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Gingersnap
01-20-2010, 01:55 PM
Note to Tea Partiers: Wake up and Smell the Coffee

Keillor, Garrison
January 19, 2010
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The tea partiers are enjoying their day in the sun, but coffee is the beverage preferred by most Americans, and we don't have time to gang up and holler and wave our arms -- we prefer to sit quietly with coffee in hand and read a reliable newspaper and try to figure out what's going on in the world. Great heaps of dead bodies are moved by front-loaders and dumped, uncounted, unidentified, into open pits in a stricken country while people feast and walk treadmills on enormous cruise ships sailing a hundred miles off the coast en route to the Bahamas and Jamaica. That's the real world, not the paranoid hallucinations of the right.

The problem for Democrats right now is that nobody can explain health-care reform in plain English, 50 words or less. It's all too murky. The price of constructing this intricate web of compromises for the benefit of Republican senators (who then decided to quit the game and sit on their thumbs) is a bill with strange hair and ill-fitting clothes that you hesitate to bring home to Mother. Like all murky stuff, it is liable to strike people as dangerous or unreliable. And demagogues thrive in dim light.

The basic question is simple: Should health care be a basic right or is it a privilege for those who can afford it? Rush says it's a privilege -- pay or die -- and for his colonoscopy, they use a golden probe with a diamond tip, but most Americans agree that health care is basic, like education or decent roads or clean water. Holy Scripture would seem to point us in that direction. And yet the churches, so far as I can see, have chosen to stay aloof from this issue. Churches that feed the hungry and house the homeless dare not offend the conservatives in their midst by suggesting that we also tend the sick. And the opposition has beaten on garbage cans and whooped and yelled and alarmed the populace, which they're quite good at. These people look at a clear blue sky and see a conspiracy.

Much more at the link. I don't quite know how Keillor got a reputation for political/cultural insight. His lake Woebegone stuff amused a large number of people but I always thought it was fairly close to contemptuous. I never got the feeling that Keillor actually liked his fictional characters, I thought he found them useful as a foil for barely disguised hipster sensibility. Keillor is the kind of guy who will talk about you when you leave the room - and he'll have them laughing like loons at your expense.

This piece is typical of his views. He denigrates those who disagree with him and he twists Christianity into a political tool. Like a lot on the left, he's mesmerized by the false dilemma: cruise ships or rescue efforts, gold-plated medical procedures or basic services.

Too bad there's no comment field enabled.

Chicago Trib (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/sns-201001191258tmsgkeillorctngk-a20100119jan19,0,5912997.story)

Nubs
01-20-2010, 02:21 PM
Garrison is an aging hippy who longs for the simple times that was his childhood. The very simple times he and his generation spents their youth and early adulthood vilifying and seeking to destroy. Now he believes that only government can return us to the simple days of old. Problem is, as time progresses, one forgets the troubles and only remembers the good times. Think of the great times one had during your middle school years. Some great memories surrounded by some pretty awful ones. Garrison forgets the awful ones.

coach
01-20-2010, 04:43 PM
whats a reliable newspaper ?

WSJ maybe.


maybe he would be better telling the major political parties to wake up and smell the coffee

swirling_vortex
01-20-2010, 08:04 PM
The tea partiers are enjoying their day in the sun, but coffee is the beverage preferred by most Americans, and we don't have time to gang up and holler and wave our arms -- we prefer to sit quietly with coffee in hand and read a reliable newspaper and try to figure out what's going on in the world. Great heaps of dead bodies are moved by front-loaders and dumped, uncounted, unidentified, into open pits in a stricken country while people feast and walk treadmills on enormous cruise ships sailing a hundred miles off the coast en route to the Bahamas and Jamaica. That's the real world, not the paranoid hallucinations of the right.
You can't compare two entirely separate events and say that they're somehow related. And what do people on cruise ships have to do with the Haiti disaster? Typical liberal "blame capitalism" card.

The problem for Democrats right now is that nobody can explain health-care reform in plain English, 50 words or less. It's all too murky.
That's what all bureaucracy is like. You can't expect government services to run in a streamlined manner.

The price of constructing this intricate web of compromises for the benefit of Republican senators (who then decided to quit the game and sit on their thumbs) is a bill with strange hair and ill-fitting clothes that you hesitate to bring home to Mother. Like all murky stuff, it is liable to strike people as dangerous or unreliable. And demagogues thrive in dim light.
Actually, the Republicans made it clear from the beginning that they weren't going to vote for it. Those "handouts" are going to feed your own Democratic friends so that they'll vote for this bill. Otherwise, this bill wouldn't even get 51 votes. I will agree that the bill is a disaster.

The basic question is simple: Should health care be a basic right or is it a privilege for those who can afford it? Rush says it's a privilege -- pay or die -- and for his colonoscopy, they use a golden probe with a diamond tip, but most Americans agree that health care is basic, like education or decent roads or clean water.
Again, another liberal mis-statement. Do we have a federal water sanitation system? Do we have one federal DOT system maintaining our roads? Do we have a federal education system? For the most part, no. Those systems are all managed by the states, which is perfectly fine since the Constitution grants them that power. Of course, education has been federalized quite a bit with significant money thrown at it and it hasn't garnished results. And even those mentioned systems aren't a "right", you still have to pay taxes on them.

Do you want government health care? Bug your own state to do it. Don't penalize me.

Holy Scripture would seem to point us in that direction. And yet the churches, so far as I can see, have chosen to stay aloof from this issue. Churches that feed the hungry and house the homeless dare not offend the conservatives in their midst by suggesting that we also tend the sick. And the opposition has beaten on garbage cans and whooped and yelled and alarmed the populace, which they're quite good at. These people look at a clear blue sky and see a conspiracy.
Because churches operate on charity. Unlike the government, they have a much better incentive of getting people on their feet. Jesus told us to be compassionate and giving, but he didn't go to the Roman government and demand that they provide free services.

Swampfox
01-20-2010, 11:37 PM
Health care cannot be a "right" unless you completely redefine what a right is.

Rockntractor
01-20-2010, 11:38 PM
Health care cannot be a "right" unless you completely redefine what a right is.

Thats right!

Articulate_Ape
01-20-2010, 11:54 PM
Apparently, Garrison Keillor has spent too little time on the prairie lately to make it his home companion.

lacarnut
01-21-2010, 12:47 AM
Thats right!

As usual, you are Right.:)

The Tea Partiers need to take over the Repub party. Need to get some new blood in there.