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Gingersnap
03-22-2010, 10:28 AM
No more denim; no more SpongeBob scrubs

U. Hospitals and Clinics goes for professionalism with employee dress code

By Elaine Jarvik

Deseret News

Published: Thursday, March 18, 2010 10:28 p.m. MDT

SALT LAKE CITY No denim skirts. No faded corduroy pants. No sequined tops, no baggy tops, no hoop earrings larger than 1.5 inches in diameter. No frosted eye shadow.

When the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics adopted a new dress code for its 7,000 employees this year, it opted for conservative and very specific. The policy will be fully in effect by July.

The idea, says CEO David Entwistle, is to provide an environment in which patients feel confident that they're in capable hands.

"It's a reflection that we take our job seriously," says hospital spokesman Chris Nelson. "It's hard to keep that faith in your care provider if the nurse is wearing SpongeBob SquarePants scrubs." Also considered "not professional": hoodies, fleece vests, flannel, sandals, more than two rings per hand, pleats that don't lay flat.

On the list of acceptable dress: conservative, classic, modest, tailored cardigan sweater sets.

The specifics of the new policy, which took two years to hammer out, came from a team of employees, not from hospital administrators, says Nelson. But the need for specificity was requested by managers who felt the old policy was vague and inconsistently enforced.

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"I would sometimes see folks with ripped, holey clothing that might be stylish in a different setting, or they'd be at a counter, showing cleavage," says Julie Schmidt, a registered nurse who is manager of the emergency department and who served on the dress code committee. "Or people who like to wear their slippers or flip-flops.' "

So now all nurses will wear white, with red, navy or black bottoms. Pharmacists in the emergency department will wear olive. EMTs and certified nurse assistants will wear red, black or navy, and there will be a color-coded chart in each patient's room to keep score.

The new policy does not apply to the U.'s physicians or medical students.

"Sloppy appearance equals sloppy work that's what we internalize," says Roberta Hughes, president of Avidere, an image consulting company hired by the U. hospitals and clinics. In the health care industry in general, "we've been seeing an overall decline in presentation," Hughes says. "Sometimes patients can't tell the difference between a person on the street and an employee."

Patients also had complained that they sometimes couldn't tell who was who among the parade of people in scrubs.

"Patients would be lying in a hospital bed and would see someone in scrubs and they'd say 'Can you tell me about my test results,' and the employee would say 'I'm just here to sweep the floor,' " says Schmidt.

Wow! As a potential client for medical stuff, I wish they would all do something like this! I've actually been in the position of trying to get information from somebody I thought was a nurse but who turned out to be a janitor.

Also, I really don't need to see some ginormous ta-tas when I'm filling out paperwork at a hospital. All those clipboard women seem to have huge bosoms that they display way too much.

My work has a conservative dress code. Somehow, people still seem to make jokes, be creative, and relax on their breaks without wearing scary or revealing clothing.

Deseret News (http://www.deseretnews.com/article/700017737/No-more-denim-no-more-SpongeBob-scrubs.html)

fettpett
03-22-2010, 10:34 AM
good, about time...though I have no issues seeing a nice pair of ta ta's as you put it :D it does distract from what is going on

PoliCon
03-22-2010, 11:33 AM
ummmmm. . . . ta ta's . . . .
http://www.papblog.com.ar/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/lordofthefiles_homer-drool.gif
:D

Seriously though - profesionalism and a professional appearance are plus's's's's's (take that linda!!) in my book.

noonwitch
03-23-2010, 11:18 AM
I always thought that the cutsie scrubs with things like spongebob printed on them were something exclusive to pediatrics-I see them at Children's Hospital, but not at the adult hospitals. I don't think there's anything wrong with people who work in peds wearing that kind of stuff to work.


But I don't want my OB/GYN wearing a Spongebob jacket while she's performing her routine exam on me. That would be a little disconcerting.

Speedy
03-23-2010, 12:02 PM
Let's see how strongly they adhere to that dress code when someone shows up wearing a hajib. Islam trumps everything, you know.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-24-2010, 01:42 AM
Let's see how strongly they adhere to that dress code when someone shows up wearing a hajib. Islam trumps everything, you know.

You should live in a Muslim majority area, your fascination with Islam might end.

