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View Full Version : Christmas dinners, whatcha making?



patriot45
12-23-2009, 06:59 PM
Again we are having a holiday at my daughters, its nice to pass off the responsibilities to the next generation! So I just have to make one course. My mom is doing baked ziti with a meat sauce and meatballs and sausages, I'm going to make Italian Wedding Day soup! I love that stuff!

Whats everyone making? I'm sure someone is doing a standing rib roast, probably Rock with a 300lb buffalo rib roast! :D

Rockntractor
12-23-2009, 07:24 PM
The smoke house has been running 24 hours a day for three days full of ham, brisket, chuck,sirloin and deer hind quarters. some of it will get et friday.

Hawkgirl
12-23-2009, 07:30 PM
Christmas Eve at my mom's house and she's doing the fishes (we're italian)

Christmas Day at my house...

Assorted hot and cold antipasto dishes...(mini quiches, puff pastry hordeurves, mozzarella sticks; olives, roasted red peppers, cheeses, sundried tomatoes)
Garlic Bread

Ravioli Marinara

Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin
Sweet Potato Casserole (with maple syrup, marshmallow topping)
Sauteed broccoli with garlic
Mashed Potatoes

Tiramisu (for dessert)


I'm stuffed just writing that...:D

stsinner
12-23-2009, 07:44 PM
We're doing the spiral ham! That's like sliced heaven!

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 07:48 PM
Smörgåsbord (really a julbrod but what's a little Swedish-mangling among friends?). Three courses of cold and warm dishes (served at one time pretty much), dessert and drinks. I also make a pot of chili with chorizo for those who fear herring. :D

Rockntractor
12-23-2009, 08:15 PM
Smörgåsbord (really a julbrod but what's a little Swedish-mangling among friends?). Three courses of cold and warm dishes (served at one time pretty much), dessert and drinks. I also make a pot of chili with chorizo for those who fear herring. :D

Picklled herring?

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 08:18 PM
Picklled herring?

Swedes have about 413 ways to serve herring. Pickled herring will make an appearance among other formats.

patriot45
12-23-2009, 08:21 PM
Swedes have about 413 ways to serve herring. Pickled herring will make an appearance among other formats.

Whats that deadly dish you guys make, something like lukefish or something! I wouldn't try that for anything!

Rockntractor
12-23-2009, 08:29 PM
Swedes have about 413 ways to serve herring. Pickled herring will make an appearance among other formats.
Smoked is okay but i don't like it pickled, my sisters and my mother do. my grandpa used to eat a little every day.

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 08:29 PM
Whats that deadly dish you guys make, something like lukefish or something! I wouldn't try that for anything!

Lutefisk. It's not "deadly". Heck, I've eaten it dozens of times and I'm still alive. It's just cod that's been treated with lye (stop making those gagging sounds). All of the lye is leached out of the fish by the time it lands on your plate. It's almost tasteless which is why people dump butter all over it.

patriot45
12-23-2009, 08:39 PM
Lutefisk. It's not "deadly". Heck, I've eaten it dozens of times and I'm still alive. It's just cod that's been treated with lye (stop making those gagging sounds). All of the lye is leached out of the fish by the time it lands on your plate. It's almost tasteless which is why people dump butter all over it.

I guess the question would be-- Why in hell make this dish!!!!! :confused::D It takes 2 weeks!


Lutefisk is made from dried whitefish (normally cod, but ling is also used), prepared with lye, in a sequence of particular treatments. The watering steps of these treatments differ slightly for salted/dried whitefish because of its high salt content.

The first treatment is to soak the stockfish in cold water for five to six days (with the water changed daily). The saturated stockfish is then soaked in an unchanged solution of cold water and lye for an additional two days. The fish swells during this soaking and its protein content decreases by more than 50 percent, producing its famous jelly-like consistency. When this treatment is finished, the fish (saturated with lye) has a pH value of 11–12, and is therefore caustic. To make the fish edible, a final treatment of yet another four to six days of soaking in cold water (also changed daily) is needed. Eventually, the lutefisk is ready to be cooked.

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 08:52 PM
I guess the question would be-- Why in hell make this dish!!!!! :confused::D It takes 2 weeks!

Clearly, you've never lived in Scandanavia during the Middle Ages. Swedes (and others) had to dry fish for the winter. They had one heck of a lot of fish and they eventually got tired of shaving dried cod into soup or soaking it to make flabby stews. Lutefisk has a completely different texture - it's like fish Jello. It made for a welcome change among people who pretty much lived off soup and dairy.

It's not bad but it's bland for modern tastes. When I make it, I use my MIL's dedicated pans. There's no going back for kitchenware once it's been used for lutefisk.

Rockntractor
12-23-2009, 08:55 PM
Clearly, you've never lived in Scandanavia during the Middle Ages. Swedes (and others) had to dry fish for the winter. They had one heck of a lot of fish and they eventually got tired of shaving dried cod into soup or soaking it to make flabby stews. Lutefisk has a completely different texture - it's like fish Jello. It made for a welcome change among people who pretty much lived off soup and dairy.

It's not bad but it's bland for modern tastes. When I make it, I use my MIL's dedicated pans. There's no going back for kitchenware once it's been used for lutefisk.
I didn't know cod had whiskers!

patriot45
12-23-2009, 09:00 PM
Clearly, you've never lived in Scandanavia during the Middle Ages. Swedes (and others) had to dry fish for the winter. They had one heck of a lot of fish and they eventually got tired of shaving dried cod into soup or soaking it to make flabby stews. Lutefisk has a completely different texture - it's like fish Jello. It made for a welcome change among people who pretty much lived off soup and dairy.

It's not bad but it's bland for modern tastes. When I make it, I use my MIL's dedicated pans. There's no going back for kitchenware once it's been used for lutefisk.

Check it out for a laugh! (http://netnet.net/~pineaire/Lutefisk.html)

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 09:10 PM
Check it out for a laugh! (http://netnet.net/~pineaire/Lutefisk.html)

I'd laugh but Mr. Snaps actually belongs to the local Sons of Norway. We are a "strikingly handsome people" but we don't really dress up in traditional costume. During the winter. :p

patriot45
12-23-2009, 09:11 PM
I'd laugh but Mr. Snaps actually belongs to the local Sons of Norway. We are a "strikingly handsome people" but we don't really dress up in traditional costume. During the winter. :p

:D Just funnin! That was the first lutfisk page that popped up!

Gingersnap
12-23-2009, 09:23 PM
:D Just funnin! That was the first lutfisk page that popped up!

Google "lefsa" for another laugh fest! Seriously, I own an actual lefsa griddle and stick. You're just faking it unless you have a real lefsa stick and know how to use it. :p