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linda22003
02-26-2010, 08:28 AM
Grey and very windy in the DC area this morning, but at least we seem to have dodged snow this time.

TOTD: Having spent a week in (seemingly) every museum in Paris, I have come away with some indelible images, such as sculptures in the Musee d'Orsay. "Nature Unveils Herself to Science" is the ungainly title of this statue, and the combination of marble and onyx is fabulous. The multicolored onyx really does seem like a patterned silk, even when you are standing close to it.
Post some of your favorite artworks.

http://www.linternaute.com/musee/image_musee/540/56420_1029827062.jpg

PoliCon
02-26-2010, 08:40 AM
Two of my favorite artists are William Adolphe Bouguereau and C.M. Dudash.

Bouguereau is noted for works such as - The Abduction of Psyche
http://www.goodart.org/wbpsych.jpg

And - The first Kiss
http://www.goodart.org/wbkiss.jpg

My favorite though is this one:

http://www.goodart.org/wbsong.jpg

I love the photo realism of his work.

http://www.goodart.org/artofwb.htm

C.M. Dudash on the otherhand - has a very different style:

http://www.cmdudash.com/ I'd post pics - but his are all locked.

Jumpy
02-26-2010, 08:45 AM
I love Maxfield Parrish and was fortunate enough to view some originals at a gallery in Phila. Stunning colors, and the prints don't do him justice.

http://vbonnaire.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/parrish_ecstasy.jpg

Taken from WIKI- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxfield_Parrish

Parrish's art features dazzlingly luminous colors; the color Parrish blue was named in acknowledgement. He achieved the results by means of a technique called glazing where bright layers of oil color separated by varnish are applied alternately over a base rendering (Parrish usually used a blue and white monochromatic underpainting).

He would build up the depth in his paintings by photographing, enlarging, projecting and tracing half- or full-size objects or figures. Parrish then cut out and placed the images on his canvas, covering them with thick, but clear, layers of glaze. The result is realism of elegiac vivacity. His work achieves a unique three-dimensional appearance, which does not translate well to coffee table books.

Parrish devised many innovative techniques which no other major artist has successfully copied. A technique which Parrish used frequently involved creating a large piece of cloth with a geometric pattern in stark black-and-white (such as alternate black and white squares, or a regular pattern of black circles on a white background). A human model (often Parrish himself) would then pose for a photograph with this cloth draped naturally on his or her body in a manner which intentionally distorted the pattern. Parrish would develop a transparency of the photo, then project this onto the canvas of his current work in progress. Using black graphite on the white canvas, Parrish would painstakingly trace and fill in all the black portions of the projected photo. The result was astonishing: in the finished painting, a human figure would be seen wearing a distinctive geometrically-patterned cloth which draped realistically and accurately.

BadCat
02-26-2010, 08:55 AM
http://ifmomsaysok.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/blog_candyo.jpg

FlaGator
02-26-2010, 09:30 AM
I am a major fan of Dali, this is one of the ones I love the most.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b26/flagator/toreador.jpg

Rebel Yell
02-26-2010, 09:43 AM
http://i318.photobucket.com/albums/mm439/chewbacca4play/dogs_playing_poker.jpg

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 10:46 AM
It's cold and clear with a lot of new snow.

TOTD: Frederic Lord Leighton's Flaming June -

http://i45.tinypic.com/33m252e.jpg

Rockntractor
02-26-2010, 10:52 AM
Grey and very windy in the DC area this morning, but at least we seem to have dodged snow this time.

TOTD: Having spent a week in (seemingly) every museum in Paris, I have come away with some indelible images, such as sculptures in the Musee d'Orsay. "Nature Unveils Herself to Science" is the ungainly title of this statue, and the combination of marble and onyx is fabulous. The multicolored onyx really does seem like a patterned silk, even when you are standing close to it.
Post some of your favorite artworks.

http://www.linternaute.com/musee/image_musee/540/56420_1029827062.jpg

Did they stop your husband at any of the museums as you were leaving them and ask him why he was trying to remove an ancient statue?:confused::D

Rebel Yell
02-26-2010, 10:58 AM
http://i476.photobucket.com/albums/rr127/sadlands/billybass.jpg

linda22003
02-26-2010, 12:01 PM
It's cold and clear with a lot of new snow.

TOTD: Frederic Lord Leighton's Flaming June -



I LOVE "Flaming June" and have the exhibit poster of it from the big show on "The Victorians" several years ago. In 1960, it sold for ninety pounds because Victorian art was so out of fashion. (It sold again a few years later for rather more, but still a manageable amount). Hell, I was five years old in 1960, and even I could have gotten my hands on ninety pounds. :cool:

linda22003
02-26-2010, 12:06 PM
Another wonderful Leighton painting is "The Return of Persephone", Demeter welcoming her daughter back from the underworld, pale and blinded from her time in the dark.

http://wintermute71.tripod.com/images/Leighton/TheReturnOfPersephone.jpg

Rockntractor
02-26-2010, 12:11 PM
Another wonderful Leighton painting is "The Return of Persephone", Demeter welcoming her daughter back from the underworld, pale and blinded from her time in the dark.

http://wintermute71.tripod.com/images/Leighton/TheReturnOfPersephone.jpg

The way they blend the green and blue dot is nice, with tripod for a spectacular finish!

linda22003
02-26-2010, 12:12 PM
Did they stop your husband at any of the museums as you were leaving them and ask him why he was trying to remove an ancient statue?:confused::D