Speedy
03-24-2010, 09:35 AM
You should live in a Muslim majority area, your fascination with Islam might end.

Maybe Muslims should learn that they live in a Christian/Jewish majority country and stop bitching. There are a lot of other countries following their silly culture where they would feel more comfortable. Maybe they should check them out.

Why are Muslims so insistent on their culture being given allowances?

CaughtintheMiddle1990
03-24-2010, 11:36 AM
Let's see how strongly they adhere to that dress code when someone shows up wearing a hajib. Islam trumps everything, you know.


Maybe Muslims should learn that they live in a Christian/Jewish majority country and stop bitching. There are a lot of other countries following their silly culture where they would feel more comfortable. Maybe they should check them out.

Why are Muslims so insistent on their culture being given allowances?

I know plenty of Muslims who don't ''bitch'' and just live their lives like regular people. Many of them dress differently, but they don't attempt to impose their standard of dress on me or an other non-Muslim in the neighborhood. I'd say most of the Muslims herein my area are pretty peaceful actually, even when Hasidic Jews venture into the Muslim parts of the neighborhood, there has never been any religious tension or violence; the're also very social with non-Muslims. Most of the people I grew up with were either Muslims or Arabic or half Arabic, and they never treated me with anything than less than respect and friendship.

noonwitch
03-24-2010, 12:51 PM
I know plenty of Muslims who don't ''bitch'' and just live their lives like regular people. Many of them dress differently, but they don't attempt to impose their standard of dress on me or an other non-Muslim in the neighborhood. I'd say most of the Muslims herein my area are pretty peaceful actually, even when Hasidic Jews venture into the Muslim parts of the neighborhood, there has never been any religious tension or violence; the're also very social with non-Muslims. Most of the people I grew up with were either Muslims or Arabic or half Arabic, and they never treated me with anything than less than respect and friendship.



In Oak Park, MI, Hasidic Jews and Arab Muslims live as neighbors, have businesses and restaurants in the same strip malls, and generally get along. They're all americans, here. I'm always treated respectfully in arab-owned businesses. If I go to one of my regular stops for middle eastern food, I get extras sometimes because I'm a regular customer, like occasionally, I'll find some baklava I didn't order in the bag.

Speedy
03-24-2010, 04:23 PM
I know plenty of Muslims who don't ''bitch'' and just live their lives like regular people. Many of them dress differently, but they don't attempt to impose their standard of dress on me or an other non-Muslim in the neighborhood. I'd say most of the Muslims herein my area are pretty peaceful actually, even when Hasidic Jews venture into the Muslim parts of the neighborhood, there has never been any religious tension or violence; the're also very social with non-Muslims. Most of the people I grew up with were either Muslims or Arabic or half Arabic, and they never treated me with anything than less than respect and friendship.


Those are fine, I have no problem with them. But I have also worked where the Muslims expected me to not eat within site of them when they fasted for Ramadan. Hey, fuck you. I eat when I am hungry, Bitch.

I have also worked where one washed his feet in the sink at prayer time. What the fuck is that?

lurkalot
03-24-2010, 06:07 PM
Back to the original topic. This has been discussed amongst my management team numerous times. We are all "old school" medical staff and we do feel that a certain amount of professionalism has been lost when crisp whites and even those horrible nurse's hats were taken away. We who were "pinned" and worked very hard to EARN the right to wear those whites and that ugly hat were proud to show off our skills and professionalism.
On the other hand, I work at a care center, which means that I go into the resident's home. It certainly wouldn't look very much like a home with a bunch of labcoats, nurses uniforms and hats running around, so we are a bit more casual.

But what is it with the clipboard cleavage? :confused:

Bubba Dawg
03-24-2010, 06:37 PM
I like to dress up as Sponge Bob No Pants......:)

lurkalot
03-24-2010, 07:58 PM
I like to dress up as Sponge Bob No Pants......:)

please, not right after supper ok? :eek: or before supper..in fact, please..never again ever put that visual image in my brain...

PoliCon
03-25-2010, 06:45 AM
please, not right after supper ok? :eek: or before supper..in fact, please..never again ever put that visual image in my brain...

Damn! Bubba got Lurkie!:eek: