PDA

View Full Version : Lindsay Lohan's secret life as a hoarder (Look away Ginger)



bijou
02-06-2010, 04:52 AM
Once one of the most feted child stars of her generation, today Lindsay Lohan's troubles are well known.

At just 23 years old, her volatile relationships, rift with her father and worries about her use of prescription drugs fill the tabloids.

But behind closed doors the actress has been hiding another concerning issue. She is a secret hoarder - her luxury Los Angeles home is filled to the rafters with expensive but discarded purchases.

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE VIDEO FOOTAGE...

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1248353/Lindsay-Lohans-secret-life-hoarder-Stars-house-crammed-clothes-shoes.html#ixzz0ekQvV6LG
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/04/article-1248353-08269495000005DC-787_468x261.jpg


http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/03/article-0-08256613000005DC-342_468x248.jpg

This will soon be on TV, I can't wait. I am not the tidiest person in the world but this would drive me mad.

jendf
02-06-2010, 03:30 PM
I still remember seeing her in the Parent Trap remake and thinking that girl would go far in the business. She was really adorable in the film. It's a shame she took a wrong turn somewhere and headed down the path she's currently on. I hope she can get things straightened out eventually.

Gingersnap
02-08-2010, 09:50 AM
Color me "unsurprised". They say about 5% of population are hoarders.

ralph wiggum
02-08-2010, 11:05 AM
Color me "unsurprised". They say about 5% of population are hoarders.

5%? :eek:

Gingersnap
02-08-2010, 11:12 AM
5%? :eek:

At least. Some estimates put it at 10% but I don't know what the criteria are for that. I'm glad to see that a lot of people working in this field are starting to move away from dumping hoarding in with OCD. I had heard that hoarders were more or less unaffected by CBT (which works well on OCD) and the whole concept just always seemed counter-intuitive to me.

An OCD hoarder (and I'm sure there are some) would have everything sorted, boxed and color-coded. They might keep over-buying food or clothing but I just can't see someone with OCD randomly collecting food wrappers and shoving them all into a bedroom. It never made any sense to me.

bijou
02-08-2010, 11:59 AM
At least. Some estimates put it at 10% but I don't know what the criteria are for that. I'm glad to see that a lot of people working in this field are starting to move away from dumping hoarding in with OCD. I had heard that hoarders were more or less unaffected by CBT (which works well on OCD) and the whole concept just always seemed counter-intuitive to me.

An OCD hoarder (and I'm sure there are some) would have everything sorted, boxed and color-coded. They might keep over-buying food or clothing but I just can't see someone with OCD randomly collecting food wrappers and shoving them all into a bedroom. It never made any sense to me.

Seems to me that hoarders are more about filling an emotional void with material goods, whether of value - in which case the emotional void is partly filled by the spending of money - or of the goods themselves which may to an outside observer be trash.

Gingersnap
02-08-2010, 12:49 PM
Seems to me that hoarders are more about filling an emotional void with material goods, whether of value - in which case the emotional void is partly filled by the spending of money - or of the goods themselves which may to an outside observer be trash.

True. OCD is all about reducing immediate anxiety. Even the clean-freak aspects of OCD are about managing your personal environment to the point where it can't become intrusive and then trigger anxiety. At least, that's the concept. Of course, the management itself can start to become a source of anxiety if you don't learn to back it off. :(

In these hoarder shows I've seen I'm always struck by the relationship between apparent trash and memories that seem to come up. It's as though getting rid of objects means destroying the memories related to the objects. Often these memories seem to relate to parents, dead spouses, or children.

Speaking for myself, although I recognize the sentimental value of a few objects, losing those objects wouldn't impair any memories related to the objects. I'd still have those. It would be more important for me to not worry about an object than to keep it for sentimental reasons. If the objects interfered with the function or stress-level of my house, they'd have to go regardless of the memories.

This is one of the reasons why hoarding seems to foreign so my mindset. I've heard it said that hoarding is a sign of failed perfectionism as part of OCD but I don't know about that. There's a perfectionistic component to OCD but not one strong enough to prevent most of us from removing trash or spoiled food from our homes. It just doesn't add up for me (hah, hah!).

linda22003
02-08-2010, 12:52 PM
In these hoarder shows I've seen I'm always struck by the relationship between apparent trash and memories that seem to come up. It's as though getting rid of objects means destroying the memories related to the objects. Often these memories seem to relate to parents, dead spouses, or children.


I watch that "Hoarders" show like a slow motion traffic accident. I think I watch it for the same reason I watch Dave Ramsey: "Look how screwed up people can let their lives get. Good thing it can't happen here."

The related "precious memories" seems to be a much more female-related trait than a male one. I brought back some personal things of my mother's from my parents' house right after my mother died, and I couldn't stand to unpack them for about a year. But that was one SUITCASE, not five or six rooms stacked several feet high. :eek:

Gingersnap
02-08-2010, 01:06 PM
I watch that "Hoarders" show like a slow motion traffic accident. I think I watch it for the same reason I watch Dave Ramsey: "Look how screwed up people can let their lives get. Good thing it can't happen here."

The related "precious memories" seems to be a much more female-related trait than a male one. I brought back some personal things of my mother's from my parents' house right after my mother died, and I couldn't stand to unpack them for about a year. But that was one SUITCASE, not five or six rooms stacked several feet high. :eek:

I think it's an equal opportunity thing. There aren't as many male hoarders as female hoarders but they seem to have the same issues. I think there's also a distinction between real hoarders who have the object = memories thing going on and people who are just too overwhelmed to clean. I'm thinking of the animal collector types. With those people it seems like caring for the critters just seems to suck up all the time and so the trash piles up. Their emotional attachments seem to just be with the animals, not with any of the objects.

linda22003
02-08-2010, 01:30 PM
Animal collectors.... on yesterday afternoon's show they cleaned out a house and kept finding old bodies of cats that were not only very deceased, but very FLAT.... under a lot of stuff. The woman who owned the house had assumed they had just wandered away.

noonwitch
02-08-2010, 02:11 PM
My grandma was a hoarder (although not of animals). I've had some clients who were, over the years. The thing is, there is usually an underlying condition and the hoarding is just a symptom. Most of my clients who hoarded were clinically depressed and had stopped taking their medication. My grandma's hoarding was an early symptom of senility.