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megimoo
03-06-2010, 03:15 PM
ACLU demands female student be allowed to take girlfriend, wear tuxedo to prom

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition have sent a letter demanding that Itawamba County School District officials reverse their decision to forbid a lesbian student from attending prom with her girlfriend and from wearing a tuxedo to the prom.

Constance McMillen, a student at Itawamba Agricultural High School, said that school officials told her that she could not arrive at the prom with her girlfriend, also a student at IAHS, and that they might be thrown out if any other students complained about their presence. In addition, she was told that she would not be allowed to wear a tuxedo to the April 2 event.

“Prom is one of those high school moments everyone should get to experience and enjoy. I didn’t go to prom last year, so this is my only chance to go,” said McMillen, an 18-year-old senior at the school in Fulton, a small town of about 3,900 in the northeastern corner of Mississippi. “We just want to be able to be ourselves at our own prom.”

In its letter to Itawamba County School District officials, the ACLU cited federal court cases guaranteeing students’ First Amendment right to bring same-sex dates to school dances, and also pointed out that treating McMillen and other lesbian, gay, and bisexual students differently from other students violates the Constitution’s equal protection guarantees. In addition to illegally barring McMillen and her girlfriend from attending the prom together, the ACLU said that the school further violated McMillen’s free expression rights by telling her that she can’t wear a tuxedo to the prom.

The ACLU and the Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition have given the school district until March 10 to respond to their letter.

Not only do prom dress codes and same-sex date restrictions unfairly restrict LGBT students, but they can also affect other students as well. Some students cannot afford the expected prom attire, and those who do not have dates could be prevented from attending with friends.


http://www.examiner.com/x-12237-Transgender--Transsexual-Issues-Examiner~y2010m3d5-ACLU-demands-female-student-be-allowed-to-take-girlfriend-wear-tuxedo-to-prom

Eagle
03-06-2010, 04:14 PM
Cancel the prom and plan a private formal. Either that or tell the ACLU to go F__ its sself.

Apache
03-06-2010, 04:39 PM
I wasn't aware that the First Amendment covered things such as types of dress or dates...:rolleyes:


Amazing what the Left thinks the Constitution protects....

PoliCon
03-06-2010, 04:45 PM
I wasn't aware that the First Amendment covered things such as types of dress or dates...:rolleyes:


Amazing what the Left thinks the Constitution protects....

You're talking about people who feel that they have a right to government funded health care so . . . . :rolleyes:

stsinner
03-06-2010, 08:17 PM
I can't recall the last time the ACLU was on the right side of an issue.. They seem to side with the immoral with every opportunity...

Gingersnap
03-06-2010, 08:20 PM
I've never heard of restrictions on who can attend a prom. Unless things have changed a lot, plenty of people just go stag (male and female both). The clothing issue is laughable. Women are supposed to wear vaguely formal dresses (which doesn't mean much) and men wear a tux or a suit or at least real shoes and a tie.

Renting a tux isn't less expensive than buying a dress.

Proms have lost their very pointed heterosexual function as "practice" social events.

JB
03-06-2010, 09:33 PM
Are they both hot? Then fine.

Otherwise no because it's just gross.

NJCardFan
03-06-2010, 11:36 PM
I wasn't aware that the First Amendment covered things such as types of dress or dates...:rolleyes:


Amazing what the Left thinks the Constitution protects....

Well, they certainly don't believe it protects conservative talk radio.


I can't recall the last time the ACLU was on the right side of an issue.. They seem to side with the immoral with every opportunity...

The ACLU is so convoluted that I sided with PeTA in a case where the both were fighting.

djones520
03-06-2010, 11:51 PM
I've never heard of restrictions on who can attend a prom. Unless things have changed a lot, plenty of people just go stag (male and female both). The clothing issue is laughable. Women are supposed to wear vaguely formal dresses (which doesn't mean much) and men wear a tux or a suit or at least real shoes and a tie.

Renting a tux isn't less expensive than buying a dress.

Proms have lost their very pointed heterosexual function as "practice" social events.

My school did have restrictions on it. We had a couple open bi/homo sexual students in our school, but no big deal was made of it.

Going stag won't help much if your girlfriend/boyfriend doesn't go to that school.

PoliCon
03-07-2010, 12:30 AM
Proms have lost their very pointed heterosexual function as "practice" social events.Very true. They're all about the sex now.

Rockntractor
03-07-2010, 12:33 AM
Very true. They're all about the sex now.
We knew all about the sex way back then too. Where do you think you came from, I'm thinking back seat of an AMC Pacer or something similar!

djones520
03-07-2010, 12:34 AM
Very true. They're all about the sex now.

When were they not? It's been like that just about all my 25 years.

