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Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 04:26 PM
Top 9 Mistakes Of Prepping

June 7th, 2010 ·
A damn fine list by mdcreekmore that needs repeating:

1. Following the wrong advice: Many new survivalist become fixated upon the advice given by others. They read the latest preparedness book or blog post and automatically assume the advice given is best them, without considering their individual needs, skill level or location. In order to be self-reliant you need to learn to think for yourself.

2. Not eating what they store: Many new survivalist fill their pantry with unfamiliar foods, thinking they will adapt their diet “when the time comes” this is nonsense. You need to learn how to prepare and use these foods now, so they become a familiar staple.

3. Relying only on their food storage: Many new survivalist think once they have their one year supply of survival foods, that’s the end. Don’t get me wrong, having a deep larder is important, just don’t overlook the possibility of needing to replenish your supplies, and obtaining the skills and resources needed to do that.

4. Not storing enough salt: Many new survivalist fail to store this staple in the quantities needed. Don’t discount the importance of salt. I suggest at least ten pounds of iodized salt per person as a minimum. For baiting game (illegal in most areas), I’ve put away several salt blocks. These can be found at any agricultural feed store and are sold for cattle.

5. Building an arsenal: I see this all the time. Many new survivalist spend thousands on weapons and related gear, yet have only a two-week supply food and no water filter. This is stupid. I love guns and gear as much as the next person – but I know food and water are more important to my survival. Sure; we need weapons to protect what we’ve put away, just don’t neglect the other stuff.

6. Relying on bugging out: I’m not a fan of the “grab a bug out bag and head for the hills survival strategy”. In most cases you’re better off staying where you are. Having a bug out bag is a good idea, just don’t make bugging out your only plan or first priority.

7. To much stuff not enough skill: Many new survivalist believe they can be saved though buying. This fantasy has been promoted by self-serving survival gurus for years to fill their pockets with cash. Sure supplies are useful and some are needed – just don’t become dependent on stuff instead develop your skills.

8. Storing only one type of food: More than a few new survivalist have made this mistake. I can’t remember exactly where I read it, I think it was on another survival blog – but the author suggested his readers store hundreds of pounds of wheat and nothing else. While wheat is the backbone of my food storage, storing only one type of food, no matter how versatile is foolish.

9. Not taking care of pet needs: Many new survivalist fail to consider the needs of their pets. If you have pets you must plan for their needs by laying back the necessary supplies to keep them fed and healthy.

Thoughts?

CFUCS (http://www.commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/2010/06/07/top-9-mistakes-of-prepping/)

Molon Labe
07-16-2010, 04:42 PM
unfortunately it's so complicated to prepare for the unknown that you're going to miss something if it happens. I'm not so sure something else wouldn't come up not listed here in any event.

have food, water, some ammo a couple guns, and a generator. Have some things to trade with etc.

I don't really worry about this as much as I should

Troll
07-16-2010, 09:38 PM
I don't really worry about this as much as I should

Me neither. Well, make that 'I worry about it, but don't really do anything about it.' :(

If hyperinflation hit tomorrow, I only have a few gallons of water and some canned food. I've been thinking about this a lot lately - especially since people always suggest things like circulating your stock. Give me a break, you mean in 3 years, I have to dump 500 gallons of water and find 500 more? :eek:

I wish he'd talk more about what 'skills' need to be developed, but otherwise, great read. I've never been a big fan of the "bug out bag" idea either.

Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 10:06 PM
Me neither. Well, make that 'I worry about it, but don't really do anything about it.' :(

If hyperinflation hit tomorrow, I only have a few gallons of water and some canned food. I've been thinking about this a lot lately - especially since people always suggest things like circulating your stock. Give me a break, you mean in 3 years, I have to dump 500 gallons of water and find 500 more? :eek:

I wish he'd talk more about what 'skills' need to be developed, but otherwise, great read. I've never been a big fan of the "bug out bag" idea either.

I think the skill set is fairly practical: butchering, gardening, securing your own property, successful low-level medical skills, know how to operate a ham radio, simple carpentry skills, - that kind of thing.

