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View Full Version : Remembering the good ol' days.



ExLiberal
10-11-2009, 07:21 AM
I found this on another forum, thought I'd share it with you all. I wasn't even alive during these days but I envy those who were!



Here's something for some of you (a'hem) older people. To the rest who will read and scratch your head, sorry.

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Our moms used to make cake bater with raw eggs, and let us lick the bowl when she was done, and funny thing, we never once got poisoned from the egg.

Our Moms defrosted hamburger on the counter top, and we never got food poisoning. Our school sandwiches were wrapped in wax paper in a brown paper bag, not in ice pack coolers, but I can't remember getting ecoli.

Almost all of us would have rather gone swimming in the lake instead of a pristine pool (talk about boring), no beach closures then, and no clorine stains on our suits. And yet not one outbreak of mass infections. The only thing we had to worry about was someone peeing in the water near us.

The term cell phone would have conjured up a phone in a jail cell, and a pager was the school PA system.

We all took gym, not PE.... and risked permanent injury with a pair of high top Ked's (only worn in gym) instead of having cross-training athletic shoes with air cushion soles and built in light reflectors. I can't recall any injuries but they must have happened because they tell
us how much safer we are now.

Flunking gym was not an option...even for stupid kids! I guess PE must be much harder than gym.

Speaking of school, we all said prayers and sang the national anthem, and staying in detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention.

We must have had horribly damaged psyches. What an archaic health system we had then. Remember school nurses? Ours wore a hat and everything. And if I had a headache, I took an aspirin without fear of being suspended!

If we didn't make the grade, we failed. We thought that we were actually supposed to accomplish something before we were allowed to be proud of ourselves "for something!"

I just can't recall how bored we must have been without computers, Play Station, Nintendo, X-box or a 270 channel digital TV cable box.

Oh yeah.... and where was the Benadryl and sterilization kit when I got that bee sting? I could have been killed!

We played 'king of the hill' on piles of gravel left on vacant construction sites, and when we got hurt, Mom pulled out the 48-cent bottle of Mercurochrome (kids liked it better because it didn't sting like iodine did) and then we got our butt spanked for being on the construction site.

Now it's a trip to the emergency room, followed by a 10-day dose of a $49 bottle of antibiotics, and then Mom calls the attorney to sue the contractor for having only a six foot fense aroiund a horribly vicious pile of gravel where it was such a threat.

We didn't act up at the neighbor's house either because if we did, we got our butt spanked there and then we got butt spanked again when we got home.

I recall Donny Reynolds from next door coming over and doing his tricks on the front stoop, just before he fell off. Little did his Mom know that she could have owned our house. Instead, she picked him up and swatted him for being such a goof. It was a neighborhood run amuck.

To top it off, not a single person I knew hated their parents, or had ever been told that they were from a dysfunctional family. How could we possibly have known that?

We needed to get into group therapy and anger management classes? We were obviously so duped by so many societal ills, that we didn't even notice that the entire country wasn't taking Prozac! How did we ever survive?

Love to all of you who shared this era, and to those of you who didn't... Sorry for what you missed. Cause I wouldn't trade it for anything.

hampshirebrit
10-11-2009, 07:33 AM
Good post.

A good reminder of a time when we hadn't yet caught the risk-aversion and 'elf'n'safety viruses and become a society of bubble-wrapped wimps.

expat-pattaya
10-11-2009, 07:54 AM
Interesting post but utter nonsense.

There WERE more cripples from accidents. There WERE more kids dead from bad food etc. Just because MOST of them lived doesn't make it better. Kids DID get seriously injured in gym class.

I don't advocate the namby pamby fear of letting your kid fall down but to gloss over the reality of how many kids had permanent damage (mental and physical) from our ignorance in those days is silly.

Most of you know I spent a lot of time in Thailand. They are still in the same "unprotected" mindset. And I can point out lots of people with deformities from accidents in their youth. Or of they actually kept stats on mortality rates there I am certain they would be staggering in comparison to ours today.

If I believed the above letter I would also believe that just because my parents survived a lack of seat belts means I shouldn't use them. Silly. Just silly.

AlmostThere
10-11-2009, 03:47 PM
Interesting post but utter nonsense.

There WERE more cripples from accidents. There WERE more kids dead from bad food etc. Just because MOST of them lived doesn't make it better. Kids DID get seriously injured in gym class.

I don't advocate the namby pamby fear of letting your kid fall down but to gloss over the reality of how many kids had permanent damage (mental and physical) from our ignorance in those days is silly.

Most of you know I spent a lot of time in Thailand. They are still in the same "unprotected" mindset. And I can point out lots of people with deformities from accidents in their youth. Or of they actually kept stats on mortality rates there I am certain they would be staggering in comparison to ours today.

