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View Full Version : Taking a Mound of Salt for What Ails You



bijou
05-11-2010, 01:15 PM
Sink into a chair, relax and breathe in the salt air. You aren't at the beach, but rather in one of a growing number of indoor salt rooms whose owners say small salt particles can soothe respiratory and skin conditions. Scientific evidence in English-language publications is scant and some doctors urge caution for asthmatics.

Across the U.S., salt rooms have been popping up in cities such as New York, Orlando, Naples, Fla., Boulder, Colo., Chicago and Los Angeles.

While most of us associate salt air with the beach, from a medical standpoint, the experience is designed to mimic salt caves, which have long been considered therapeutic in Eastern Europe. Salt room owners say salt can help skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema and a range of respiratory ailments, including colds, asthma, allergies and bronchitis.

Sometimes called halotherapy chambers, the rooms are designed to provide a relaxing and unusual experience. The walls and ceilings are salt-coated, and grains are often scattered a few inches deep on the floor. Children are often allowed to play in it, as in a sandbox. Some places have cave-like decor, complete with salt-coated stalactites.
Healing Salt

Indoor salt rooms have been popping up in cities across the U.S. as marketers tout salty air as a remedy for allergies, asthma, colds and even skin problems.


Some facilities just pile up salt in the room, while others use special "salt generators," machines that grind the salt into very tiny breathable particles and blow it into the air. Orlando's Salt Room uses a generator sold by Indium Top LLC of Tallinn, Estonia. Halo Air LLC of New York, which recently opened a Halo/Air salt room in Manhattan, uses a generator from Halomed UAB, of Vilnius, Lithuania. Halo Air hopes to open dozens more locations in the U.S. ... link (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703880304575236282972152968.html?m od=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_5)

For hippies with more money than sense. :D

fettpett
05-11-2010, 01:22 PM
oy.... *shakes head* idiots in both allopathic and holistic health care

lacarnut
05-11-2010, 01:24 PM
I am going to the beach next Monday so I will be getting plenty of salt air. :)

noonwitch
05-11-2010, 02:18 PM
Before modern refrigeration and chemical food preservatives, wasn't salt used also as a preservative, especially for meat?


I could see that perhaps it has an ability to stop or slow the spread of infections and bacteria.

Gingersnap
05-11-2010, 03:40 PM
Before modern refrigeration and chemical food preservatives, wasn't salt used also as a preservative, especially for meat?


I could see that perhaps it has an ability to stop or slow the spread of infections and bacteria.

It could possibly have that effect if the salt was actually touching the infected flesh. Salt is hygroscopic so it will adversely affect cell membranes in bacteria. It's kind of rough on your own cell membranes which is why salt hurts so damn much when you get some in a paper cut.

You could make a case for using boiled, salted water to clean wounds (in the absence of 21st. Century medical technology).

It's difficult to see what positive effect you'd get from simply breathing air in a room filled with salt. If the salt was pulverized enough to breath into your lungs, I would think that it would also irritate your lungs a lot. People have been using salt as an exfoliant for thousands of years, though. I have no idea if that's superior to any other exfoliant techniques.

noonwitch
05-11-2010, 03:53 PM
It could possibly have that effect if the salt was actually touching the infected flesh. Salt is hygroscopic so it will adversely affect cell membranes in bacteria. It's kind of rough on your own cell membranes which is why salt hurts so damn much when you get some in a paper cut.

You could make a case for using boiled, salted water to clean wounds (in the absence of 21st. Century medical technology).

It's difficult to see what positive effect you'd get from simply breathing air in a room filled with salt. If the salt was pulverized enough to breath into your lungs, I would think that it would also irritate your lungs a lot. People have been using salt as an exfoliant for thousands of years, though. I have no idea if that's superior to any other exfoliant techniques.




The Aveda salons offer a sea salt exfoliant treatment, for about $150. I've never had anything more than haircuts at salons (and, these days I go to Great Clips), other than a facial once that was a birthday gift.

bijou
05-11-2010, 04:01 PM
The Aveda salons offer a sea salt exfoliant treatment, for about $150. I've never had anything more than haircuts at salons (and, these days I go to Great Clips), other than a facial once that was a birthday gift.

