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View Full Version : "How to Legally Refuse to Participate in the Census Survey"



megimoo
03-17-2010, 06:59 PM
"Things have really changer in my America.I cannot recall ever refusing to take part in any national census but today it seems to be the norm.The majority of This American people have grown to distrust and hate their government in one very short year following this latest election.":mad:

Hayden’s Note

I know this is a lengthy post, but it is incredibly educational. If nothing else, please scroll down towards the bottom and read the last several paragraphs that detail my plan of attack [To all IRS/DHS listening, that means "non-violent response"] when my Census Form arrives. Print it out and use it as a template for yourself!

I recently heard someone say the time has come for some civil disobedience and the intrusive nature of the Census makes it the perfect place to start. I could not agree more. The American people need to draw a line in the sand and tell the reprobates in the federal government we will no longer tolerate their usurpations of power.

If the American people are going make a stand and go toe to toe with the federal government, then they need a basic understanding of some constitutional principles because these principles are universal and pertain to every power exercised by the federal government.

Constitutional Principles

Principle No. 1. The Constitution established a separation of power between the States and their federal government. James Madison explained this principle in Federalist Essay No. 45:.

snip

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The Coup de Gras to their Unconstitutional Information Requests

Even though I do not like to cite court cases, I will attach this one to my letter or hold it in reserve to support my refusal to comply with their bogus requests because it usually ends the discussion and any threat of a fine.

“Neither branch of the legislative department [House of Representatives or Senate], still less any merely administrative body [insert Census Bureau], established by congress, possesses, or can be invested with, a general power of making inquiry into the private affairs of the citizen. Kilbourn v. Thompson, 103 U.S. 168, 190. We said in Boyd v. U.S., 116 U. S. 616, 630, 6 Sup. Ct. 524,―and it cannot be too often repeated,―that the principles that embody the essence of constitutional liberty and security forbid all invasions on the part of government and it’s employees of the sanctity of a man’s home and the privacies of his life. As said by Mr. Justice Field in Re Pacific Ry. Commission, 32 Fed. 241, 250, ‘of all the rights of the citizen, few are of greater importance or more essential to his peace and happiness than the right of personal security, and that involves, not merely protection of his person from assault, but exemption of his private affairs, books, and papers from inspection and scrutiny of others. Without the enjoyment of this right, all others would lose half their value.’” [The bracketed words added for clarification]

Interstate Commerce Commission v. Brimson, 154 U.S. 447, 479 (May 26, 1894)

Note: This United States Supreme Court case has never been overturned.

If the federal government had been granted the general power to make inquires into the private affairs of the American people through the Census or a congressional mandated survey, then the Supreme Court could not have made this statement.

Now that we know the federal government was not granted the constitutional authority to make general inquires into our private affairs under the umbrella of the Census or a survey, I hope the American people will consider engaging in some civil disobedience and refuse to comply with these unconstitutional requests

http://www.truthistreason.net/how-to-legally-refuse-to-participate-in-the-census-survey

linda22003
03-18-2010, 07:33 AM
Fine, sit it out if you want your state to be under-represented and under-funded. Doesn't bother me.