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Gingersnap
03-17-2010, 10:17 AM
Study shows gaming can hinder reading, writing progress
Parents of young boys, take note

By Tony Smith Get more from this author

17th March 2010 10:30 GMT

A study has confirmed what any savvy parent could have told you: young boys who are given games consoles may fail to advance as far academically as their Wii, Xbox and PlayStation-less peers.

A team from the Denison University in Ohio led by psychologists Robert Weis and Brittany Cerankosky gave PlayStation 2s to 32 boys out of a group of 64 lads aged between six and nine years old. None of the kids had a console already.

Half of the children given a console got it at the start of the study, the rest at the end. The test ran for four months. During that time, parents kept a record of their kids' activities from the end of the school day until bedtime.

Reading and writing skills were assessed throughout the group at the start and at the end of the study period.

The researchers didn't monitor what the boys were doing with their consoles, only how much time they spent playing on them.

The results were clear - you'll undoubtedly have guessed them already. Kids with consoles spent less time doing other things, from homework to reading to less tangible academic activities such as discussing their school day with parents. That manifested itself in slower progress in the development of reading and writing, as evidenced by "significantly lower reading and writing scores" in the second, final set of tests.

However, they did not show any untoward behavioural issues after taking possession of their PlayStations.

All this comes as no surprise, perhaps, but the study does nail down the answer to questions of whether modern kids can cope with cramming more activities into the day: they can't. Gaming, in this case, displaced other activities - it wasn't shoehorned in.

Reg Hardware (http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2010/03/17/gaming_research_academic_success/)

PoliCon
03-17-2010, 10:24 AM
It also teaches them to confuse adrenalin rushes with happiness. My B-in-Law is a prime example. He's not content unless he is chasing his next thrill. :(

djones520
03-17-2010, 11:59 PM
It also teaches them to confuse adrenalin rushes with happiness. My B-in-Law is a prime example. He's not content unless he is chasing his next thrill. :(

I've been playing video games my whole life. I don't think I've ever gotten an adrenaline rush from one. Well, not quite true. A few rare occasions in PVP situations on certain games, it's almost like an extremely fast paced chess match. That gets the heart pumping a bit. But that is so rare, it's negligible. I think you might be barking up the wrong tree on this one.

Sonnabend
03-19-2010, 07:32 AM
My B-in-Law is a prime example. He's not content unless he is chasing his next thrill. :(

I'm a hardcore gamer, and this is a load of codswallop. I get my rush from work and the challenges in everyday life. The average gamer is in mid-20's to 30's, employed, family.

Sorry, not buying this claptrap for one moment.

PoliCon
03-19-2010, 10:21 AM
I'm a hardcore gamer, and this is a load of codswallop. I get my rush from work and the challenges in everyday life. The average gamer is in mid-20's to 30's, employed, family.

Sorry, not buying this claptrap for one moment.

Then perhaps you are a different personality type.

Gingersnap
03-19-2010, 10:45 AM
There no question that video games degrade reading and writing skills in boys. The less you read for pleasure as a child or teen, the more difficult accessing the printed word becomes. It's one thing for adults with full academic skills to use time playing 'Call of Duty', it's something else for boys who are already behind girls in literacy.

Sonnabend
03-19-2010, 05:17 PM
Then that is an issue for a/ the parents and b/ the schools.

If the parents are too lax, too liberal and too stupid to monitor their kids game time, if the schools cant teach the basics, then it is nothing to do with games, and everything to do with the parents failure to properly raise their kids.

One is not the other.

Megaguns91
03-19-2010, 05:41 PM
I'm with Sonna on this one. Love video games in moderation. I also ready 5 books at a time. Meh. All in the eye of the beholder perhaps. My brother's the same way. Loves video games. Loves books.

PoliCon
03-19-2010, 07:22 PM
Then that is an issue for a/ the parents and b/ the schools.

If the parents are too lax, too liberal and too stupid to monitor their kids game time, if the schools cant teach the basics, then it is nothing to do with games, and everything to do with the parents failure to properly raise their kids.

One is not the other.

Reading requires practice. And if you don't practice, you don't improve. For this reason, reading is given as homework - homework that most inner city kids do not do because they'd rather play games or watch TV, because mom - and in rare cases dad don't make them do it - often because mom and dad are functionally illiterate themselves. Furthermore, when you're dealing with kids like this they have such atrocious behavioral skills that elementary teachers spend more time dealing with behavior than they do in actually teaching sad to say. Complicate that with special interest government mandated crap that they have to indoctrinate the kids with - is it any wonder that they fail?