No, there was no problem with that. Some of the artwork was rather stunning though, in the literal sense. Gustave Courbet's "The Origin of the World" was one example. I'll just link to it, since even in this day and age I don't think it would be appreciated if I copied the picture here. Imagine how shocking this would have been to a mixed audience in a public gallery in 1866, when it was first shown.

http://www.1st-art-gallery.com/thumbnail/169688/1/The-Origin-Of-The-World.jpg

Apache
02-26-2010, 12:39 PM
No, there was no problem with that. Some of the artwork was rather stunning though, in the literal sense. Gustave Courbet's "The Origin of the World" was one example. I'll just link to it, since even in this day and age I don't think it would be appreciated if I copied the picture here. Imagine how shocking this would have been to a mixed audience in a public gallery in 1866, when it was first shown.

http://www.1st-art-gallery.com/thumbnail/169688/1/The-Origin-Of-The-World.jpg

What's so shocking about a picture of Willie Nelson...:confused:




:D:p

Jumpy
02-26-2010, 12:56 PM
No, there was no problem with that. Some of the artwork was rather stunning though, in the literal sense. Gustave Courbet's "The Origin of the World" was one example. I'll just link to it, since even in this day and age I don't think it would be appreciated if I copied the picture here. Imagine how shocking this would have been to a mixed audience in a public gallery in 1866, when it was first shown.

http://www.1st-art-gallery.com/thumbnail/169688/1/The-Origin-Of-The-World.jpg

That reminds me of Mark Twain and his opinion on "Venus of Urbino", in his "The Tramp Abroad" book.


At the door of the Uffizzi, in Florence, one is confronted by statues of a man and a woman, noseless, battered, black with accumulated grime--they hardly suggest human beings-- yet these ridiculous creatures have been thoughtfully and conscientiously fig-leaved by this fastidious generation. You enter, and proceed to that most-visited little gallery that exists in the world--the Tribune--and there, against the wall, without obstructing rag or leaf, you may look your fill upon the foulest, the vilest, the obscenest picture the world possesses--Titian`s Venus. It isn`t that she is naked and stretched out on a bed--no, it is the attitude of one of her arms and hand. If I ventured to describe that attitude, there would be a fine howl--but there the Venus lies, for anybody to gloat over that wants to--and there she has a right to lie, for she is a work of art, and Art has its privileges. I saw young girls stealing furtive glances at her; I saw young men gaze long and absorbedly at her; I saw aged, infirm men hang upon her charms with a pathetic interest. How I should like to describe her--just to see what a holy indignation I could stir up in the world--just to hear the unreflecting average man deliver himself about my grossness and coarseness, and all that. The world says that no worded description of a moving spectacle is a hundredth part as moving as the same spectacle seen with one`s own eyes--yet the world is willing to let its son and its daughter and itself look at Titian`s beast, but won`t stand a description of it in words. Which shows that the world is not as consistent as it might be.

There are pictures of nude women which suggest no impure thought--I am well aware of that. I am not railing at such. What I am trying to emphasize is the fact that Titian`s Venus is very far from being one of that sort. Without any question it was painted for a bagnio and it was probably refused because it was a trifle too strong. In truth, it is too strong for any place but a public Art Gallery. Titian has two Venuses in the Tribune; persons who have seen them will easily remember which one I am referring to.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/ba/Tizian_102.jpg/300px-Tizian_102.jpg

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 02:03 PM
This one?

http://i45.tinypic.com/ncgrag.jpg

PoliCon
02-26-2010, 02:05 PM
What's so shocking about a picture of Willie Nelson...:confused:




:D:p

dude needs a trim!;)

linda22003
02-26-2010, 02:12 PM
This one?



Yes - they looked fine when I put them up, then disappeared.

Eagle
02-26-2010, 08:31 PM
While you were in Musee d'Orsay I hope that you didn't overlook the sculptures by Rodin and Carpeaux or the paintings by Monet, Renoir or Van Gogh.

Shannon
02-26-2010, 08:43 PM
All of the women look fat to me.;)

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 09:01 PM
All of the women look fat to me.;)

The models were all French. You know how those people eat. :D

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 10:34 PM
More art goodness:

http://i46.tinypic.com/xdshol.jpg

Rockntractor
02-26-2010, 10:37 PM
More art goodness:

http://i46.tinypic.com/xdshol.jpg

Red haired is good but too much clothes!

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 10:41 PM
Sentimental but awesome in a dog way:

http://i45.tinypic.com/23k4xes.jpg

Doc looks pretty much exactly like that. :)

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 10:55 PM
It's Friday so something for the boyz:

http://i50.tinypic.com/aw85g0.jpg

Rockntractor
02-26-2010, 10:56 PM
It's Friday so something for the boyz:

http://i50.tinypic.com/aw85g0.jpg

Lord have mercy!:o

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 10:56 PM
Why even indiffernet Victorian artists are 5000 times better than really good abstract artists:

http://i48.tinypic.com/2lma3bs.jpg

Jumpy
02-26-2010, 10:59 PM
More art goodness:

http://i46.tinypic.com/xdshol.jpg

Waterhouse, right?

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 11:08 PM
Waterhouse, right?

Did I say that a pop quiz was involved? :D

Gingersnap
02-26-2010, 11:22 PM
http://i47.tinypic.com/4pw65x.jpg