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View Full Version : Could you ever vote for a non-Christian?



CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-15-2009, 12:16 AM
I've seen a lot of discord on whether our current President is a Christian, a Muslim, an atheist, and to a great deal of people it seems to matter what religion a candidate or a public official is. Romney, for another example, faced a great deal of scorn even among the right, because he was a Mormon; Huckabee from the left because he's a Young Earth creationist. However, on the bright side, America has voted so far two Pagan officials, and even one Muslim senator.

So my question to you is--Could you vote for an open non-Christian? A Hindu, a Buddhist, Muslim; hell, even a Satanist or Atheist?

PoliCon
12-15-2009, 12:27 AM
show me one worth voting for.

djones520
12-15-2009, 12:36 AM
It would depend. I don't care what religion anyone is, as long as they don't use their authority in favor of said religion.

I've entertained the idea of running for public office for a couple of years now (much later in my life of course, still gotta finish my military career), but I know a major draw back on my part would be that I'm an atheist. I know that I have no problem at all in letting my personal religious views affect my judgement on certain topics. I treat all other religions with respect, and completely respect everyones right to believe what they want (for which I've been attacked for a number of times here, go figure). But, with the stigma that other Atheists have been bringing on my brand of belief, how would I over come that to the conservative base whose vote I'd be trying to garner?

lacarnut
12-15-2009, 01:50 AM
So my question to you is--Could you vote for an open non-Christian? A Hindu, a Buddhist, Muslim; hell, even a Satanist or Atheist?

Possible but probably not. How about you; could you vote for a Christian?

Rockntractor
12-15-2009, 01:51 AM
It would depend. I don't care what religion anyone is, as long as they don't use their authority in favor of said religion.

I've entertained the idea of running for public office for a couple of years now (much later in my life of course, still gotta finish my military career), but I know a major draw back on my part would be that I'm an atheist. I know that I have no problem at all in letting my personal religious views affect my judgement on certain topics. I treat all other religions with respect, and completely respect everyones right to believe what they want (for which I've been attacked for a number of times here, go figure). But, with the stigma that other Atheists have been bringing on my brand of belief, how would I over come that to the conservative base whose vote I'd be trying to garner?

It is none of my business really and I'm not much on labels but if I had to I would say you're more of an agnostic.

djones520
12-15-2009, 01:54 AM
It is none of my business really and I'm not much on labels but if I had to I would say your more of an agnostic.

Nope. I deny the total existance of any god-like power. I am an Atheist. But I know that my belief is faith based just like any of yours is, so I respect your rights to hold your faith, as I expect others to respect mine.

Rockntractor
12-15-2009, 02:02 AM
Nope. I deny the total existance of any god-like power. I am an Atheist. But I know that my belief is faith based just like any of yours is, so I respect your rights to hold your faith, as I expect others to respect mine.

That is why I called you an agnostic because atheist implies a perfect knowledge which is an attribute of God and they would make you a god, who you do not believe in.

djones520
12-15-2009, 02:12 AM
That is why I called you an agnostic because atheist implies a perfect knowledge which is an attribute of God and they would make you a god, who you do not believe in.

Back on topic, what would you do? Would you vote for an Atheist who respected the foundations of this nation and it's myriad religions?

Rockntractor
12-15-2009, 02:33 AM
Back on topic, what would you do? Would you vote for an Atheist who respected the foundations of this nation and it's myriad religions?

I would vote for an agnostic but i would not vote for an atheist who claims to be infallible in his knowledge. An agnostic honestly states that based on his present knowledge and experience he does not believe in a god. An atheist dogmatically states that which he does not know and such arrogance on either side of the belief issue is unfit for political office.

samurai
12-15-2009, 04:18 AM
As an agnostic myself, yes, of course I'd vote for a non-Christian.

linda22003
12-15-2009, 05:16 AM
So my question to you is--Could you vote for an open non-Christian? A Hindu, a Buddhist, Muslim; hell, even a Satanist or Atheist?

I notice "Jewish" didn't even make the list. :rolleyes:

linda22003
12-15-2009, 05:18 AM
If a candidate was one whose political positions I agreed with - and Lord knows, that happens pretty rarely as it is - the religion would not matter. I've never voted for or against someone based on religion yet. Political office is not theological office.

Sonnabend
12-15-2009, 06:11 AM
Anyone but a raghead.

Space Gravy
12-15-2009, 06:17 AM
Religion plays no part in the selection of who I vote for.

FlaGator
12-15-2009, 07:38 AM
I will vote on who ever best represents my political beliefs and is most qualified to lead. Their faith makes no difference to me. There are plenty of good christians who would probably make awful leaders. Like wise there are probably atheists who would make good leaders.

Gingersnap
12-15-2009, 09:51 AM
Religion isn't a factor for me but principles are. If a candidate can't form or abide by any principles other than those generated by the latest poll numbers then he would lose my vote.

On the other hand, I would be inclined toward a candidate who had clearly stated principles even if I didn't agree with every one of them.

I never did understand the antipathy toward Romney and Huckabee from the religion angle. Most of the LDS who bother to go into politics are squeaky clean, pro-America types (a refreshing change from the usual politician). How Huckabee's views on Creation could matter to anybody is a mystery to me. It's not like he planned to force anyone else into his viewpoint.

A Jew, Muslim, Hindu, or pagan who held obvious American values and who promoted conservative ideals would get my vote over any cultural Christian who wrapped himself up in the Sermon on the Mount while playing with Communism.

stsinner
12-15-2009, 09:56 AM
Possible but probably not. How about you; could you vote for a Christian?

