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Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 11:37 AM
June 14, 2010

Painter Thomas Kinkade arrested for alleged DUI
By Kim Minugh and Hudson Sangree

kminugh@sacbee.com

Famed Placerville-raised painter Thomas Kinkade has been arrested for allegedly driving drunk outside Carmel, according to the California Highway Patrol.

A Monterey County sheriff's deputy initially pulled over Kinkade's Mercedes Benz for a vehicle code violation Friday night, said CHP Officer Robert Lehman. After making contact with the 52-year-old Kinkade, the deputy suspected that he was drunk, Lehman said.

The deputy called the CHP to assist, and an officer performed tests to determine that Kinkade was impaired, Lehman said. The CHP officer arrested Kinkade just after 10 p.m., Lehman said.

Kinkade was booked into the Monterey County Jail on suspicion of misdemeanor drunken driving, Lehman said.

The arresting officer reported that Kinkade was "very polite" during the exchange, Lehman said.

Kinkade did submit to a blood test, Lehman said; however, the CHP is not releasing his blood-alcohol level.

Kinkade, dubbed the "Painter of Light," is the most-collected artist of modern times and likely the best-selling in history. Millions of his paintings are displayed in homes across the nation.

I have one of his daily calendars on my desk. :(

Read more: http://blogs.sacbee.com/crime/archives/2010/06/painter-thomas.html#ixzz0qw7WrpoD

linda22003
06-15-2010, 11:47 AM
I'm not shocked by the story, Ginger. I AM shocked by your comment.

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 11:50 AM
I'm not shocked by the story, Ginger. I AM shocked by your comment.

Dare to be provincial - that's my motto. :p

linda22003
06-15-2010, 12:04 PM
"Provincial". Is that how we're referring to kitsch, now? :D

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 12:31 PM
"Provincial". Is that how we're referring to kitsch, now? :D

Today's kitsch is tomorrow's Smithsonian exhibition. :D

Articulate_Ape
06-15-2010, 12:32 PM
I wonder if he was pulled over on a country lane leading to a small stone cottage near a bubbling brook bathed in the soft halo of twilight.

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 12:34 PM
I wonder if he was pulled over on a country lane leading to a small stone cottage near a bubbling brook bathed in the soft halo of twilight.

Only if the cottage was also displaying an American flag. It was Flag Day, after all.

PoliCon
06-15-2010, 12:52 PM
"Provincial". Is that how we're referring to kitsch, now? :D


kitsch [Ger.,=trash], term most frequently applied since the early 20th cent. to works considered pretentious and tasteless. Exploitative commercial objects such as Mona Lisa scarves and abominable plaster reproductions of sculptural masterpieces are described as kitsch, as are works that claim artistic value but are weak, cheap, or sentimental. A museum of kitsch was opened in Stuttgart.

THE PERFECT term for Kinkade's work. :D Bonus points to Linda#'s

SaintLouieWoman
06-15-2010, 01:05 PM
"Provincial". Is that how we're referring to kitsch, now? :D

You've nailed it exactly. I never liked his stuff, but then I'm sitting in a house with disgusting highly saturated yellow walls in the foyer, living room, dining room, family room, kitchen and laundry room. When you step into the little hall of the family room, we add another shade of light yellow, then go into the hall bath and it's the only decent room in the house, a tan color. Then the bedroom on one side of the little hall is a flax color, the other this disgusting sherbet green color.

There are some parts of the country where you can stand and see X number of surrounding states. Here you can stand in the small hall and see 5 colors. The previous owner was nuts.

Then there's the sort of greenish blue turquoise master bedroom and bath.

So how do I have the right to diss Kinkade's stuff? I bought this kalidescope of a house and we'll have to pay to get a painter in here to correct this stuff. I just don't have the energy yet.

linda22003
06-15-2010, 01:11 PM
Today's kitsch is tomorrow's Smithsonian exhibition. :D

I went to a really fun exhibition at the National Gallery several years ago; it was specifically on "kitschy" art, paintings which were never "high art" but which have become iconic over time, like this one:

http://joelmp98.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/washington-crossing-the-delaware.jpg

and its British equivalent in terms of fame:

http://www.avictorian.com/art/Winterhalter_Franz_Xavier_The%20First%20of%20May%2 0The%20Duke%20of%20Wellington%20Presenting%20a%20C asket%20on%20Prince%20Arthur%20Birthday1851.jpg

Rebel Yell
06-15-2010, 01:16 PM
You've nailed it exactly. I never liked his stuff, but then I'm sitting in a house with disgusting highly saturated yellow walls in the foyer, living room, dining room, family room, kitchen and laundry room. When you step into the little hall of the family room, we add another shade of light yellow, then go into the hall bath and it's the only decent room in the house, a tan color. Then the bedroom on one side of the little hall is a flax color, the other this disgusting sherbet green color.

There are some parts of the country where you can stand and see X number of surrounding states. Here you can stand in the small hall and see 5 colors. The previous owner was nuts.

Then there's the sort of greenish blue turquoise master bedroom and bath.

So how do I have the right to diss Kinkade's stuff? I bought this kalidescope of a house and we'll have to pay to get a painter in here to correct this stuff. I just don't have the energy yet.

Odds are, the previous owner was a transplant as well.

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 01:33 PM
I went to a really fun exhibition at the National Gallery several years ago; it was specifically on "kitschy" art, paintings which were never "high art" but which have become iconic over time, like this one:

http://joelmp98.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/washington-crossing-the-delaware.jpg

and its British equivalent in terms of fame:

http://www.avictorian.com/art/Winterhalter_Franz_Xavier_The%20First%20of%20May%2 0The%20Duke%20of%20Wellington%20Presenting%20a%20C asket%20on%20Prince%20Arthur%20Birthday1851.jpg

I have a small collection of Victorian prints featuring sentimental images of dogs. I like them much, much better than I do anything of Gauguin's. Probably because I have experience with dogs and none at all with semi-naked island women.

I took my share of art history in college and I can analyze art in terms technique, period, and school (at least as well as any educated person can). In the end though, art is about its effect on the viewer. A pleasing but trite composition that brings a smile is superior to critically acclaimed work of such arch subjectivity that it shuts the viewer out.

I don't have any problem with Kincaid's work. I'm not getting in a car with him any time soon, though. :p

Articulate_Ape
06-15-2010, 01:37 PM
I have a small collection of Victorian prints featuring sentimental images of dogs.

Are they playing poker or pool?

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 01:41 PM
Are they playing poker or pool?

That's not Victorian but I do own one of the poker dogs images in cheap tablecloth form.

And I like it fine. :D

linda22003
06-15-2010, 01:47 PM
Are they playing poker or pool?

My husband and I were in an antique ("junque") shop one time, and saw a sentimental painting on the wall of a group of puppies playing amidst some spilled cards. My husband said, "Ah, the comparatively rare 'Puppies LEARNING How to Play Poker'". :p

SaintLouieWoman
06-15-2010, 01:49 PM
Odds are, the previous owner was a transplant as well.

They own a summer house in N Carolina. I doubt if they are native Floridians, but they think they need those "Florida" colors.

I actually met a native Floridian, in fact a native of Sarasota, today. He was the guy from the pest management company who came to deliver me from the giant roaches. He was a very nice young man, but then I would have thought Attila the Hun was nice if he killed these damned insects here. :D

linda22003
06-15-2010, 01:52 PM
He was a very nice young man, but then I would have thought Attila the Hun was nice if he killed these damned insects here. :D

Did he stomp on them? Did you hear big crunching and popping sounds? Where is Shannon when we need her?

seehorse
06-15-2010, 01:53 PM
Beautiful paintings!:eek:

SaintLouieWoman
06-15-2010, 02:03 PM
Did he stomp on them? Did you hear big crunching and popping sounds? Where is Shannon when we need her?

No, he sprayed all this green "safe" stuff down the drain to kill any resident bacteria that the bugs enjoy eating. He also had little devices that puffed powder in cracks. He said that it will take a while to destroy the obnoxious things.

Funny, when I was an animal handler at the zoo, I'd handle various snakes, amphibians, possums, etc. The only thing that freaked me out was the "largest cockroaches" in the world that we'd show the kids, the Madagascar hissing cockroaches. I refused to touch them.

The things flitting around here, the palmetto bugs, gave those hissing cockroaches a run for their money. :D

bijou
06-15-2010, 03:28 PM
I have a small collection of Victorian prints featuring sentimental images of dogs. I like them much, much better than I do anything of Gauguin's. Probably because I have experience with dogs and none at all with semi-naked island women.

I took my share of art history in college and I can analyze art in terms technique, period, and school (at least as well as any educated person can). In the end though, art is about its effect on the viewer. A pleasing but trite composition that brings a smile is superior to critically acclaimed work of such arch subjectivity that it shuts the viewer out.

I don't have any problem with Kincaid's work. I'm not getting in a car with him any time soon, though. :p

You reminded me of this article:
...Salvador Dalí made the classic "anti-good armchair" statements when he turned to furniture design in the 1930s. He created a red upholstered sofa based on Mae West's lips for the English collector Edward James (Brighton Museum), and a stool whose back consists of a pair of predatory arms. Dalí insisted that a chair "can be used to sit on, but on condition that one sits on it uncomfortably". Here, the discomfort arises from the sitter's being, as it were, sexually assaulted by the chair and by being forced to think about sado-masochistic sex. A chair also had to express the spirit of the age and cause the "proud, ornamental, intimidating and quantified spectre of a period to spring forth instantly". It was usually vast public buildings such as Gothic cathedrals that were said to express the spirit of their age, but Dalí wanted to bring the unsettling sublimities associated with colossal symbolic structures into the home.... http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/jun/12/horace-walpole-strawberry-surreal-house

I always thought that chairs were for sitting on! :D

Gingersnap
06-15-2010, 03:39 PM
"...proud, ornamental, intimidating and quantified spectre of a period to spring forth instantly..." I briefly had a sister-in-law who fit that description exactly. :eek:

I'm willing to be intimidated by God but I'll be damned if I'll allow artwork, ornaments, or furniture to stalk me in my own home. :mad:


:p