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PoliCon
09-06-2010, 10:58 AM
By Karen Berkman

Updated September 6, 2010 09:22:00
A depressed young woman sits on steps

The idea that traumatised people, especially the victims of child sexual abuse, deliberately repress horrific memories goes all the way back to the 19th century and the theories of Sigmund Freud himself.

But now some experts are saying the evidence points the other way.

Professor Grant Devilly, from Griffith University's Psychological Health research unit, says the memory usually works in the opposite way, with traumatised people reliving experiences they would rather forget.

"It's the opposite. They wish they couldn't think about it," he said.

In a briefing to the US Supreme Court, Professor Richard McNally from Harvard University described the theory of repressed memory as "the most pernicious bit of folklore ever to infect psychology and psychiatry".

He maintains false memories can easily be created by inept therapists.

"The stress hormones that are released during a trauma tend to consolidate the memory, make it rather strong and sometimes even intrusive, as you see in post-traumatic stress disorder," he said.

But Professor McNally says some abuse victims do suffer when they reassess childhood experiences much later.

"Seeing the event through the eyes of adult, they realise what has happened to them and now they experience the emotional turmoil of trauma," he said.

The good news is that now, Professor McNally says most victims can be helped.

"Things have changed, happily. We now have treatments that work," he said.

Soldiers returning from war zones, victims of violent crime and sexual abuse, can now be helped by cognitive behaviour therapy, where they learn to assign terrible memories to the past, instead of them crowding their present and future.

Professor Devilly says the therapy is working.

"We're now getting, at the end of between 8 and 12 sessions, 90 to 92 per cent of people no longer meet the criteria for PTSD," he said.

Now psychologists are working to fend off post traumatic stress in high-risk occupations, by teaching recruits to develop resilience.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/09/06/3003364.htm?section=world

warpig
09-06-2010, 10:59 AM
We needed research to know this??

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 11:13 AM
This writer clearly as little to no understanding of psychoanalytic theory.

warpig
09-06-2010, 11:14 AM
This writer clearly as little to no understanding of psychoanalytic theory.

Why Wee Wee, What are your repressing?

PoliCon
09-06-2010, 11:15 AM
This writer clearly as little to no understanding of psychoanalytic theory.

WTF? Have you ever experience an extremely traumatizing event? I know I have and believe you me, I'd LOVE For it to go away.

djones520
09-06-2010, 11:17 AM
I can't speak for others, but nothing was repressed when I was molested. I remember every chilling moment quite clearly.

*shrugs* I don't understand peoples needs for therapy in stuff like that. I understand what happened, I understand what would happen if I ever come face to face with the perp again. I'm at peace with it all. If there was anything that could help bring "closure" it would be to have Florida lift it's statute of limitations on the laws so I can press charges.

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 11:24 AM
Represssion is a neurotic phenomenon, like foreclosure is a psychotic phenomenon and disavowal is a perverted phenomenon. Also, a traumatic event isn't like a thought-object that intrudes, it's part of the very psychic structure itself, a sort of warping of the grid that your consciousness is unvieled upon.

The idea behind repression is that it does NOT actually go away (that's foreclosure), in fact it's expected to come back again and again.

BadCat
09-06-2010, 11:27 AM
Represssion is a neurotic phenomenon, like foreclosure is a psychotic phenomenon and disavowal is a perverted phenomenon. Also, a traumatic event isn't like a thought-object that intrudes, it's part of the very psychic structure itself, a sort of warping of the grid that your consciousness is unvieled upon.

The idea behind repression is that it does NOT actually go away (that's foreclosure), in fact it's expected to come back again and again.

And I suppose you're going to prove it actually happens?

warpig
09-06-2010, 11:29 AM
You know at one time a writer compiled a list of the thing the communist party would try to do to help cause the downfall of America. There were 45 "goals" on the list, these are 2 of them.
Just sayin'............

38. Transfer some of the powers of arrest from the police to social agencies. Treat all behavioral problems as psychiatric disorders which no one but psychiatrists can understand [or treat].

39. Dominate the psychiatric profession and use mental health laws as a means of gaining coercive control over those who oppose Communist goals.

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 11:30 AM
No can't do that. That's the revolutionary thing about Fruedian theory, as well as Marx - the theory is so radical and so "unprovable" in the empiracle sense (consciousness/unconsciousness can't be proven, nor can class struggle), however it's imposssible NOT to take them into account when trying to disprove them. In a way, the only way to be post-marxian or post-fruedian is to use the coordinates they left with us. a bit ironic, but very cool.

probably the best "proof" for psychoanalytic theory would be case studies, and if you're looking for stuff on repression, just search for case studies of neurotics and especially for hysterics.

