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View Full Version : Do it yourself? Not likely if you're under 35.



Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 02:58 PM
Do it yourself? Not likely if you're under 35. More than half are DIY dunces who can't even rewire a plug and have to rely on parents

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 7:35 PM on 23rd August 2010

More than half of young people lack the skills they need to maintain their homes, with many relying on their parents to carry out basic tasks, a survey suggested today. Around 50 per cent of people aged under 35 admitted they did not know how to rewire a plug, while 54 per cent did not know how to bleed a radiator and 63 per cent said they would not attempt to put up wallpaper, according to Halifax Home Insurance.

Other basic jobs, such as putting up shelves, were beyond 45 per cent of those questioned, while 36 per cent said they would not even attempt to do gardening themselves. Instead 42 per cent would pay a professional to do the work.

Nearly two-thirds of young people admitted that their father was far better at DIY than they were.

The study also found that when the under 35s do attempt to do a job themselves and it goes wrong, it costs nearly three times as much to fix as problems caused by other age groups. The average cost of putting right a botched DIY job carried out by someone under 35 is 2,498, compared with around 838 for those aged over 45.

That's sad. Most of them won't be able to afford a handyman by the time their parents don't want to do it anymore.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1305500/Do-Not-likely-youre-35--Survey-finds-young-people-DIY-dunces-rewire-plug.html#ixzz0xSO2NdOC

Arroyo_Doble
08-23-2010, 03:16 PM
I am pretty much self taught on home repairs and in the beginning (pre-35), I wasn't that great.

I improved.

As a side note, the next time the house gets painted, I am shelling out the money. Some things are just worth it.

PoliCon
08-23-2010, 03:21 PM
If their parents had made them do some work rather than allowing them to spend all day playing video games while they were growing up - things might be different.

linda22003
08-23-2010, 03:54 PM
Their parents really COULD have shown them how. :rolleyes:

noonwitch
08-23-2010, 03:59 PM
I don't know how to rewire a plug. I call my uncle for stuff like that.

malloc
08-23-2010, 04:00 PM
I grew up on a construction site, and worked for my dad's construction company from the time I could walk until I joined the Marines, and even for a while after I got out. I can do anything that needs to be done at my house except for advanced heating and air. I can do the A/C fuses, run duct work, freon recharge, etc. But beyond that, I have to call a professional. I'm only 31, but I've been able to do these things my whole life. The same goes for automotive as well. My dad has been a gear head since he was a kid, so we've rebuilt many engines and transmissions together. I have to admit that I find modern vehicles much more intimidating and harder to troubleshoot though. Everything modern is computer controlled and has very close tolerances.

marv
08-23-2010, 04:05 PM
If their parents had made them do some work rather than allowing them to spend all day playing video games while they were growing up - things might be different.
Absolutely right!

I learned it all from my Dad - in the early fifties - before we had B/W television for four hours a day in Kansas City!

bijou
08-23-2010, 04:20 PM
I can turn my hand to most DIY except that involving wiring or gas. I call on a professional if the time it will take to do a job means that it makes economic sense for me to pay someone else to do it and use the time to earn money.

Arroyo_Doble
08-23-2010, 04:22 PM
I can turn my hand to most DIY except that involving wiring or gas. I call on a professional if the time it will take to do a job means that it makes economic sense for me to pay someone else to do it and use the time to earn money.

I do alot of stuff on my own and I will only touch above-the-floor when it comes to gas.

Too much room for boom.

Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 04:32 PM
I don't know how to rewire a plug. I call my uncle for stuff like that.

Rewiring a plug is about the easiest project you can do. Seriously, even Linda Numbers could do it. :p

bflavin
08-23-2010, 04:39 PM
I'm 24. I grew up on a farm and I learned some from my dad there, but there is a lot I don't know how to do. I know how to rewire outlets and switches and know a very little about plumbing. I had him help me build a loft in my garage because 1) I didn't know how to, and 2) he has power tools, and I don't.

I think my winter project will be rebuilding the closet in our bedroom. The asshole who remodeled our house before we built it didn't bother drilling half of it into the studs, so part of the hangers tore out of the sheetrock when we hung stuff on them.

Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 05:02 PM
I'm 24. I grew up on a farm and I learned some from my dad there, but there is a lot I don't know how to do. I know how to rewire outlets and switches and know a very little about plumbing. I had him help me build a loft in my garage because 1) I didn't know how to, and 2) he has power tools, and I don't.

I think my winter project will be rebuilding the closet in our bedroom. The asshole who remodeled our house before we built it didn't bother drilling half of it into the studs, so part of the hangers tore out of the sheetrock when we hung stuff on them.

Plumbing is tricky stuff. Replacing sinks and faucets or resolving minor clogs and stopping leaks are one thing, dealing with sewer pipes, pressure issues, and installing exterior faucets is something else. Like electrical matters, you not only want to do it correctly but if it's an involved job, you really need to know the code.

malloc
08-23-2010, 05:07 PM
Plumbing is tricky stuff. Replacing sinks and faucets or resolving minor clogs and stopping leaks are one thing, dealing with sewer pipes, pressure issues, and installing exterior faucets is something else. Like electrical matters, you not only want to do it correctly but if it's an involved job, you really need to know the code.

Around here, almost all houses are plumbed with copper & sweat jointed water lines, and ABS or PVC sewer lines. This type of plumbing is very easy to work with and is pretty much within code if it doesn't leak. Actual sewer lines, not just drains, require some more thought because they have to slope at a certain angle. However, anyone with a propane torch and few minutes to read or watch a YouTube how-to, can easily run water wherever they need it.

Some of the much, much older houses use galvanized steel, and this can be a PITA, and requires threading equipment. It's probably not recommended to work with for the do-it-yourselfer, unless one is just using a saddle-patch to fix a leak.

jendf
08-23-2010, 07:47 PM
I've been learning a lot from Dear Ol' Dad since I moved into my house last year. I didn't know how to do a lot regarding home repair. Growing up, Dad took care of all the around the house stuff. Then I lived in an apartment and just called maintenance. Thanks to my dad, I'm slowly building my skill set around the house and I've been able to tackle some things on my own. There's no shame in asking for help though. We aren't born with that kind of knowledge and in a lot of cases (especially around the house), a project requires an extra set of hands anyway.

Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 08:28 PM
Being a homeowner means being a jack-of-all-trades unless you have money to burn. Even then, there's no excuse for rampant stupidity.

A couple of years ago the BFF's daughter and her then boyfriend decided to go skiing for the weekend. Pretty normal out here. She also decided to turn off the heat to save money while she was gone.

Her excuse was that it was still in the 60s during the day. :eek:

Constitutionally Speaking
08-23-2010, 08:51 PM
Being a homeowner means being a jack-of-all-trades unless you have money to burn. Even then, there's no excuse for rampant stupidity.

A couple of years ago the BFF's daughter and her then boyfriend decided to go skiing for the weekend. Pretty normal out here. She also decided to turn off the heat to save money while she was gone.

Her excuse was that it was still in the 60s during the day. :eek:


Saved quite a bit didn't they!!! :D

Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 09:00 PM
Saved quite a bit didn't they!!! :D

She saved maybe $5 bucks. Her folks shelled out for floor refinishing, drywall repair, and carpet management to the tune of of about $3,000.

SaintLouieWoman
08-23-2010, 09:14 PM
I can turn my hand to most DIY except that involving wiring or gas. I call on a professional if the time it will take to do a job means that it makes economic sense for me to pay someone else to do it and use the time to earn money.

I found a handyman/painter/decorator here who is honest, talented and presents reasonable bills. The kitchen faucet literally fell apart shortly after we moved in. The plumbing, which the not so talented and perhaps not honest inspector said was perfect, presented many problems.

For $40 he installed the new faucet, fixed the leaks that he discovered under the sink, repaired a faucet in the shower that wasn't functioning correctly and did some caulking around the bathrooms.

It wouldn't pay for us to try to fix it ourselves in this case. Plus he knows, like you, that electrical problems (other than simple switches and light fixture or fan installations, should be done by a professional.

I'm calling an electrician tomorrow for problems with the electrical box. I need to take pictures of some of the obvious code violations to add to my list of evidence that the inspector did nothing and was working with our not so talented real estate agent.