PoliCon
03-07-2010, 12:36 AM
When were they not? It's been like that just about all my 25 years.

back when ginger was in school. you know 1770 something . . . .:D

djones520
03-07-2010, 12:40 AM
I didn't get to attend my Prom. My date to the Junior Prom was told she couldn't go by her guardians, and I was in Basic Training during my Senior Prom.

I did get to go to my girlfriends Senior Prom when I was 19. She was definitely the envy of every other girl there with a man in uniform on her arm. :D

PoliCon
03-07-2010, 12:52 AM
I didn't get to attend my Prom. My date to the Junior Prom was told she couldn't go by her guardians, and I was in Basic Training during my Senior Prom.

I did get to go to my girlfriends Senior Prom when I was 19. She was definitely the envy of every other girl there with a man in uniform on her arm. :D

I didn't go to my prom either. Wasn't safe for me at the time. I went to one of my girlfriends prom - in Fox Chapel. One of the uber highend neighborhood around here . . . .

Apache
03-07-2010, 03:26 PM
back when ginger was in school. you know 1770 something . . . .:D

Dead man walking... :eek::p

stsinner
03-07-2010, 04:10 PM
The ACLU is so convoluted that I sided with PeTA in a case where the both were fighting.

And that is saying something!

megimoo
03-07-2010, 04:14 PM
We knew all about the sex way back then too. Where do you think you came from, I'm thinking back seat of an AMC Pacer or something similar!The rumble seat in a model 'T',Actually it was a Lincoln 1947 Zypher metallic bronze with chrome hubcaps and dual carburetors.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLQazR7T6ws

PoliCon
03-07-2010, 06:44 PM
We knew all about the sex way back then too. Where do you think you came from, I'm thinking back seat of an AMC Pacer or something similar!

Actually . . . No. :p I was conceived at home. TYVM.

noonwitch
03-08-2010, 09:02 AM
One of my cohorts wore a tux to prom. She went with a male, who also wore a tux. We thought it would have been funnier if he had gone in drag, but that wasn't really her statement. She just was one of those girls who hated dresses, and wouldn't wear one even for prom.


We didn't have any openly gay couples. Most of the guys I knew who are now gay were still either trying to be straight or just pretending until they got the hell out of Grand Rapids after graduation, so they found girls to bring to prom. As this is Grand Rapids in 1982, I think my public school would have told a gay couple "no" to prom attendance. But I think most gay couples would have found a way to creatively double date or something to be under the radar in those circumstances.

Audrey01
04-08-2010, 02:43 AM
This whole situation has me torn. One the one hand, I find what these people did to this girl horrid and deplorable, and I would love to see some justice done. But on the other side, if this "real" prom was put together by the parents, then it's a private party and they can invite whoever they choose. I have to wonder what kind of civil action could be taken.

NJCardFan
04-08-2010, 11:44 AM
This whole situation has me torn. One the one hand, I find what these people did to this girl horrid and deplorable, and I would love to see some justice done. But on the other side, if this "real" prom was put together by the parents, then it's a private party and they can invite whoever they choose. I have to wonder what kind of civil action could be taken.

If it is the latter, none.

FlaGator
04-08-2010, 12:07 PM
This whole situation has me torn. One the one hand, I find what these people did to this girl horrid and deplorable, and I would love to see some justice done. But on the other side, if this "real" prom was put together by the parents, then it's a private party and they can invite whoever they choose. I have to wonder what kind of civil action could be taken.

What did they do to this girl? It seems to me that all they did to her was explain to her what their standard is and expected her to comply with it. How is that "horrid adn deplorable"?

Gingersnap
04-08-2010, 12:36 PM
What did they do to this girl? It seems to me that all they did to her was explain to her what their standard is and expected her to comply with it. How is that "horrid adn deplorable"?

I think she's talking about the actual execution of the prom. Students (and presumably parents) found a venue for the prom and got it all organized outside the school. There was another community prom held at a country club. The lesbian (along with a very few other students) simply weren't told about the big prom and they were directed to the country club. About 7 or 8 people showed up for the country club event.

This is probably the wave of the future for these events anyway. Schools can't enforce order at a lot of proms. There's a liability issue around underage drinking and sex. Students aren't particularly interested in prom royalty elections that are meaningless in terms of actual popularity. Fewer parents can afford the absurd expenses of proms today.

I expect we'll see schools dropping these events as time goes on. Communities with an interest will provide private options. Essentially, it will work the way it worked prior to 1920 or so.

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:37 PM
I've never heard of restrictions on who can attend a prom. Unless things have changed a lot, plenty of people just go stag (male and female both). The clothing issue is laughable. Women are supposed to wear vaguely formal dresses (which doesn't mean much) and men wear a tux or a suit or at least real shoes and a tie.

Renting a tux isn't less expensive than buying a dress.

Proms have lost their very pointed heterosexual function as "practice" social events.