Good one!

For me, since we were founded as a Christian nation, I could not vote for a known non-Christian. It's sick enough that our own populace attacks Christmas or celebrates it with no mention of Jesus Christ.

stsinner
12-15-2009, 09:58 AM
I will vote on who ever best represents my political beliefs and is most qualified to lead. Their faith makes no difference to me. There are plenty of good christians who would probably make awful leaders. Like wise there are probably atheists who would make good leaders.

Unfortunately, I can't argue with that logic.

wilbur
12-15-2009, 10:02 AM
I would vote for an agnostic but i would not vote for an atheist who claims to be infallible in his knowledge. An agnostic honestly states that based on his present knowledge and experience he does not believe in a god. An atheist dogmatically states that which he does not know and such arrogance on either side of the belief issue is unfit for political office.

Most atheists that I know of today are atheist in the spirit of Bertrand Russell...



I never know whether I should say "Agnostic" or whether I should say "Atheist". It is a very difficult question and I daresay that some of you have been troubled by it. As a philosopher, if I were speaking to a purely philosophic audience I should say that I ought to describe myself as an Agnostic, because I do not think that there is a conclusive argument by which one prove that there is not a God.

On the other hand, if I am to convey the right impression to the ordinary man in the street I think I ought to say that I am an Atheist, because when I say that I cannot prove that there is not a God, I ought to add equally that I cannot prove that there are not the Homeric gods. None of us would seriously consider the possibility that all the gods of homer really exist, and yet if you were to set to work to give a logical demonstration that Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, and the rest of them did not exist you would find it an awful job. You could not get such proof.

Therefore, in regard to the Olympic gods, speaking to a purely philosophical audience, I would say that I am an Agnostic. But speaking popularly, I think that all of us would say in regard to those gods that we were Atheists. In regard to the Christian God, I should, I think, take exactly the same line.

wilbur
12-15-2009, 10:05 AM
I never did understand the antipathy toward Romney and Huckabee from the religion angle. Most of the LDS who bother to go into politics are squeaky clean, pro-America types (a refreshing change from the usual politician). How Huckabee's views on Creation could matter to anybody is a mystery to me. It's not like he planned to force anyone else into his viewpoint.


Believing creationism speaks to a profound... a profound, profound lack of judgement. It seems this intuition was slightly vindicated, tragically, with Mike Huckabee's doozy of a pardon.

And well mormonism... its not got quite the reputation for crazy that scientology does, but its close. I can understand people being uneasy about it, more so than other religions.

Speedy
12-15-2009, 10:17 AM
A Jew, Muslim, Hindu, or pagan who held obvious American values and who promoted conservative ideals would get my vote over any cultural Christian who wrapped himself up in the Sermon on the Mount while playing with Communism.

No way a Muslim of any stripe would ever get my vote. A pro-American Muslim would an apostate under any definition of Islam so he would be a hypocrite by the tenents of his own religion and if he was a true believing Muslim he would not adhere to the principles of America.

As far as an Atheist, I could if he was not pointing to the fact that he was an Atheist as a candidate. Those tend to gain credibility by bashing religions. I would vote for an Atheist who bashed Islam, though. Every Atheist I have ever known, seen or heard about has lacked the balls to do that.

Gingersnap
12-15-2009, 10:21 AM
Believing creationism speaks to a profound... a profound, profound lack of judgement. It seems this intuition was slightly vindicated, tragically, with Mike Huckabee's doozy of a pardon.

No, it doesn't wilbur. People have the capacity to hold views on one area that diverge fairly widely from the views they hold in other areas because the decision-making process uses different tools and priorities for different ends. If you can't realize this simple fact, I would be astonished.

Huckabee's decision to loose a killer didn't have jack to do with his views on dinosaurs. He was relying on the advice of experts as well as the general "progressive" view that 16 year criminals are fundamentally different from 36 year old criminals and so deserve special consideration. He didn't come by that idea through his close reading of the OT which takes the opposite stance.

His views on this matter were much, much more in line with typical liberal views on crime and children than they were with typical Christian literalist views on the same subject. :rolleyes:

noonwitch
12-15-2009, 11:16 AM
I've voted for two jewish people-my senator and congressman, who also happen to be brothers (the Levins).

The question for me would be am I willing to vote for an evangelical christian? Probably not, because I am prochoice.

FlaGator
12-15-2009, 11:18 AM
Believing creationism speaks to a profound... a profound, profound lack of judgement. It seems this intuition was slightly vindicated, tragically, with Mike Huckabee's doozy of a pardon.

And well mormonism... its not got quite the reputation for crazy that scientology does, but its close. I can understand people being uneasy about it, more so than other religions.

So you have issues with just about every American President every elected? I say just about every because I'm not so sure about Obama.

Lager
12-15-2009, 12:22 PM
Believing creationism speaks to a profound... a profound, profound lack of judgement.

That has got to be one of the silliest, undefendable statements I've seen you make.
You speak of someone's opinion on the creation of life as a "profound lack of judgement". Do you really want to talk about a lack of judgement? Darlings of the left -- such as Bill Clinton -- was it not a deep, deep total void of any judgement what so ever, to mess around with a young, immature intern in the oval office? Or John Edwards? I'm sure with just a few minutes, we could flood this thread with examples of a lack of judgement on the left, which you probably have no problem with.
Just as we could flood it with examples of Presidents whe also believed in a creator, and yet who's judgement has been judged by history as exemplary. Lincoln, Washington etc.