It's not very helpful if you can shoot a deer but have no way of drying the meat, making pemmican, or whatever. Stored wheat won't do you any good if you literally can't make bread on an open fire or can't grind it.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:16 PM
The only way you can successfully prep for complete self sustainability is to live for awhile that way, I have several times and do it quite well.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:20 PM
unfortunately it's so complicated to prepare for the unknown that you're going to miss something if it happens. I'm not so sure something else wouldn't come up not listed here in any event.

have food, water, some ammo a couple guns, and a generator. Have some things to trade with etc.

I don't really worry about this as much as I should

A generator, you should have two. what will you do if one breaks? You need a well and both gas and electric pumps and have a way to obtain fuel and run on multi fuel.

Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 10:23 PM
A generator, you should have two. what will you do if one breaks? You need a well and both gas and electric pumps and have a way to obtain fuel and run on multi fuel.

And you need to know how gennys work. If it conks out, you need to understand how to repair it. I've had very tedious but important lessons on this from Mr. Snaps. :(

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:24 PM
I think the skill set is fairly practical: butchering, gardening, securing your own property, successful low-level medical skills, know how to operate a ham radio, simple carpentry skills, - that kind of thing.

It's not very helpful if you can shoot a deer but have no way of drying the meat, making pemmican, or whatever. Stored wheat won't do you any good if you literally can't make bread on an open fire or can't grind it.

Wheat stored for any length of time gets weevils. Wheat that is for consumption should be heated in glass jars to kill all weevil eggs. Also keep some seed wheat to replenish your supply. Hard red Mennonite wheat from Kansas works well.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:26 PM
And you need to know how gennys work. If it conks out, you need to understand how to repair it. I've had very tedious but important lessons on this from Mr. Snaps. :(

An extra 12 volt system for lighting works well because you can replenish batteries from several sources.

Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 10:27 PM
Wheat stored for any length of time gets weevils. Wheat that is for consumption should be heated in glass jars to kill all weevil eggs. Also keep some seed wheat to replenish your supply. Hard red Mennonite wheat from Kansas works well.

You can freeze it to kill bug eggs. A week or so in the freezer and it's all good. If you store it in a bug-proof container it will last.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:30 PM
Thoughts?

CFUCS (http://www.commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/2010/06/07/top-9-mistakes-of-prepping/)

For your pets go to walmart and buy several 20# sacks of rice to make dog food. All year long I pressure cook the bones and fat from deer and different animals I butcher to mix with the rice for dog food. They are happy this week, they are eating lamb bones and fat.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:43 PM
For heating water save an old gas water heater and build a fire box from either concrete blocks or half of a 50 gallon drum. The water heater acts as your chimney, keep a close eye on it and make sure the pop off valve is operational. An old cast iron claw foot bathtub works great outside if you don't have many neighbors close, I dog a hole under one and built a firebox. Line the bottom with flat rocks so you don't burn your ass. I took a bath on many a night under the stars with a wood fired bath tub. My wife called it the bugs bunny bathtub.
For winter you place a heat exchanger from an old air conditioner on your wood stove and circulate the water through it from your bathtub with a small pump and an air hose it, takes about an hour to get a bath hot this way. I heated water for the house with these methods for ten years.

Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 10:57 PM
Something that you will seldom seen mentioned in prepping is how to spend the down time that you will have in a relatively short-term situation - say for a few months.

While the surviving parts will take time, it won't always consume your entire day. If you rely a lot on TV, the Internet, your music or your cell phone, what will you do when that's all gone? Develop the habits of reading actual books, conversing, working on low tech hobbies like knitting or carving, or other pastimes that you enjoy and that you can sustain in an emergency. Work on them now so if something does happen, you and your family won't be at loose ends for enjoyment.

Rockntractor
07-16-2010, 10:59 PM
Something that you will seldom seen mentioned in prepping is how to spend the down time that you will have in a relatively short-term situation - say for a few months.