Jfor
09-06-2010, 11:43 AM
No can't do that. That's the revolutionary thing about Fruedian theory, as well as Marx - the theory is so radical and so "unprovable" in the empiracle sense (consciousness/unconsciousness can't be proven, nor can class struggle), however it's imposssible NOT to take them into account when trying to disprove them. In a way, the only way to be post-marxian or post-fruedian is to use the coordinates they left with us. a bit ironic, but very cool.

probably the best "proof" for psychoanalytic theory would be case studies, and if you're looking for stuff on repression, just search for case studies of neurotics and especially for hysterics.

Get a fucking job loser.

PoliCon
09-06-2010, 11:48 AM
This writer clearly as little to no understanding of psychoanalytic theory.

I guess you missed the point where the author was writing about the findings of multiple researchers? You know people with or pursuing doctorates in the field . . . clearly you know more than they do with what? Your high school diploma?

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 11:59 AM
psychoanalytic theory isn't taught along with contemporary psych degrees, I know because I have 2 degrees in the field and have done a lot of research work.

Psychanalysis is a largely seperate field from what is taught in clinical psych programs.

BadCat
09-06-2010, 12:06 PM
psychoanalytic theory isn't taught along with contemporary psych degrees, I know because I have 2 degrees in the field and have done a lot of research work.

Psychanalysis is a largely seperate field from what is taught in clinical psych programs.

Two degrees and an unemployed sponge?
Typical liberal.

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 12:11 PM
The idea that traumatised people, especially the victims of child sexual abuse, deliberately repress horrific memories goes all the way back to the 19th century and the theories of Sigmund Freud himself.

Look the very first sentence in the article demonstrates the author has literally no idea what she is talking about.

That is not at all the idea that freud had nor any psychoanalyst

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 12:12 PM
Two degrees and an unemployed sponge?
Typical liberal.

boohoo i'm working on further certifications so I can work in new fields.

hazlnut
09-06-2010, 12:15 PM
By Karen Berkman

Updated September 6, 2010 09:22:00
A depressed young woman sits on steps

The idea that traumatised people, especially the victims of child sexual abuse, deliberately repress horrific memories goes all the way back to the 19th century and the theories of Sigmund Freud himself.

But now some experts are saying the evidence points the other way.

Professor Grant Devilly, from Griffith University's Psychological Health research unit, says the memory usually works in the opposite way, with traumatised people reliving experiences they would rather forget.

"It's the opposite. They wish they couldn't think about it," he said.

In a briefing to the US Supreme Court, Professor Richard McNally from Harvard University described the theory of repressed memory as "the most pernicious bit of folklore ever to infect psychology and psychiatry".

He maintains false memories can easily be created by inept therapists.

"The stress hormones that are released during a trauma tend to consolidate the memory, make it rather strong and sometimes even intrusive, as you see in post-traumatic stress disorder," he said.

But Professor McNally says some abuse victims do suffer when they reassess childhood experiences much later.

"Seeing the event through the eyes of adult, they realise what has happened to them and now they experience the emotional turmoil of trauma," he said.

The good news is that now, Professor McNally says most victims can be helped.

"Things have changed, happily. We now have treatments that work," he said.

Soldiers returning from war zones, victims of violent crime and sexual abuse, can now be helped by cognitive behaviour therapy, where they learn to assign terrible memories to the past, instead of them crowding their present and future.

Professor Devilly says the therapy is working.

"We're now getting, at the end of between 8 and 12 sessions, 90 to 92 per cent of people no longer meet the criteria for PTSD," he said.

Now psychologists are working to fend off post traumatic stress in high-risk occupations, by teaching recruits to develop resilience.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/09/06/3003364.htm?section=world

READ: One crackpot with a phd thinks he knows better than the rest of the world.

I agree, bad therapists can create false memories -- McMartin Preschool. But we repress things every minute of every day.

djones520
09-06-2010, 12:18 PM
READ: One crackpot with a phd thinks he knows better than the rest of the world.

I agree, bad therapists can create false memories -- McMartin Preschool. But we repress things every minute of every day.

Did you read? Cause it references more then just one. :rolleyes:

warpig
09-06-2010, 12:35 PM
That is not at all the idea that freud had nor any psychoanalyst

Freud, an ex heroin addict that used cocaine to cure himself.:rolleyes:

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 12:41 PM
Cocaine was very often used by intellectuals at the time. It's not much different than today's grad students taking adderalls to help study.

