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View Full Version : Behold the arrival of boneless chicken wings



bijou
03-24-2010, 12:48 PM
Once a novel way to use a throwaway part and sell more beer the humble Buffalo chicken wing is now a whole industry. But the wing pieces are no longer cheap: Wholesale prices doubled in the past decade. And that's creating real problems for restaurants. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that chicken wings were wholesaling at 68 cents a pound at the turn of the millennium. But by last year, that price had more than doubled, to $1.47 a pound.

And when you go through literally a ton a day, like the Anchor Bar does, that can really add up.

Richard Lobb, spokesperson for the National Chicken Council, based in Washington, D.C., says that as the popularity of wings has risen, producers have scrambled to keep pace with demand.

But while the fortunes of wings are rising, the reverse is happening for mild-tasting, low-fat chicken breasts. Prices have slumped for breasts, which used to be the most lucrative part of the bird.

"As pricey as chicken wings have been getting until quite recently, they are not enough to carry the bird, so to speak," Lobb said.

So once you've sold the wings, how do you move the rest of the bird? You make perhaps the first innovation in chicken wings since Teressa Belissimo fried up the initial batch. You give something more or less healthy the full Buffalo wing treatment.

"I think what you're seeing in the United States is the trend toward boneless wings," Lobb said, "which are actually pieces of breast meat that are breaded and battered and cooked in the same way as the wings, and served with the same sauce. So this appeals to people who don't like bones in their food, or something of that nature." ...

link (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124630769)

Cheers for non rigid foodstuffs. :D

noonwitch
03-24-2010, 12:56 PM
My chief complaint about Buffalo wings, wing-dings, or whatever you want to call them, is that they are all bone and sauce, and have very little meat on them.

Megaguns91
03-24-2010, 01:01 PM
My chief complaint about Buffalo wings, wing-dings, or whatever you want to call them, is that they are all bone and sauce, and have very little meat on them.

I loove buffalo wings.

Gingersnap
03-24-2010, 01:15 PM
I don't care Buffalo wings. Mr. Snaps loves them and tries to force me to make them occasionally. Deep frying a coated chicken part just for the purpose of dunking it some kind of sauce seems insane to me. Why bother to deep fry it in the first place? :confused:

Instead, I marinate the wings in teryiaki garlic sauce overnight and then bake them with a honey glaze. Same chicken part but less than half the bother.

noonwitch
03-24-2010, 01:22 PM
I don't care Buffalo wings. Mr. Snaps loves them and tries to force me to make them occasionally. Deep frying a coated chicken part just for the purpose of dunking it some kind of sauce seems insane to me. Why bother to deep fry it in the first place? :confused:

Instead, I marinate the wings in teryiaki garlic sauce overnight and then bake them with a honey glaze. Same chicken part but less than half the bother.




Mmm, that sounds good. I'm going to have to try it, but I'll do it with thighs, as that's the part of the chicken I think tastes best. It sounds a lot healthier than deep-fried.

Gingersnap
03-24-2010, 01:58 PM
Mmm, that sounds good. I'm going to have to try it, but I'll do it with thighs, as that's the part of the chicken I think tastes best. It sounds a lot healthier than deep-fried.

I've used thighs, drumsticks or entire leg quarters. Just dump the teriyaki, diced garlic, and grated ginger (optional) into a ziplock bag along with the chicken. Flip the bag a few times when you think of it.

Preheat your oven to around 375 F and put your chicken on a rack in a high-sided pan and pop it in the oven. Meanwhile, dump about a third of a cup of honey and a little more teriyaki sauce into a measuring cup and microwave for a minute or so. Baste the chicken a few times with the honey mixture (don't forget to turn the chicken pieces over) and cook between 45 minutes and hour (depending on the thickness of the pieces).

Watch it at the end so the honey doesn't scorch (it will still taste fine if that happens a little).

This tastes great with pilaf or tabouli and it tastes just as good hot or cold for lunch the next day. I have no idea of the calories involved but I'm sure it's a lot less than in Buffalo wings.

PoliCon
03-24-2010, 02:48 PM
I like wings as long as they're crispy.

aerojarod
03-24-2010, 03:03 PM
I like wings as long as they're crispy.

You speak the truth.

A mouthful of slimy fatty chicken fat really puts me off.

marv
03-24-2010, 04:44 PM
Cut the flappers off if still attached. Bread the wings in whatever mix you like, and stick them in the fridge for half an hour or so. Deep fry, cool, and freeze for whatever future intention you have in mind. I do it in bulk.

Ahhh, the magic of quick finger food!

SarasotaRepub
03-24-2010, 07:15 PM
Tyson is GOD with chicken parts!!!! :D

patriot45
03-24-2010, 07:30 PM
I like wings as long as they're crispy.

Then the grill is the way to go! I have made hellfire wings on the grill!! I don't deep fry. I have baked hot wings before but you have to broil them for the last 10 minutes to crisp them up.

Rockntractor
03-24-2010, 08:25 PM
Tyson is GOD with chicken parts!!!! :D

Amen brother, testify! Hallelujah, praise the chicken wing.:D

PoliCon
03-25-2010, 06:44 AM
Then the grill is the way to go! I have made hellfire wings on the grill!! I don't deep fry. I have baked hot wings before but you have to broil them for the last 10 minutes to crisp them up.

Broil, bake, fry, grill - How you prepare them doesn't matter to me. If the skin isn't crisp - I'm not interested.