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NJCardFan
06-29-2010, 11:22 PM
Oooh boy:

Calif NAACP to back pot legalization initiative

By MARCUS WOHLSEN (AP) 6 hours ago

SAN FRANCISCO The NAACP's California chapter pledged its support on Tuesday for a marijuana legalization ballot measure, saying current laws are unfairly used to target minorities.

The group highlighted findings it says show the arrest rate among blacks for low-level marijuana crimes far exceed those of whites in the state's largest counties.

"Justice is the quality of being just and fair and these laws have been neither just nor fair," said Alice Huffman, president of the California State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The November ballot measure would let adults possess up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use. Residents could legally grow small marijuana gardens, and individual cities and counties would decide whether to allow marijuana sales.
Link to rest of the story (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hLIBXrT_v3HGZPxjr319lAAG-_UQD9GL5PH00)

Now, I'm not against legalizing weed but to say the laws are unfair to minorities is race baiting bullshit. Here's an idea. Since it's against the law, don't do it. Or is there some biological reason why blacks need to smoke weed?

Gingersnap
06-29-2010, 11:57 PM
Not blacks but Hispanic citizens could actually make this point.

All the pot laws originally were designed to make Pedro and his various relations pull up stakes and go back to Mexico when he overstayed his guest worker visa.

In terms of sheer numbers, whites are obviously more impacted by pot laws than anybody.

lacarnut
06-30-2010, 01:42 AM
Race baiting is what these clowns in the NAACP, Jessie and grease ball Al do to not only stir up the black community but to gain donations.

m00
06-30-2010, 02:07 PM
Not blacks but Hispanic citizens could actually make this point.

All the pot laws originally were designed to make Pedro and his various relations pull up stakes and go back to Mexico when he overstayed his guest worker visa.

In terms of sheer numbers, whites are obviously more impacted by pot laws than anybody.

I think there might be something to this. Pot is pretty common in some areas, like the pacific northwest. Instead of getting home from the factory and drinking a beer, you get off work from the donut bakery come home and smoke a J. I don't have any problem with this, but that's another debate.

My point is that one trick government has in its arsenal is taking something that's illegal but somewhat common, giving it stiff penalties, and then enforcing it selectively. It's not even necessarily race, it's just a matter of a cop saying "I don't like that person" (for whatever reason), "I'm going to request to search him, and when he refuses, use that as probable cause to search him. With the thousands and thousands of laws on the books, maybe I'll find something he's doing illegal."

Wei Wu Wei
06-30-2010, 09:02 PM
Pot Laws and Hispanics
Opium Laws and Asains

The HARSHLY different punishments for equal amounts given to Cocaine users (mostly white) vs Crack Cocaine users (mostly black/poor)

Wei Wu Wei
06-30-2010, 09:04 PM
There are several studies out showing whites get punished less often and with lighter punishments for marijuana offenses.

Pharmacutecal Abuse is rampant amongst middle and upper-middle class whites, is illegal, is far more dangerous than things like weed, yet is hardly enforced by police.

malloc
06-30-2010, 09:13 PM
I have first hand experience with pharmaceutical abuse within some of my extended family. The police will enforce the laws, and the criminals, yes even the whites will go to jail for it. (My brother-in-law and a few others know this quite well). However, the reason why I don't think it's enforced to the extent of other drugs is because it's very hard to detect. Someone basically has to rat you out in order for the police to ever know about it.

An officer stops a guy for a traffic violation. He does something stupid and allows the police to search the car. The only thing the officer finds is a prescription drug bottle with the drivers name and information on it. The officer has no way of knowing if the prescription is legitimate or illegal, and furthermore the officer has no way of validating the prescription or even identifying what is in the bottle. The officer isn't even supposed to ask what they are, what they are for, etc. On top of that if the patient has a valid prescription, prosecution becomes almost impossible, even if the patient faked the pain to get it from the E.R. doc, or is seeing two doctors and paying cash for one or whatever.

I'm no friend of the NAACP, nor any organization that advances one type of person, but on the surface statistics are on their side here. There are more blacks and hispanics serving time for drug related offenses than whites. However, what we don't know is if there are more whites than blacks and hispanics using drugs, or whether the ratio of users by skin color to incarcerated users by skin color is proportional.

