PDA

View Full Version : Brits' terror over hole in jumbo



LogansPapa
07-25-2008, 11:01 AM
Passengers on a packed jumbo jet flight from London spoke today of their terror after a gaping hole appeared in the plane as it headed for Australia.

Some passengers were so terrified they vomited when oxygen masks had to be used as the Melbourne-bound Qantas Boeing 747 plane prepared to make an emergency landing in the Philippines.

Passengers spoke of hearing a loud bang and debris flying into the first class cabin as the planeís flooring gave way, part of the ceiling collapsed and the plane reportedly plunged 20,000ft.

The aircraft touched down safely in Manila at 11.15am local time and amazingly all 346 passengers and 19 crew disembarked normally.

Manila airport operations officer Ding Lima told local radio the plane lost cabin pressure shortly after take-off on the Hong Kong to Melbourne leg of its journey and the pilot radioed for an emergency landing.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1469970.ece

Sonnabend
07-25-2008, 11:02 AM
Matter is in hand, no one hurt, investigation underway.

AmPat
07-25-2008, 11:10 AM
I suspect the "plunging 20,000 feet" was deliberate to descend below 10,000. This is normal but I'm sure frightening. I as a pilot make a truly bad passenger. Had I been on the flight, descending below 10,000 would not have improved the breathing due to the massive evacuation of my colon into my pants.:eek:

LogansPapa
07-25-2008, 11:13 AM
Doesnít look like heavy structural - just a side-wall blow out. My bet is something got on board and let go - right next to the fuselage tube wall. The inspections on these long-flight / over-water aircraft are (especially with this airline) at a surgical level. Somebody probably packed something unsafe - and labeled it otherwise.

Fortunately - they wonít be in business any longer, and, of course the crew had the professionalism to keep everyone safe on board.

LogansPapa
07-25-2008, 02:02 PM
more on the story......

Qantas passenger Phill Restall, from Chippenham in the UK, describes how he was woken by a loud bang on flight QF30 to Melbourne which was forced to make an emergency landing after leaving Hong Kong.

I was asleep in the business section of the plane. All of a sudden there was a loud bang which woke me up with a jolt. There was a mist coming through the cabin and the oxygen masks discharged.

The cabin crew shouted to everyone to put them on, then they sat down.

We wearing them for about 15 minutes until we descended.

We went down very rapidly to equalise out the pressure.

I guessed it was going down a bit faster than usual. From the little knowledge I have of these things I thought that was what the pilot was doing.

No-one panicked, there was no screaming. It wasn't your typical television movie. Everyone listened to the cabin staff.

It was never out of control. Hats off to all of the Qantas staff.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7525233.stm

LogansPapa
07-25-2008, 05:11 PM
Passengers on Qantas 747 with damaged fuselage were riveted, but was a panel loose?

It is not unusual that parts fall off aircraft in flight, but it is extremely uncommon that they cause a decompression of the passenger cabin.

In this instance an outer skin panel close to the wing and adjacent to one of the forward cargo hold doors separated from the rest of the airframe. Pictures of the aircraft clearly show that this was a system failure rather than being caused by, for example, an internal or external explosion. The panel in question appears to have been ripped away cleanly by the passage of the wind over the skin of the aircraft.

For this to occur, the indication is that a fault, either in manufacturing or maintenance, occurred.

The skin of aircraft is made up of very many such panels, all of which are riveted and glued in place.

Where such riveting is faulty for whatever reason, conditions exist such that, over time, wear and tear weakens joints and inevitably leads to failure similar to that that occurred on board QF30. As the air accident investigators go about the business of determining the cause of this incident, a thorough examination of the zone where the rupture occurred will be carried out. The focus for investigators will most likely rest on metal fatigue either within the skin sections or the riveting holding the panel to remainder of the airframe.

Boeing, the manufacturer of the 747-400 series of aircraft, as well as other airlines operating this type of aircraft, will be watching the progress of the investigation closely.

