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Gingersnap
07-28-2010, 12:53 PM
Doomsday shelters making a comeback

By Keith Matheny, USA TODAY

Jason Hodge, father of four children from Barstow, Calif., says he's "not paranoid" but he is concerned, and that's why he bought space in what might be labeled a doomsday shelter. Hodge bought into the first of a proposed nationwide group of 20 fortified, underground shelters the Vivos shelter network that are intended to protect those inside for up to a year from catastrophes such as a nuclear attack, killer asteroids or tsunamis, according to the project's developers.

"It's an investment in life," says Hodge, a Teamsters union representative. "I want to make sure I have a place I can take me and my family if that worst-case scenario were to happen."

There are signs that underground shelters, almost-forgotten relics of the Cold War era, are making a comeback.

The Vivos network, which offers partial ownerships similar to a timeshare in underground shelter communities, is one of several ventures touting escape from a surface-level calamity.

Radius Engineering in Terrell, Texas, has built underground shelters for more than three decades, and business has never been better, says Walton McCarthy, company president. The company sells fiberglass shelters that can accommodate 10 to 2,000 adults to live underground for one to five years with power, food, water and filtered air, McCarthy says.

The shelters range from $400,000 to a $41 million facility Radius built and installed underground that is suitable for 750 people, McCarthy says. He declined to disclose the client or location of the shelter.

"We've doubled sales every year for five years," he says.Other shelter manufacturers include Hardened Structures of Colorado and Utah Shelter Systems, which also report increased sales.

The shelters have their critics. Ken Rose, a history professor at California State University-Chico and author of One Nation Underground: The Fallout Shelter in American Culture, says underground shelters were a bad idea a half-century ago and they're a bad idea now.

"A terrorist with a nuke in a suitcase pales in comparison to what the Cold War had to offer in the 1950s and '60s, which was the potential annihilation of the human race," he says.

Steve Davis, president of Maryland-based All Hands Global Emergency Management Consulting, also is skeptical.

All Hands has helped more than 100 public and private sector clients with emergency management and homeland security services, according to its website.

The types of cataclysms envisioned by some shelter manufacturers "are highly unlikely compared to what we know is going to happen," Davis says.

"We know there is going to be a major earthquake someday on the West Coast. We know a hurricane is going to hit Florida, the Gulf Coast, the East Coast," he says. "We support reasonable preparedness. We don't think it's necessary to burrow into the desert."

Much more at the link.

USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2010-07-28-doomsday28_ST_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip)

lacarnut
07-29-2010, 08:34 AM
My question is what happens when those on the outside that have not prepared decide they want to steal what you have squirreled away in that shelter?

Gingersnap
07-29-2010, 10:36 AM
My question is what happens when those on the outside that have not prepared decide they want to steal what you have squirreled away in that shelter?

That's where your home "arsenal" comes into play. :cool:

lacarnut
07-29-2010, 12:52 PM
That's where your home "arsenal" comes into play. :cool:

I have got that part covered; don't want to be in some bunker compound with a bunch of people I might not know or like. I will take my chances at home.

noonwitch
07-29-2010, 01:22 PM
If all life on earth was wiped out, I don't know if I'd really want to be one of the survivors. The movies I've seen with such themes don't exactly give much hope, except maybe The Stand.

SarasotaRepub
07-29-2010, 09:50 PM
If all life on earth was wiped out, I don't know if I'd really want to be one of the survivors. The movies I've seen with such themes don't exactly give much hope, except maybe The Stand.

Look at it this way, you know all those DUmmies that said they were leaving the USA??? You have instant slaves!!!! :p:D

noonwitch
07-30-2010, 08:44 AM
Look at it this way, you know all those DUmmies that said they were leaving the USA??? You have instant slaves!!!! :p:D


Yeah, but to get them to do anything, I have to have a truck full of Cheetos to bribe them with. Plus, I'll probably have to whip them hourly to keep them from slacking off.

MountainMan
08-01-2010, 06:01 PM
When I finally become financially able too, this is who I will be contacting: http://www.northwestsheltersystems.com/


They got some pretty cool designs.

m00
08-01-2010, 07:46 PM
When I finally become financially able too, this is who I will be contacting: http://www.northwestsheltersystems.com/


They got some pretty cool designs.

My concern about shelters is that food/water is ultimately limited. I suppose if your house happens to be sitting above some deep aquifer then you're lucky. Even luckier if you can power your shelter with geothermal. I wonder how much space you would need dedicated to underground agriculture for it to be a true Vault.