interests are all over the map from energy to movie theaters.

He's considered a suspicious character by the Denver Post because he finances Christian and conservative media efforts like the foundation you're talking about, films (he financed the first Narnia movie), the PTC which advocates for family-friendly TV, the Weekly Standard (conservative news site), and others. He's politically active on behalf of Republicans and conservative policies.

He doesn't give interviews and he doesn't curry favor with the media. He's no saint but he does have the courage of his own convictions. I doubt that the foundation you're looking at would have any ties or interests that would run counter to a traditional Christian viewpoint. ;)

noonwitch
10-06-2009, 01:13 PM
Philip Anschutz has a lot of ties to Colorado and he's well known out here (or as well known as he can be since he's not a media whore).

He's gotten his fingers burned on some business deals that walked the line between corporate culture and the fabled "gray area" but he made sure he didn't profit from the deals and he pulled out entirely. His other interests are all over the map from energy to movie theaters.

He's considered a suspicious character by the Denver Post because he finances Christian and conservative media efforts like the foundation you're talking about, films (he financed the first Narnia movie), the PTC which advocates for family-friendly TV, the Weekly Standard (conservative news site), and others. He's politically active on behalf of Republicans and conservative policies.

He doesn't give interviews and he doesn't curry favor with the media. He's no saint but he does have the courage of his own convictions. I doubt that the foundation you're looking at would have any ties or interests that would run counter to a traditional Christian viewpoint. ;)


Thanks for the info, Ginger. My sister and I have been noticing the billboards and liking them-her kids like them, because they have positive messages. One had Shrek on it and it said "Ogre Achiever". And, to show it's not political, one had a photo of Whoopi Goldberg on it and had a message about how she overcame dyslexia.


I wish there were more of the billboards in Detroit-I see them mostly while driving to Grand Rapids, St. Joe or Traverse City. We could use a few more of those and a few less ads for malt liquor.