Rockntractor
06-30-2010, 09:16 PM
Pot Laws and Hispanics
Opium Laws and Asains

The HARSHLY different punishments for equal amounts given to Cocaine users (mostly white) vs Crack Cocaine users (mostly black/poor)

Don't break laws and you won't be punished dumb ass!:rolleyes:

lacarnut
06-30-2010, 09:38 PM
Pot Laws and Hispanics
Opium Laws and Asains

The HARSHLY different punishments for equal amounts given to Cocaine users (mostly white) vs Crack Cocaine users (mostly black/poor)

If you are dealing, you need to go to jail.

m00
07-01-2010, 02:05 PM
An officer stops a guy for a traffic violation. He does something stupid and allows the police to search the car.

You mean like refusing a voluntary search?

(Before someone whips out internet arguing points, yes this happened to me. I was told by an officer at a routine traffic stop that my refusal of a voluntary search was probable cause for a search.)

Molon Labe
07-01-2010, 02:10 PM
You mean like refusing a voluntary search?

(Before someone whips out internet arguing points, yes this happened to me. I was told by an officer at a routine traffic stop that my refusal of a voluntary search was probable cause for a search.)

He lied then.

m00
07-01-2010, 02:20 PM
He lied then.

Well, it was over 10 years ago. I remember reading several years later that the Courts actually ruled that this shouldn't happen (so obviously it was). But when a guy with a gun and a badge asks to search your car, you say no... and then he TELLS you he's searching your car because you said no... what are you going to do? Physically try and stop him? Argue, after being told to shut up and stand on the curb? I figured my options were to let him search my vehicle or "resist" and then all bets are off. That never goes down well.

During the search (which took a very long time), I was chatting with his much nicer partner who revealed to me that my bumper stickers were the reason. For both being pulled over and searched. I like the Dead, what can I say. :p

Molon Labe
07-01-2010, 02:41 PM
Well, it was over 10 years ago. I remember reading several years later that the Courts actually ruled that this shouldn't happen (so obviously it was). But when a guy with a gun and a badge asks to search your car, you say no... and then he TELLS you he's searching your car because you said no... what are you going to do? Physically try and stop him? Argue, after being told to shut up and stand on the curb? I figured my options were to let him search my vehicle or "resist" and then all bets are off. That never goes down well.

During the search (which took a very long time), I was chatting with his much nicer partner who revealed to me that my bumper stickers were the reason. For both being pulled over and searched. I like the Dead, what can I say. :p

A Dead sticker will do it.

Yeah you don't argue or anything....just state you don't consent and then let em' proceed.

Odysseus
07-01-2010, 05:16 PM
Well, it was over 10 years ago. I remember reading several years later that the Courts actually ruled that this shouldn't happen (so obviously it was). But when a guy with a gun and a badge asks to search your car, you say no... and then he TELLS you he's searching your car because you said no... what are you going to do? Physically try and stop him? Argue, after being told to shut up and stand on the curb? I figured my options were to let him search my vehicle or "resist" and then all bets are off. That never goes down well.

During the search (which took a very long time), I was chatting with his much nicer partner who revealed to me that my bumper stickers were the reason. For both being pulled over and searched. I like the Dead, what can I say. :p

You were pulled over for Driving While Liking the Grateful Dead? That's a new one.

NJCardFan
07-02-2010, 12:44 AM
A Dead sticker will do it.

Yeah you don't argue or anything....just state you don't consent and then let em' proceed.

Then you get their name and badge number and report them to the chief of police. If that doesn't get you anywhere, then you report them to the commissioner/public safety director/or whatever political head of the police department you have.

m00
07-03-2010, 11:33 AM
Then you get their name and badge number and report them to the chief of police. If that doesn't get you anywhere, then you report them to the commissioner/public safety director/or whatever political head of the police department you have.

Isn't that just setting yourself up for more targeted harassment? I should mention, at the time, the county I lived in was ranked in the top 5 in the nation for police brutality.

NJCardFan
07-03-2010, 11:46 AM
Isn't that just setting yourself up for more targeted harassment? I should mention, at the time, the county I lived in was ranked in the top 5 in the nation for police brutality.

No more than it would be setting them up for lawsuits. Believe me. It isn't worth it to them.

m00
07-03-2010, 11:55 AM
No more than it would be setting them up for lawsuits. Believe me. It isn't worth it to them.

Asking for a badge number and reporting it is probably good advice. At the time, I was very young and it honestly didn't occur to me. But quite frankly, asking for a badge number of a cop that's doing something he shouldn't seems like a good way to get in some serious trouble. I've had run-ins with enough belligerent cops to see how things go down (this was a function of where I grew up, so I'm not saying this is representative of LEOs as a whole). But it seemed like claiming that you were "resisting" was a license to use any amount of force the officer wanted. Whether or not you were breaking any laws never seemed to come into play. Normally you just wanted to keep your head down and fly under the radar.