Should a flaw emerge that requires remedial work in other 747-400 aircraft operating around the world, then instructions will be delivered promptly to ensure that the remainder of in-service aircraft are as safe as they can possibly be.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article4402697.ece

Sonnabend
07-25-2008, 06:55 PM
Somebody probably packed something unsafe - and labeled it otherwise.

No. Already ruled out. I'll have a bacon burger with fries, and hurry it up.


Fortunately - they won’t be in business any longer

Excuse me??


and, of course the crew had the professionalism to keep everyone safe on board.QANTAS crew and pilots are the best trained, best equipped teams in the world, our safety record is second to none.

LogansPapa
07-26-2008, 12:09 PM
No. Already ruled out. I'll have a bacon burger with fries, and hurry it up..

Says the changer of bed-pans.:p




Excuse me??..

Fucktard: Companies that ship unsafe items and don't label them as such - don't get to be in business anymore. Ref. ox-generators mis-labeled in the Florida crash a few years back. You can't really be that stupid.



QANTAS crew and pilots are the best trained, best equipped teams in the world, our safety record is second to none.

Yes - the record is public. You don't have to reiterate something that's obvious just to feel part of the conversation.

Sonnabend
07-26-2008, 06:59 PM
Says the changer of bed-pans.I left nursing more than fifteen years ago...longer.

Nurses do a damned sight more than that,and as usual all you can do is sneer.


Yes - the record is public. You don't have to reiterate something that's obvious just to feel part of the conversation.Our airline, I'll say what I pleas,e and you keep a civil tongue in your head.

LogansPapa
07-28-2008, 10:22 AM
Experts focus on oxygen tank in Quantas explosion

Associated Press - July 27, 2008 3:33 AM ET

MANILA, Philippines (AP) - Australia's Quantas airlines has been ordered to urgently inspect every oxygen bottle aboard its fleet of 30 Boeing 747 jetliners following the emergency landing of 1 of its jets Friday in the Philippines.

Australian investigators are focusing on the possibility that an oxygen cylinder could have exploded mid-flight, ripping a hole in the side of the jet with 346 passengers on board. The pilot managed to land it safely at the airport in Manila and no one was injured.

Officials say the investigation is now safety-related, with no evidence of terrorism.

Australian aviation safety authority official Peter Gibson says an inspection of all Qantas oxygen bottles on its fleet will take several days.

Investigators say they're still gathering the facts and the oxygen bottle probe is just one theory.

http://www.katc.com/global/story.asp?s=8741803

Sonnabend
07-28-2008, 11:16 AM
There is no U.

QANTAS.

Get it right.

LogansPapa
07-28-2008, 11:20 AM
Yeah, www.katc.com. Get it right!

Sonnabend
07-28-2008, 11:42 AM
..so you dont fact check what you post.

Or spell check.

Or even read.

LogansPapa
07-28-2008, 12:18 PM
2nd Qantas emergency
Updated: 01:17, Tuesday July 29, 2008

A Qantas jet was forced to make an emergency landing at Adelaide airport last night after a door opened during a flight to Melbourne.

The incident came just three days after a hole was blasted in the fuselage of a Qantas 747 during an international flight to Melbourne, forcing it to land in Manila.

The Melbourne-bound Boeing 737-800 departed Adelaide at 6.08pm yesterday and returned 37 minutes later, the Herald Sun newspaper reported today.

Passengers said a door had opened and caused 'chaos' in the cabin.

But Qantas sources said a door had not closed properly over a wheel bay and the aircraft turned back near Murray Bridge, south-east of Adelaide.

The jet remained in Adelaide while passengers were transferred to another flight.

The incident follows the naming of Jetstar boss Alan Joyce yesterday as the new chief executive of parent company Qantas.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/article.aspx?id=253456

FlaGator
07-28-2008, 12:42 PM
2nd Qantas emergency
Updated: 01:17, Tuesday July 29, 2008

A Qantas jet was forced to make an emergency landing at Adelaide airport last night after a door opened during a flight to Melbourne.

The incident came just three days after a hole was blasted in the fuselage of a Qantas 747 during an international flight to Melbourne, forcing it to land in Manila.