It's really rather vulgar when you think about it. You have your "sweet sixteen" at which point you are on the market, then you have your prom where you are supposed to seal the deal, your engagement party where you announce the deal, your marriage, and then your funeral. Quaint.

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:41 PM
Cancel the prom and plan a private formal. Either that or tell the ACLU to go F__ its sself.

That works as long as it isn't a school function and as long as it isn't a prom substitute to which everyone except the lesbian couple is invited. Then it's a work around and a fraud against the court, which is exactly what happened.

I hope to see the principal charged. If the country club wasn't paid for the entire class to attend, if they didn't prepare refreshments sufficient for the entire number of tickets prom attendees, then the principal clearly intended to deceive the court. On the other hand, if he paid the country club as if everyone was going to attend, but knew that they weren't, then he is guilty of malfeasance with the student funds.

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:44 PM
I wasn't aware that the First Amendment covered things such as types of dress or dates...:rolleyes:


Amazing what the Left thinks the Constitution protects....

The Constitution in a general way states that equality is the law of the land. The law is more specific, and forbids discrimination based on sex. Case law supports an actionable offense when a female is punished for wearing arguably male attire. Moreover, sex discrimination would apply whenever a female may not do what a male would be allowed to do except in those very narrow exceptions to the law such as military service and we might reasonably expect that to tumble down any day.

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:46 PM
I can't recall the last time the ACLU was on the right side of an issue.. They seem to side with the immoral with every opportunity...

The ACLU is almost always on the right side of the issues. We tend to object only when it steps on our own prejudices and privileges.

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:49 PM
Very true. They're all about the sex now.

I remember my prom as being about going out to dinner and a dance. Most of my class didn't attend the prom, it was considered kind of dated.

Gingersnap
04-08-2010, 12:53 PM
It's really rather vulgar when you think about it. You have your "sweet sixteen" at which point you are on the market, then you have your prom where you are supposed to seal the deal, your engagement party where you announce the deal, your marriage, and then your funeral. Quaint.

Uh, if you say so. My community doesn't really work that way. Nobody has 'sweet 16' functions. Nobody expects to trap a potential spouse into being engaged-to-be-engaged by high school graduation.

People do celebrate engagements and marriages, of course, but these are private functions. Secular funerals are private, religious funerals are for the congregation and invited members of the public.

M21
04-08-2010, 12:54 PM
Where do you think you came from, I'm thinking back seat of an AMC Pacer or something similar!Ouch! That's just mean. :)

Novaheart
04-08-2010, 12:55 PM
I think she's talking about the actual execution of the prom. Students (and presumably parents) found a venue for the prom and got it all organized outside the school. There was another community prom held at a country club. The lesbian (along with a very few other students) simply weren't told about the big prom and they were directed to the country club. About 7 or 8 people showed up for the country club event.

This is probably the wave of the future for these events anyway. Schools can't enforce order at a lot of proms. There's a liability issue around underage drinking and sex. Students aren't particularly interested in prom royalty elections that are meaningless in terms of actual popularity. Fewer parents can afford the absurd expenses of proms today.

I expect we'll see schools dropping these events as time goes on. Communities with an interest will provide private options. Essentially, it will work the way it worked prior to 1920 or so.

I agree with you that prom is probably going to cease to be a school sponsored or regulated function but not because of gay people. Schools either have to ban all nonstudents from the prom , or permit attendees to have dates who do not go to the school. That opens the door for all sorts of problems. Either way you end up with a prom that people don't want to go to.

PoliCon
04-08-2010, 02:06 PM
The ACLU is almost always on the LEFT side of the issues. We tend to object only when it steps on our own prejudices and privileges.

Fixored it for you.

PoliCon
04-08-2010, 02:08 PM
I agree with you that prom is probably going to cease to be a school sponsored or regulated function but not because of gay people. Schools either have to ban all nonstudents from the prom , or permit attendees to have dates who do not go to the school. That opens the door for all sorts of problems. Either way you end up with a prom that people don't want to go to.

You're missing the point. The issue was as much about dress code as anything else.

Rockntractor
05-20-2010, 02:09 AM
Yep, sure is..

there is some paper work that has to be filled out in the office though
have fun at prom =)

I miss the good old days when spam was lunch meat.

PoliCon
05-20-2010, 02:10 AM
Yep, sure is..

there is some paper work that has to be filled out in the office though
have fun at prom =)

and how do you like your spam?:rolleyes:

Rebel Yell
05-20-2010, 09:06 AM
If a kid decided to go to Prom in ripped up jeans and a stained T Shirt, is that OK? IT"S CALLED A DRESS CODE!!!!!! Deal with it.

PoliCon
05-20-2010, 10:23 AM
It's funny how the same people who don't want dress codes want speech codes . . . . .