If I believed the above letter I would also believe that just because my parents survived a lack of seat belts means I shouldn't use them. Silly. Just silly.

If I may borrow a line from your post, interesting post but utter nonsense. Kids were a helluva lot safer and better off in the GOOD OLD DAYS than they are today. I grew up in New Orleans, in the city. When I was 10 and my brother was 11, we'd ride our bikes to Moffet's Pharmacy every Sunday to see what new comic books had come out on Saturday night. Neither of us wore helmets and neither of us suffered a brain injury as a result. But what really made it special was that our little trip to Moffet's every Sunday was 106 city blocks, round trip. Can anyone think of any large American city that they'd let a 10 and 11 year old ride bikes alone a distance of 106 blocks today? I didn't think so. We could go out to play with the understanding that we would be home by dark. Key words here are "go out to play", not sit in front of some personal computer/game console. Actually, they were years away from even being invented. Even as kids, we actually had to learn to be self reliant and responsible. How could we possibly have survived that?

New Orleans is HOT in the summer. We got air conditioning when I was in high school. Cutting the grass was a push rotary mower. Getting to school meant walking or riding a bike. My family had practically nothing when I was a kid. My kids never knew a day when they had to do without. I'll tell you the truth, I was far richer as a kid than my kids ever were.

Kids that lived in the GOOD OLD DAYS aren't lucky they survived those days, they're lucky they had the good fortune to grow up in those days.

hampshirebrit
10-11-2009, 04:14 PM
If I may borrow a line from your post, interesting post but utter nonsense. Kids were a helluva lot safer and better off in the GOOD OLD DAYS than they are today. I grew up in New Orleans, in the city. When I was 10 and my brother was 11, we'd ride our bikes to Moffet's Pharmacy every Sunday to see what new comic books had come out on Saturday night. Neither of us wore helmets and neither of us suffered a brain injury as a result. But what really made it special was that our little trip to Moffet's every Sunday was 106 city blocks, round trip. Can anyone think of any large American city that they'd let a 10 and 11 year old ride bikes alone a distance of 106 blocks today? I didn't think so. We could go out to play with the understanding that we would be home by dark. Key words here are "go out to play", not sit in front of some personal computer/game console. Actually, they were years away from even being invented. Even as kids, we actually had to learn to be self reliant and responsible. How could we possibly have survived that?

New Orleans is HOT in the summer. We got air conditioning when I was in high school. Cutting the grass was a push rotary mower. Getting to school meant walking or riding a bike. My family had practically nothing when I was a kid. My kids never knew a day when they had to do without. I'll tell you the truth, I was far richer as a kid than my kids ever were.

Kids that lived in the GOOD OLD DAYS aren't lucky they survived those days, they're lucky they had the good fortune to grow up in those days.

Great response. You get it. I'm glad that at least someone does. Kids and adults need the room to take some risks, if only because allowing people to take smaller risks is the only way to let them learn what the really bad risks are.

Life is a risk. Breathing is a risk. Taking a dump is a risk. Do we really want some nanny telling us how to take a shit? I hope not. I know I fucking don't. But it's heading that way.

We've been busy raising a nation of Nintendo and corn-fed pussies for years. This is going to catch up to us, in fact it already has started to.

We are now so goddamn risk-shy now that our kids are getting fat because their parents don't let them walk to school anymore.

UK and US society is scared of its own shadow now. There is absolutely no way that either of us could re-fight WW2 as a nation now, even if we had to. The Health and Safety people just would not allow it.

sgrooms
10-11-2009, 06:26 PM
I am 37, and I don't ever remember being bored as a kid.

We had two stations on the tv, three if you turned the antenna just right. It was fuzzy, the sound sucked, and we were thrilled to have it! When we finally moved to a town with cable we got 14 or 15 channels and I thought I had died and went to heaven!

We didn't have "city" water; in fact we carried our drinking water from the well in the back yard and took baths in water from the cistern. Rain water from the roof, you know. We did laundry once a week in a wringer machine because the well couldn't carry all the need for water for an automatic machine. We weren't "green" just careful.

I remember being seriously ill once in my childhood. I spent four days home from school with some kind of virus; coudn't tell you what it was but Mom stayed home with me. We didn't run to the hospital, we didn't look for a lawyer to sue someone for a mysterious virus. Mom just took care of me.

Now I have 200 channels on the tv and there is nothing more to watch then there was when I was a kid. Cartoons are on 24/7 instead of being a thing to look forward to on Saturday morning. My kids complain of nothing to do if what they want is not on the idiot box. I refuse to buy a video game machine.

I am not sure kids today know how to play.