Save your cash and use real sea salt, it will be cheaper. any gritty substance combined with a cream or liquid soap will have the same effect.

Gingersnap
05-11-2010, 04:28 PM
Salt Bath: Get naked. Rub yourself almost all over with ordinary salt until your skin gets a little pink. Rinse off with barely warm water. Towel dry.

I've done this dozens of times (my family favors naturopathy). It feels great! Also, the entire thing costs about 97 cents. :p

Rockntractor
05-11-2010, 04:46 PM
Salt Bath: Get naked. Rub yourself almost all over with ordinary salt until your skin gets a little pink. Rinse off with barely warm water. Towel dry.

I've done this dozens of times (my family favors naturopathy). It feels great! Also, the entire thing costs about 97 cents. :p

It sounds like a recipe for salt pork!:eek:

Gingersnap
05-11-2010, 04:59 PM
It sounds like a recipe for salt pork!:eek:

Well, yeah - except for the dead pig, the hanging time, and the rendering part.

CueSi
05-11-2010, 09:16 PM
I use a sea salt/lime/vodka/coconut scrub on my face once a week, it helps exfoliate all the dry skin and leaves it pretty nice and soft. :D

~QC

PoliCon
05-11-2010, 11:19 PM
Before modern refrigeration and chemical food preservatives, wasn't salt used also as a preservative, especially for meat?


I could see that perhaps it has an ability to stop or slow the spread of infections and bacteria.

yes it was. Salt pork was a dietary staple on sea voyages. Salt is natures preservative.

asdf2231
05-12-2010, 10:57 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by noonwitch
Before modern refrigeration and chemical food preservatives, wasn't salt used also as a preservative, especially for meat?


I could see that perhaps it has an ability to stop or slow the spread of infections and bacteria.




yes it was. Salt pork was a dietary staple on sea voyages. Salt is natures preservative.

As was salted beef. They packed the meat into barrels of salt water and before it could be consumed it was soaked in a tank or vat to remove the brine as much as possible. This added a lot to the tonnage in fresh water sailing vessels used to have to carry.

obx
05-12-2010, 02:02 PM
I use a sea salt/lime/vodka/coconut scrub on my face once a week, it helps exfoliate all the dry skin and leaves it pretty nice and soft. :D

~QC

It doesn't work too well on snails.
________
VAPOR (http://vaporizer.org/)

Rockntractor
05-12-2010, 03:20 PM
As was salted beef. They packed the meat into barrels of salt water and before it could be consumed it was soaked in a tank or vat to remove the brine as much as possible. This added a lot to the tonnage in fresh water sailing vessels used to have to carry.
I brine cure meat every fall and winter, I have all my life.

Lager
05-12-2010, 06:57 PM
I use a sea salt/lime/vodka/coconut scrub on my face once a week, it helps exfoliate all the dry skin and leaves it pretty nice and soft. :D

~QC

Wow, that sounds like it would also make a killer tropical cocktail. I think I'd rather squeeze the lime, lick the salt, and down the vodka. :)

malloc
05-12-2010, 07:02 PM
I use a sea salt/lime/vodka/coconut scrub on my face once a week, it helps exfoliate all the dry skin and leaves it pretty nice and soft. :D

~QC

I do something similar to this once a week as well, only it involves tequila and not vodka. Snort the salt, shoot the tequila, then squeeze the lime into your eye. It helps make your face tingle and it makes you 10 feet tall and bullet proof for a couple of hours. Also it will put hair on your chest.

Articulate_Ape
05-12-2010, 08:32 PM
Some people just need a mound of this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbkQTB-OJsk

PoliCon
05-12-2010, 10:34 PM
Some people just need a mound of this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbkQTB-OJsk

YES PLEASE :)

CueSi
05-17-2010, 09:36 AM
Wow, that sounds like it would also make a killer tropical cocktail. I think I'd rather squeeze the lime, lick the salt, and down the vodka. :)

Probably. . . f*ck ... Coconut Rum, Vodka, and lime juice in a salt rimmed glass. I'll tell ya'll how it goes.

~QC