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CaughtintheMiddle1990
02-24-2010, 05:04 AM
Hi

I have a condition, a heart condition specifically, which is specifically outlined in the Military Medical code as being disqualifying, but the condition isn't from a medical standpoint life threatening at all. It causes me to have tachycardia (my heart can go up to 150 beats per minute without medication while resting), but is controlled with medication and stays at a normal rate on it. With medication I get no attacks of it whatsoever and can exercise regularly.


I'm wondering if there's any way to get around this because I'd really like to serve. I'd feel horrible if I couldn't...My dad served (and he served after being denied once before for Hypertension), both my grandfathers (and my maternal grandpa was allowed to continue serve after contracting Malaria while stationed in Panama prior to WWII and was even sent into combat in Europe later) served, and a great grandfather did as well and I'd like to continue the proud tradition.

marv
02-24-2010, 08:46 AM
I don't think it's the tachycardia so much as the need for medication.

Gingersnap
02-24-2010, 10:30 AM
I swiped this from Yahoo Answers (not the best source, I know, but it was sourced):


Current or history of supraventricular tachycardia is disqualifying unless there has been no recurrence within the past two years while you have been free of medication to control it. The source below is the medical standard.

Source(s):
AR 40-501: Standards of Medical Fitness, para. 2-18 (c) (1)

CaughtintheMiddle1990
02-24-2010, 12:54 PM
I swiped this from Yahoo Answers (not the best source, I know, but it was sourced):

That is exactly my condition. I guess I'll slowly taper off my medication and see what happens and try to get it electrically ablated--where the arrythmia is induced and destroyed by playing with the heart's electrical rhythm.

Gingersnap
02-24-2010, 12:58 PM
That is exactly my condition. I guess I'll slowly taper off my medication and see what happens and try to get it electrically ablated--where the arrythmia is induced and destroyed by playing with the heart's electrical rhythm.

Well, you know what you want to do but I'd do the "tapering off" part with a doctor's supervision. ;)

CaughtintheMiddle1990
02-24-2010, 01:57 PM
I swiped this from Yahoo Answers (not the best source, I know, but it was sourced):


Well, you know what you want to do but I'd do the "tapering off" part with a doctor's supervision. ;)

Of course.