Zeus
08-23-2010, 09:28 PM
I can do it all. Learned a lot from my father and even more from the guy from who I eventually bought my first construction company.

bflavin
08-23-2010, 09:38 PM
Yeah, if it's a big project I'm not about to touch it. My granddad was a plumber forever and helped my dad a lot when he added on to our house. I'm a little more comfortable with the electical part, and if bad comes to worse my brother in law is an electrician, so I can call him.

malloc
08-23-2010, 09:42 PM
I can do it all. Learned a lot from my father and even more from the guy from who I eventually bought my first construction company.

It's a blessing and a curse to have the know-how of a construction background. On the one hand, guys with this background can build a house from the ground up if it were necessary, so expensive remodels and repairs, like replacing a hot water heater are no sweat. However, once your wife or girlfriend and their family learns you know how to do this.....kind of makes you sorry you ever opened your mouth.

I made the same mistake with my IT career, and became everyone's go-to computer repair guy. However, now I tell everybody I've been working solely with Unix for the past 7 years and don't remember a thing about windows, and they believe me. :D

JackKetch
08-23-2010, 10:04 PM
She saved maybe $5 bucks. Her folks shelled out for floor refinishing, drywall repair, and carpet management to the tune of of about $3,000.

so she saved $5 and got her place redone at her parents' expense! what a sweet deal. :D

JackKetch
08-23-2010, 10:08 PM
I made the same mistake with my IT career, and became everyone's go-to computer repair guy. However, now I tell everybody I've been working solely with Unix for the past 7 years and don't remember a thing about windows, and they believe me. :D

that's an excuse i have to remember for future use.

Gingersnap
08-23-2010, 11:15 PM
so she saved $5 and got her place redone at her parents' expense! what a sweet deal. :D

Don't think we haven't collectively thought about that but truthfully, she's just too dumb to think that far ahead. :D

Zeus
08-24-2010, 12:32 AM
It's a blessing and a curse to have the know-how of a construction background. On the one hand, guys with this background can build a house from the ground up if it were necessary, so expensive remodels and repairs, like replacing a hot water heater are no sweat. However, once your wife or girlfriend and their family learns you know how to do this.....kind of makes you sorry you ever opened your mouth.

I made the same mistake with my IT career, and became everyone's go-to computer repair guy. However, now I tell everybody I've been working solely with Unix for the past 7 years and don't remember a thing about windows, and they believe me. :D

I quickly cured people of thinking they could use me and abuse me for my talents. I informed them I was sending over an employee to do the job for themselves and compensation was between them and whomever I send over.

I do some little jobs myself occasionaly for baked goods or otherwise prepared foods. I eat good :D

malloc
08-24-2010, 06:06 AM
I quickly cured people of thinking they could use me and abuse me for my talents. I informed them I was sending over an employee to do the job for themselves and compensation was between them and whomever I send over.

I do some little jobs myself occasionaly for baked goods or otherwise prepared foods. I eat good :D

It's not like I completely lied. I mean, I've been working solely on Unix (Linux/BSD) solutions for 7 years, and I've probably forgotten more about Windows than I'll ever remember. However, I like this new idea, "For a twelve pack of Sam Adams and some short ribs, I just might could remember what 'Missing DLL' meant."

This is workable.

djones520
08-24-2010, 06:28 AM
I know a lot of real basic stuff, and I know where to go to find info on more involved home repairs. I need to get back to a base were I have a regular job that lets me get out and meet people in other career fields. Like HVAC, Pluming, etc... :D

linda22003
08-24-2010, 08:57 AM
Rewiring a plug is about the easiest project you can do. Seriously, even Linda Numbers could do it. :p

Can't prove it by me. I don't intend to find out.

Gingersnap
08-24-2010, 09:40 AM
Can't prove it by me. I don't intend to find out.

You're sitting there with a pair of wire cutters right now, aren't you? :D

linda22003
08-24-2010, 10:42 AM
You're sitting there with a pair of wire cutters right now, aren't you? :D

Are those like pliers?

Shannon
08-24-2010, 10:49 AM
Are those like pliers?

Good question.

Gingersnap
08-24-2010, 12:22 PM
Are those like pliers?

Sometimes.