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View Full Version : The Sooner Marriage, the Better: 88% of Women's Eggs Gone by Age 30



megimoo
02-02-2010, 06:17 PM
A new study from the Universities of St. Andrews and of Edinburgh is offering a more accurate understanding of fertility and its decline with age, which researchers say is steeper than previously thought.

The study, which involved about 325 women of different ages from the United States and Europe, investigated the number of eggs that remain in the ovaries over time. This number, said the researchers, peaks at about 20 weeks after conception and subsequently drops until no eggs are left at menopause.

At the age of 30 years, only 12% of the maximum ovarian reserve - the number of eggs with which women are born - is typically present; by 40, only 3% remains.The average egg quality also decreases with age, which increases the difficulty of conception and the chances of an unhealthy baby.

"Women lose eggs a lot faster than we thought," said Good Morning America medical contributor Dr. Marie Savard. She pointed out that women need to hear that the biological clock runs fairly quickly, and that the chances of having children are jeopardized the longer one waits.
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http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2010/feb/10020113.html

Gingersnap
02-03-2010, 09:50 AM
Interesting. This wasn't my particular problem but I sure know a lot of women who have this problem. The Women's Movement didn't do the average gal any favors by telling her that fertility isn't an issue "for most women" until after 40. The celebutard media hasn't helped either when they stay quiet about how all these geriatric Moms pop out twins at the age 40 or 43. Now I see that some college women with money are freezing their eggs for future use. Sadly, the in vitro success rate with fresh material is extremely low but with frozen eggs it's almost nil. Eggs don't freeze anywhere near as well as sperm.

Fertility aside, I wonder about the fruits of delaying parenthood until middle age (for women). Old parents are usually more patient but they're also less less active, tire more easily, and are more out of touch with kid life. Then you have the problem of dealing with severe parental health or lifestyle issues just at the time when young adults should be focusing on their own families.

It's sad. I must know 4 or 5 women who've thrown thousands of dollars at fertility treatments during their 30s. I know of only one who conceived and carried a child to term. :(

Rockntractor
02-03-2010, 10:03 AM
If you want to raise chickens you need to keep young hens!

megimoo
02-03-2010, 10:16 AM
Interesting. This wasn't my particular problem but I sure know a lot of women who have this problem. The Women's Movement didn't do the average gal any favors by telling her that fertility isn't an issue "for most women" until after 40. The celebutard media hasn't helped either when they stay quiet about how all these geriatric Moms pop out twins at the age 40 or 43. Now I see that some college women with money are freezing their eggs for future use. Sadly, the in vitro success rate with fresh material is extremely low but with frozen eggs it's almost nil. Eggs don't freeze anywhere near as well as sperm.

Fertility aside, I wonder about the fruits of delaying parenthood until middle age (for women). Old parents are usually more patient but they're also less less active, tire more easily, and are more out of touch with kid life. Then you have the problem of dealing with severe parental health or lifestyle issues just at the time when young adults should be focusing on their own families.

It's sad. I must know 4 or 5 women who've thrown thousands of dollars at fertility treatments during their 30s. I know of only one who conceived and carried a child to term. :(They trade off youths short term happiness for long term regret.In the long term there's nothing like having a large family with young kids around you during Thanksgiving and Christmas,they are the joy of life!

noonwitch
02-03-2010, 11:45 AM
I've never had a baby because I've never been married, and now that I'm 45, it's still possible. It's just not optimal. If I did get married, we'd probably do better adopting a couple of teenagers, since most people my age have kids who are now teens. But accidents happen-one of my uncles is only 7 years older than me, and is younger than one of my first cousins on that side of the family.

Most women can bear healthy children when they are in their 30s. Both of my siblings waited until they were in their 30s to settle down and raise rugrats. Couples are more settled and have more income at that point, and can put more money aside for the kids' educations. My sister does comment on how much older she and her husband are than the other parents at their kids' school.