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Perilloux
07-21-2008, 08:31 AM
Despite hype, Obama wonít carry Georgia (http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/shared-blogs/ajc/thinkingright/entries/2008/07/18/despite_hype_obama_wont_carry.html)
By Jim Wooten | Friday, July 18, 2008, 09:24 PM

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

What happened? The throw-the-rascals-out sentiment never materialized at the polls last Tuesday. Incumbents won. Clayton County voters pitched a fit about a sorry school board and the local systemís possible loss of accreditation. And when it came time to do something about it, only one in five bothered to go to the polls.

The lesson from last Tuesday? For one, U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss is more secure than Iíd previously thought. Part of it is that both Republican and Democratic incumbents fared well. The same was true for incumbents in the Georgia House and Senate. A loss or a runoff here and there, but through the primary, itís an incumbentís year. And Clayton. Passionate people did nothing to follow through. A primary is not a presidential election. People who register now may indeed turn out in November for a historic event ó the first general election with a black man as a major-party nominee.

But, stripped of the hype, it seems even less likely that Georgia could be in play for Barack Obama or that this will be anything other than the usual strongly contested presidential election. Those who are most excited about the Obama candidacy ó the young ó are historically no-shows at the polls.

<<Snip<<

George W. Bush defeated John Kerry in the state by about 550,000 votes in 2004. The last Democrat to carry Georgia was Bill Clinton in 1992. He won by a 14,000-vote margin because independent Ross Perot siphoned off 300,000 ó one reason no disenchanted conservative should abandon John McCain for Bob Barr. The primary point to be made here is that a gap exists between political hype and reality. Weíre being spun. It is shaping up to be, well, a typical presidential election year ó hyper and partisan. Georgia is not in play, the hype notwithstanding.


More at the link.

lacarnut
07-22-2008, 12:03 AM
The Magic Negro will not win 1 state in the south and I look for him to lose two or three northeastern states. The Obamanuts can get out their crying towels now. :)

xavierob82
07-23-2008, 09:52 AM
The Magic Negro will not win 1 state in the south and I look for him to lose two or three northeastern states. The Obamanuts can get out their crying towels now. :)


No, Obama will carry all the states in the Northeast. Bank on it.

lacarnut
07-23-2008, 10:46 AM
No, Obama will carry all the states in the Northeast. Bank on it.

There are many whites in the northeast that will not vote for a black man. Liberals like to talk the talk but are not willing to walk the walk. Additionally, independents will not vote for a racist liberal with little experience in government.

LibraryLady
07-23-2008, 10:51 AM
Election 2008: Ohio Presidential Election
McCain Opens Modest Lead in Ohio
Tuesday, July 22, 2008

John McCain has opened a modest lead over Barack Obama in the key swing state of Ohio. The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey in the Buckeye State shows McCain attracting 46% of the vote while Obama earns 40%

People are starting to recognize Zer-0 for what he is. nothing

Rebel Yell
07-23-2008, 11:23 AM
If Obama wins Georgia, McCain scandal not withstanding, I will not be seen at CU again. That being said, see y'all in November.

ConJinx
07-23-2008, 11:40 AM
Has anything been said about Florida. Most blacks and Cubans I speak with can't stomach the slip speech of Obama. But as I've been saying " Obama is not the anti-Christ, but Satan needs minions too."

LibraryLady
07-23-2008, 11:42 AM
Latest Rasmussen shows McCain ahead



Election 2008: Florida Presidential Election
Florida: McCain Leads By Seven
Monday, June 30, 2008

The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey in Florida shows John McCain leading Barack Obama by seven percentage points, 48% to 41%. One week earlier, it was McCain by eight. A month ago, the Republican had a ten-point lead. This is the sixth straight Rasmussen Reports telephone survey to show McCain leading Obama in the Sunshine State. (See video)

McCain is now viewed favorably by 57% of Florida voters, a figure that has not changed since the previous survey. Obama is viewed favorably by 44%, reflecting a seven point decline in eight days. Even more dramatic is the fact that 40% of Florida voters have a Very Unfavorable opinion of Obama in the June 26 survey. Thatís up from 29% eight days earlier before the debate over offshore drilling escalated.

Odysseus
07-23-2008, 11:48 AM
Latest Rasmussen shows McCain ahead

I think that CNN has already declared it for Obama... ;)

LibraryLady
07-23-2008, 11:49 AM
New Florida polling due out at noon.

xavierob82
07-23-2008, 07:34 PM
There are many whites in the northeast that will not vote for a black man. Liberals like to talk the talk but are not willing to walk the walk. Additionally, independents will not vote for a racist liberal with little experience in government.


I'm from New England and I can tell you that is absolute pure BS. Obama is well liked in New England, he might have a little trouble in New Hampshire where folks are more libertarian minded and where John McCain is very well liked, but Obama will still narrowly beat McCain there. Obama is leading Vermont, Maine, New York, Mass., by double digits.

Pennsylvania will be a battleground, like it always is, but like New Jersey, it always appears that Republicans might be competetive there, but at the last minute all the undecideds break for the Democratic candidate and the states go blue. It happens every election cycle like clockwork.

lacarnut
07-23-2008, 07:58 PM
I'm from New England and I can tell you that is absolute pure BS. Obama is well liked in New England, he might have a little trouble in New Hampshire where folks are more libertarian minded and where John McCain is very well liked, but Obama will still narrowly beat McCain there. Obama is leading Vermont, Maine, New York, Mass., by double digits.

Pennsylvania will be a battleground, like it always is, but like New Jersey, it always appears that Republicans might be competetive there, but at the last minute all the undecideds break for the Democratic candidate and the states go blue. It happens every election cycle like clockwork.

Do you know that 30% of voters polled stated that race is important. The Repubs. need to stay away from the race issue at all costs. However, has there ever been a black presidential candidate? How do you know, I am sure those Bostonians will not tell you, that those whites will not vote for a black man. I do believe, we are in unchartered waters here. Plus, I think that McCain will get the majority of independent voters. I could care less about polls which I think are slanted toward liberal bias. I think that McCain will win PA & NJ and the race will be over.

Phillygirl
07-23-2008, 08:24 PM
I'm from New England and I can tell you that is absolute pure BS. Obama is well liked in New England, he might have a little trouble in New Hampshire where folks are more libertarian minded and where John McCain is very well liked, but Obama will still narrowly beat McCain there. Obama is leading Vermont, Maine, New York, Mass., by double digits.

Pennsylvania will be a battleground, like it always is, but like New Jersey, it always appears that Republicans might be competetive there, but at the last minute all the undecideds break for the Democratic candidate and the states go blue. It happens every election cycle like clockwork.

Pennsylvania will be very competitive. And there are people here that will not vote for Obama because he is a black man. Keep in mind that a large portion of Pennsylvania is older. A big portion of the D's here are old school D's...Catholic, union, ethnic types. The abortion issue, as always, will cause them problems. A black guy from Chicago who has already accused them of being bitter and clinging to their guns and religion, is going to be a tough act for them to vote for.

Although my grandparents are deceased (and they didn't vote anyway), I often wonder what they would be thinking this election cycle. My grandfather was an Irish Catholic teamster. He didn't like Bill Clinton. Our political arguments always ended when we got to the abortion issue and how it was that he could be a D in light of that. I don't believe he could be on board with Obama. He wasn't a racist by any stretch. But I do think a guy as relatively young as Obama, with very little in common with these people, would be a hard sell.

It's interesting to me that Obama has no stories to tell about his work during high school, college, or law school. There are a lot of working class families in upstate PA and the middle part of the state where that kind of a background is important.