The Melbourne-bound Boeing 737-800 departed Adelaide at 6.08pm yesterday and returned 37 minutes later, the Herald Sun newspaper reported today.

Passengers said a door had opened and caused 'chaos' in the cabin.

But Qantas sources said a door had not closed properly over a wheel bay and the aircraft turned back near Murray Bridge, south-east of Adelaide.

The jet remained in Adelaide while passengers were transferred to another flight.

The incident follows the naming of Jetstar boss Alan Joyce yesterday as the new chief executive of parent company Qantas.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/article.aspx?id=253456

Damn Koalas. They look all cute and cuddly but don't let that fool you. In reality they are master terrorists, capable of opening airplane doors at 30,000 feet.

LogansPapa
07-28-2008, 02:51 PM
Qantas Defends Handling of Accident

By TIM JOHNSTON / Published: July 29, 2008

SYDNEY ó Qantas Airways officials said Monday that an air safety directive issued by the United States Federal Aviation Authority with a warning about how oxygen cylinders were attached to Boeing 747 aircraft did not apply to the plane that was forced to make an emergency landing last week with a hole in its fuselage.

The chief executive of Qantas, Geoff Dixon, said at a news conference Monday that he believed the airline had done all it could both before and during the incident on Friday.

"We donít know and we canít speculate on what did happen to this aircraft but obviously thereís every chance it has something to do with the aircraft and its something that may well have been out of our control," he said. "More than likely it was, but the things that were in our control we handled very, very well." Investigators are focusing on the possibility that a problem with an oxygen cylinder located in the forward cargo area ended up causing a six-foot hole to be torn from part of the planeís fuselage on Friday. None of the 365 passengers and crew members on Flight QF30, which was en route from Hong Kong to Melbourne, was injured.

An oxygen cylinder is missing from the plane. But Monday, investigators in Manila said a valve and other fragments had been found that will be tested to see if they came from the cylinder.

Media reports here said the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority and the F.A.A. had ordered airline operators, including Qantas, to inspect and replace the brackets that held the oxygen canisters in place. The F.A.A. directive became effective on May 7.

However, both Qantas and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority say that the directive only applied to a limited number of aircraft, and that the damaged plane was not among them.

Passengers reported hearing a loud bang before the cabin lost pressure.

At the time, the plane was flying at an altitude of 29,000 feet. The pilots brought the plane down to 10,000 feet and turned it toward Manila. Only after landing did any of them see the hole, which was just below and in front of where the starboard wing joined the fuselage.

Investigators say that the fact that the floor of the passenger cabin above the hole was pushed up indicated that some kind of explosion was involved, but added that it may take some time to determine what may have caused it.

Among the first to examine the plane were security agencies, and investigators said they had uncovered no evidence that terrorism was involved.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/29/world/asia/29qantas.html?ref=asia

megimoo
07-28-2008, 04:32 PM
Damn Koalas. They look all cute and cuddly but don't let that fool you. In reality they are master terrorists, capable of opening airplane doors at 30,000 feet.

Qantas probe focuses on oxygen tank

MANILA, Philippines - Investigators found fragments that appear to bolster the theory that an oxygen tank exploded on a Qantas jet, forcing it to make a dramatic emergency landing with a car-sized hole in its fuselage, an official said Monday.

Neville Blyth, a senior investigator from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said a valve and other small fragments would be tested to determine if they came from the tank, which is designed to provide oxygen to passengers during an emergency.

He said the fragments were found in the passenger cabin close to where the missing tank was stored in the cargo hold, along with five other cylinders.

The Boeing 747-400 had to make an emergency landing after a quick descent from 29,000 feet (8,800 meters) Friday. The 365 passengers and crew, who reported hearing a loud bang before the plane suddenly depressurized, were not injured.

"We recovered ... a valve from an oxygen cylinder," Blyth told a news conference. "It is likely that that valve is from the missing cylinder."

If the valve and other fragments are determined

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080728/ap_on_re_as/philippines_emergency_landing