While the surviving parts will take time, it won't always consume your entire day. If you rely a lot on TV, the Internet, your music or your cell phone, what will you do when that's all gone? Develop the habits of reading actual books, conversing, working on low tech hobbies like knitting or carving, or other pastimes that you enjoy and that you can sustain in an emergency. Work on them now so if something does happen, you and your family won't be at loose ends for enjoyment.
Sex! But don't let your wife catch you.:eek:

Gingersnap
07-16-2010, 11:22 PM
Sex! But don't let your wife catch you.:eek:

Yeah, but do read up on delivering your breech position love child.

Protip: you can't yank them out by the hooves like you can with goats. :p

Tecate
07-17-2010, 05:30 AM
Toilet paper... Don't forget toilet paper.

Also, if a SHTF scenario ever unfolds, they're coming to confiscate your firearms. They already did it after hurricane Katrina, even in the 'high and dry' areas in neighborhoods with million dollar houses. This is what they do the first chance they get.

PoliCon
07-17-2010, 10:33 AM
Toilet paper... Don't forget toilet paper.

Also, if a SHTF scenario ever unfolds, they're coming to confiscate your firearms. They already did it after hurricane Katrina, even in the 'high and dry' areas in neighborhoods with million dollar houses. This is what they do the first chance they get.

which is why it pays to have a couple from granddad that were never registered . . . .

Cobra
07-17-2010, 08:25 PM
We have beans and rice and the water to cook them.

Yes, our animals, 2 dogs, 2 cats, will definately eat, I know the rice, if they are hungry. If not, well, they are animals - my life is above theirs.

I would eat before them, yes, I would eat THEM, if my life depended on it.

lacarnut
07-17-2010, 10:57 PM
I am heading Rock and Gingers way if the shit hits the fan.:D

Dan D. Doty
07-17-2010, 11:20 PM
I have two bug out bags myself.

I'm twenty miles south of Saint Louis and this area will get at least five nuke hits, so I can't dig in and wait it out.

You'll need a good bike, backpack, food for a week ,or more, water filter ( two canteens), two good knives ( always have a back-up knife, learned that from Robert Heinlein), multi-tool, wire saw, entrenching tool, good melee weapon, and a couple of firearms.

Know where you are going, find three different routes there, make sure you have supplies waiting there for you, have tradable skills, and be ready to defend your life.

Seeking life is not a sin; but some jackass will try to convince you it is.

Becareful because Moonbats, jerkazoids and other assorted idiots will want you to die with them because they made the wrong choose. Had jerkazoids tell me " I'd rather die then survive in post-diaster world. " And I would respond " Good, just make sure all your stuff is in one place so it won't take me so long to collect it.."

Articulate_Ape
07-18-2010, 12:08 AM
Kill your neighbors now and freeze-dry the meat. Make hay while the sun shines is my motto.

Rockntractor
07-18-2010, 12:14 AM
Kill your neighbors now and freeze-dry the meat. Make hay while the sun shines is my motto.

I will seek out only vegetarians.

Articulate_Ape
07-18-2010, 01:05 AM
I will seek out only vegetarians.

That'll do pig; that'll do.

Ranger Rick
07-18-2010, 04:36 PM
Toilet paper... Don't forget toilet paper.

Also, if a SHTF scenario ever unfolds, they're coming to confiscate your firearms. They already did it after hurricane Katrina, even in the 'high and dry' areas in neighborhoods with million dollar houses. This is what they do the first chance they get.

For a taste of the End of the World SHTF try this Katrina bog http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/0005.html

There is also an interesting discussion on the Highroad.us board. Here http://www.thehighroad.us/showthread.php?t=419124

Tecate
07-18-2010, 08:50 PM
which is why it pays to have a couple from granddad that were never registered . . . .
I agree. Also, it's probably a good idea not to store all of your firearms in the same place if you can help it.

PoliCon
07-18-2010, 10:13 PM
I agree. Also, it's probably a good idea not to store all of your firearms in the same place if you can help it.

very true. One in the car - one in the garage - one in the kitchen - one in the bedroom . . . .