Rockntractor
09-06-2010, 12:49 PM
No can't do that. That's the revolutionary thing about Fruedian theory, as well as Marx - the theory is so radical and so "unprovable" in the empiracle sense (consciousness/unconsciousness can't be proven, nor can class struggle), however it's imposssible NOT to take them into account when trying to disprove them. In a way, the only way to be post-marxian or post-fruedian is to use the coordinates they left with us. a bit ironic, but very cool.

probably the best "proof" for psychoanalytic theory would be case studies, and if you're looking for stuff on repression, just search for case studies of neurotics and especially for hysterics.

Fail, you don't exist.

djones520
09-06-2010, 12:51 PM
Cocaine was very often used by intellectuals at the time. It's not much different than today's grad students taking adderalls to help study.

Your point? Are you saying cocaine didn't fuck with the head back then? :rolleyes:

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 12:54 PM
Your point? Are you saying cocaine didn't fuck with the head back then? :rolleyes:

I'm saying applying the standards of contemporary "drug culture" and drug stereotypes to people in another century isn't appropriate. Modern scholars who use amphetamines aren't far off from thinkers of past centuries who used cocaine.

You can use cocaine and still be a brilliant thinker. Anyone who views drug use in some draconinan all-or-nothing reefer madness perspective is an idiot.

BadCat
09-06-2010, 12:58 PM
boohoo i'm working on further certifications so I can work in new fields.

Fluffer in gay porn doesn't need a certification.

djones520
09-06-2010, 01:03 PM
I'm saying applying the standards of contemporary "drug culture" and drug stereotypes to people in another century isn't appropriate. Modern scholars who use amphetamines aren't far off from thinkers of past centuries who used cocaine.

You can use cocaine and still be a brilliant thinker. Anyone who views drug use in some draconinan all-or-nothing reefer madness perspective is an idiot.

And at what point are those "thinkings" not affected by the chronic long term affects of the use of Cocaine? We know it's a highly addictive drug. The more they used it to free their mind, the more they had to use it, and the more it damaged their brains.

Give me the thinkings of a man who hasn't fucked his head up with drugs anyday.

Cocaine screws your head up. Fact. Saying it was ok because everyone was doing it. Stupid.

warpig
09-06-2010, 01:06 PM
Your point? Are you saying cocaine didn't fuck with the head back then? :rolleyes:

Well at least back then they didn't snort it, they shot it into their veins instead. :rolleyes: and at least Freud knew he had a problem with heroin. :cool:

PoliCon
09-06-2010, 01:07 PM
Two degrees and an unemployed sponge?
Typical liberal.

Do you honestly buy that he has a single degree - let alone 2?

nightflight
09-06-2010, 01:07 PM
So how successful was Freud in treating his clients?

Rockntractor
09-06-2010, 01:08 PM
READ: One crackpot with a phd thinks he knows better than the rest of the world.

I agree, bad therapists can create false memories -- McMartin Preschool. But we repress things every minute of every day.

Hazel you have been most most cordially invited to a party in your honor at the thunderdome.:)

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 01:15 PM
And at what point are those "thinkings" not affected by the chronic long term affects of the use of Cocaine? We know it's a highly addictive drug. The more they used it to free their mind, the more they had to use it, and the more it damaged their brains.

Give me the thinkings of a man who hasn't fucked his head up with drugs anyday.

Cocaine screws your head up. Fact. Saying it was ok because everyone was doing it. Stupid.

It's not an issue of morality. Everyone uses drugs, all that changes is societal attitudes towards it.

Did cocaine affect freuds thinking? probably, thankfuly though we have a century of later thinkers who examined, tweaked, and refined his theory.

Today's psychoanalysis is nothing like that of Freud in his own time, but his influence is undeniable.

Odysseus
09-06-2010, 01:24 PM
READ: One crackpot with a phd thinks he knows better than the rest of the world.

I agree, bad therapists can create false memories -- McMartin Preschool. But we repress things every minute of every day.

Good point. You've been repressing logic since you got here.

BadCat
09-06-2010, 02:40 PM
It's not an issue of morality. Everyone uses drugs, all that changes is societal attitudes towards it.

Did cocaine affect freuds thinking? probably, thankfuly though we have a century of later thinkers who examined, tweaked, and refined his theory.

Today's psychoanalysis is nothing like that of Freud in his own time, but his influence is undeniable.

No wonder you're so fucked up.

EVERYONE uses drugs?

Not in the real world, moonbat.

Wei Wu Wei
09-06-2010, 02:42 PM
No wonder you're so fucked up.

EVERYONE uses drugs?

