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Rockntractor
02-11-2010, 10:47 PM
The Origins of Political Correctness
Bill Lind, February 5, 2000

An Accuracy in Academia Address by Bill Lind

Variations of this speech have been delivered to various AIA conferences including the 2000 Consevative University at American University

Where does all this stuff that you’ve heard about this morning – the victim feminism, the gay rights movement, the invented statistics, the rewritten history, the lies, the demands, all the rest of it – where does it come from? For the first time in our history, Americans have to be fearful of what they say, of what they write, and of what they think. They have to be afraid of using the wrong word, a word denounced as offensive or insensitive, or racist, sexist, or homophobic.

We have seen other countries, particularly in this century, where this has been the case. And we have always regarded them with a mixture of pity, and to be truthful, some amusement, because it has struck us as so strange that people would allow a situation to develop where they would be afraid of what words they used. But we now have this situation in this country. We have it primarily on college campuses, but it is spreading throughout the whole society. Were does it come from? What is it?

We call it “Political Correctness.” The name originated as something of a joke, literally in a comic strip, and we tend still to think of it as only half-serious. In fact, it’s deadly serious. It is the great disease of our century, the disease that has left tens of millions of people dead in Europe, in Russia, in China, indeed around the world. It is the disease of ideology. PC is not funny. PC is deadly serious.

If we look at it analytically, if we look at it historically, we quickly find out exactly what it is. Political Correctness is cultural Marxism. It is Marxism translated from economic into cultural terms. It is an effort that goes back not to the 1960s and the hippies and the peace movement, but back to World War I. If we compare the basic tenets of Political Correctness with classical Marxism the parallels are very obvious.

First of all, both are totalitarian ideologies. The totalitarian nature of Political Correctness is revealed nowhere more clearly than on college campuses, many of which at this point are small ivy covered North Koreas, where the student or faculty member who dares to cross any of the lines set up by the gender feminist or the homosexual-rights activists, or the local black or Hispanic group, or any of the other sainted “victims” groups that PC revolves around, quickly find themselves in judicial trouble. Within the small legal system of the college, they face formal charges – some star-chamber proceeding – and punishment. That is a little look into the future that Political Correctness intends for the nation as a whole.

Indeed, all ideologies are totalitarian because the essence of an ideology (I would note that conservatism correctly understood is not an ideology) is to take some philosophy and say on the basis of this philosophy certain things must be true – such as the whole of the history of our culture is the history of the oppression of women. Since reality contradicts that, reality must be forbidden. It must become forbidden to acknowledge the reality of our history. People must be forced to live a lie, and since people are naturally reluctant to live a lie, they naturally use their ears and eyes to look out and say, “Wait a minute. This isn’t true. I can see it isn’t true,” the power of the state must be put behind the demand to live a lie. That is why ideology invariably creates a totalitarian state.
Mo>http://www.academia.org/the-origins-of-political-correctness/

Gingersnap
02-12-2010, 09:55 AM
Mao was a big fan of "political correctness", also of starving millions of people to death in the name of ideology.

noonwitch
02-12-2010, 03:01 PM
I don't consider it political correctness when I avoid using derogatory terms to describe people by race, gender, sexual orientation or whatever. I consider it good manners. Choosing not to call a black person by the n word isn't a matter of political correctness to me, it's a matter of common courtesy.


Like anything else, some people take it to an extreme and it becomes a political agenda instead of being about treating people with respect. The idiots who want to ban Huckleberry Finn from school libraries because racist white characters talk in racist dialogue are a good example of that kind of stupidity, as are people who say that criticizing Islam for the treatment of women in the muslim world somehow equates with hatred for muslims.

Jfor
02-12-2010, 03:22 PM
I don't consider it political correctness when I avoid using derogatory terms to describe people by race, gender, sexual orientation or whatever. I consider it good manners. Choosing not to call a black person by the n word isn't a matter of political correctness to me, it's a matter of common courtesy.


Like anything else, some people take it to an extreme and it becomes a political agenda instead of being about treating people with respect. The idiots who want to ban Huckleberry Finn from school libraries because racist white characters talk in racist dialogue are a good example of that kind of stupidity, as are people who say that criticizing Islam for the treatment of women in the muslim world somehow equates with hatred for muslims.

You probably agree with calling a trash collector a sanitation engineer or a secretary an executive assistant all in the name of making them feel better about their jobs.

PoliCon
02-12-2010, 03:43 PM
PC is an attempt to silence dissent by labeling it as offensive.

Jfor
02-12-2010, 04:08 PM
PC is an attempt to silence dissent by labeling it as offensive.

QFT

noonwitch
02-12-2010, 04:50 PM
You probably agree with calling a trash collector a sanitation engineer or a secretary an executive assistant all in the name of making them feel better about their jobs.


It's no skin off my back to do so, so yes, at least for the garbage collector. In my experience, an executive assistant is a different job than a secretary, and has far more duties than just typing documents, filing and answering the phone.