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View Full Version : Is the Current Census Constitutional? The Answer May Surprise You



PoliCon
05-21-2010, 07:53 PM
There are only two reasons given in the US Constitution for what we now call the census: determining the number of representatives needed for a given area, and directing federal taxes. Constitutionally there is but one legitimate question: how many people live in this residence? With the House of Representatives based upon population the first reason is obvious. But the second reason expired when the 16th Amendment to the Constitution introduced the infamous income tax.

Today, three columns of invasive questions across 28 pages are asked in the companion to this year’s census- the American Community Survey. Though the current census has been reduced to ‘just’ 10 questions, the old census ‘long form’ data is now being gathered via the ACS. In their words:

“The ongoing American Community Survey has replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form-type information throughout the decade rather than once every 10 years.”

Washington DC’s violations of your privacy will now be continuous, rather than once per decade. With respect to housing they want to know what kind of building you live in, when it was built, how many rooms, your mortgage, taxes, insurance and utility costs, and move-in date. They also want to know how many automobiles are kept on the premises.

With respect to your personal life, the Feds want to know how many times you were married, the date of your last marriage, and if you have serious difficulty concentrating or bathing. At one point they even asked for the number of stillbirths or abortions you have had. Even your nosiest neighbor does not know these things.

Your job? They wish to know when and where you worked last and how you got there; even how many minutes to get to work is requested. And, of course, you had to disclose your salary, who you work for and what kind of work you do as well as your educational level. President George Bush in 2000 grumbled: “I can understand why people don’t want to give over that information to the government. If I have the long form, I’m not so sure I would do it either.” In China under communism, they had spies gather this information. Today in the Facebook generation, where nothing is sacred or private, many people have willingly given it to the Federal government.

The part I like best are the questions where I am forced to categorize myself by race, but there is no category for someone that doesn’t make distinctions on the basis of race. If given the choice, many would categorize themselves simply as American, and yet in America that is not offered as an option.

The American Community Survey conducting the census publishes a pamphlet called “50 Ways Census Data Are Used”. Only two of the ways this data is used are constitutional. How can DC just collect sensitive personal data without Constitutional authorization? They can’t, without serious distortion. The moment the first census question was asked regarding anything other than ‘how many people live in your home’, the intent of the Constitution was violated.

Should one refuse to answer all unconstitutional questions, the punishment is a fine of up to $5,000. Some time ago they even threatened imprisonment.

The Founding Fathers authorized no other purpose for the head count. If offered a window to our day, they would be appalled at the Federal government’s misuse of this power. They never intended the census to be a national information gathering service, like the one preying on you today.

Dr. Harold Pease is an expert on the United States Constitution. He has dedicated his career to studying the writings of the Founding Fathers and applying that knowledge to current events. He has taught history and political science from this perspective for over 25 years at Taft College. To read more of his articles, please visit www.LibertyUnderFire.org.

http://california.tenthamendmentcenter.com/2010/05/is-the-current-census-constitutional-the-answer-may-surprise-you/

PoliCon
05-21-2010, 08:00 PM
Wife is doing census enumeration. a couple of points:

1 - they count everyone and not just citizens.

2 - they count college students who live on campus in that district.

Both of these bother me in that they both tend to give larger representation in democrat districts. I mean when you have a college town that has 200 actual residents and 20,000 students that stay on campus - the census is counting the population of that district as 20,200. Further more - they do not care that of the 200 residents - 150 are foreign nationals living in the area working for the college. Which means that 50 leftists citizens are being given more weight than are the 19,999 actual citizens that live in the next district over.


ALSO - the census workers have to accept what ever information you give as if it is gospel truth. So if you pad the occupancy of your house by 10 or 20 - they have to accept your answers and cannot dispute them. So if you're in a conservative district - make sure you get your proper representation! :D

Wei Wu Wei
05-22-2010, 07:40 AM
ALSO - the census workers have to accept what ever information you give as if it is gospel truth. So if you pad the occupancy of your house by 10 or 20 - they have to accept your answers and cannot dispute them. So if you're in a conservative district - make sure you get your proper representation! :D

Are you suggesting that people should deliberately lie on their census forms?

Jfor
05-22-2010, 08:41 AM
Are you suggesting that people should deliberately lie on their census forms?

You are a dumbass for even asking that question.

noonwitch
05-24-2010, 02:33 PM
Wife is doing census enumeration. a couple of points:

1 - they count everyone and not just citizens.

2 - they count college students who live on campus in that district.

Both of these bother me in that they both tend to give larger representation in democrat districts. I mean when you have a college town that has 200 actual residents and 20,000 students that stay on campus - the census is counting the population of that district as 20,200. Further more - they do not care that of the 200 residents - 150 are foreign nationals living in the area working for the college. Which means that 50 leftists citizens are being given more weight than are the 19,999 actual citizens that live in the next district over.


ALSO - the census workers have to accept what ever information you give as if it is gospel truth. So if you pad the occupancy of your house by 10 or 20 - they have to accept your answers and cannot dispute them. So if you're in a conservative district - make sure you get your proper representation! :D



The college thing is interesting. I wasn't in school during a census year. I used my parents' address for both voting and car insurance purposes, and would have assumed that they would have reported me in the census, since they claimed me on their taxes.

And I would have been wrong.

PoliCon
05-24-2010, 06:56 PM
The college thing is interesting. I wasn't in school during a census year. I used my parents' address for both voting and car insurance purposes, and would have assumed that they would have reported me in the census, since they claimed me on their taxes.

And I would have been wrong.

Right - so the district that they go to school in get's to count them for representation - but the district they actually vote in - does not. :rolleyes:

noonwitch
05-25-2010, 09:41 AM
Right - so the district that they go to school in get's to count them for representation - but the district they actually vote in - does not. :rolleyes:


That explains a lot about why the public schools in Kalamazoo (a small city, with a university of about 15,000 students and a college that also boosts the population by a few thousand) continue to get good funding, despite the state-wide economic problems that are affecting other school districts. Kalamazoo is not a city of wealthy residents (like Ann Arbor's or East Lansing's non-student populations), and their property taxes are not high.