Not in the real world, moonbat.

okay not everyone but the majority of people in most cultures partake in some drug use or another

BadCat
09-06-2010, 04:40 PM
okay not everyone but the majority of people in most cultures partake in some drug use or another


Try again.
Assuming you're not talking about some sort of medication.

PoliCon
09-06-2010, 04:56 PM
okay not everyone but the majority of people in most cultures partake in some drug use or another
maybe in YOUR circles. Not in mine.

BadCat
09-06-2010, 05:00 PM
maybe in YOUR circles. Not in mine.

His "circles" must mean unemployed freeloading losers, like himself.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 01:03 AM
I'm including substances such as achohol, tobacco, caffeine, pain medication, ect. ect.

lacarnut
09-07-2010, 02:32 AM
I'm including substances such as achohol, tobacco, caffeine, pain medication, ect. ect.

You full of shit as a Christmas Turkey. We know what you meant, and it's the illegal stuff you were speaking of. Druggie

noonwitch
09-07-2010, 09:42 AM
I think it is possible to repress memories, to a certain extent, but there will always be something that can trigger the memories, and then the person voluntarily either stuffs those unpleasant memories down deeper or replaces them with other mental images. When a therapist with his or her own issues projects those memories into the subject at the point in which he or she is replacing those images(not all childhood trauma is sexual abuse), then you get these crazy claims 40 years later of sexual abuse against parents who never abused their children.


I've seen this-we had a therapist who used to do a lot of our training in the late 80s that has been totally discredited for using manipulative techniques to get children to make accusations of sexual abuse in cases where there was no physical evidence or previous history. The case that was the clincher for her career involved a divorce custody dispute in which accusations were made against the father by the mother, initially, then the therapist interviewed the kid and got her to say it. The father fought back and won.


Freud was full of shit about child sexual abuse, however. He initially believed it happened, then later came up with the theory that little girls make up accusations of sexual abuse because they are sexually attracted to men, including their fathers. F-ing austrians.

Odysseus
09-07-2010, 09:56 AM
I'm including substances such as achohol, tobacco, caffeine, pain medication, ect. ect.

If you stretch the definition of drugs to include anything that has any effect on the human body, then you are correct. Of course, that definition is so broad as to render meaningful discussion impossible, but we have not come to expect meaningful discussion from you, so it's moot.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 10:07 AM
If you stretch the definition of drugs to include anything that has any effect on the human body, then you are correct. Of course, that definition is so broad as to render meaningful discussion impossible, but we have not come to expect meaningful discussion from you, so it's moot.

I'm using the usual standard definition of a drug, which includes caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and pain killers

FlaGator
09-07-2010, 10:09 AM
okay not everyone but the majority of people in most cultures partake in some drug use or another

I used drugs, both licit and illicit and in retrospect it was the worse decision I could have made. It muddled my thinking and not just while I was under the effects of the substances but long term. I realize now that it took years to completely clear my mind of the effects of the drugs I used.

To say that Freud was under the effects of drugs while refining his techniques doesn't say much for his techniques. That others came along (other drug users by your own statement) and tweaked his flawed theories doesn't say much for them either. Some one can't make right that which is basically wrong to begin with. The fact that their drug use may have prevented them from realizing that the theory was wrong says nothing of them and their abilities.

One other thing, someone.. maybe you, stated that one PhD was going against the rest of the PhD's who believe that surpressed memories are real, implying that because of this his view was wrong. I will point you to Copernicus who said that the planets in our solar system revolved around the sun even though the scientific concensous at the time was just the opposite. One man was right and everyone else was wrong. Interesting isn't it.

hazlnut
09-07-2010, 10:17 AM
I think this joker is creating a little business for himself -- he'll be the exclusive provider of this nonsense theory at trials all over the country.

Child molesters rejoice, you now have someone who can get you off.

Gingersnap
09-07-2010, 10:33 AM
This writer clearly as little to no understanding of psychoanalytic theory.

Or the writer (and the many numerous researchers in this area) have been educated since 1936 and understand that virtually all of Freud's theories have been relegated to the historical trash-heap.

Thousands of lives were irreparably harmed because of this fad. A fad enthusiastically embraced by ideologically driven therapists, teachers, and social workers (along with an unfortunate number of police and prosecutors who relied on "expert" testimony).

Those of us who have lived through traumatic events (even in childhood) have no trouble at all remembering the incidents. On the contrary, it takes a little doing to reframe those memories so that they don't come to mind in a pointless or destructive way.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 10:39 AM
Or the writer (and the many numerous researchers in this area) have been educated since 1936 and understand that virtually all of Freud's theories have been relegated to the historical trash-heap.

Try reading Lacan.




Thousands of lives were irreparably harmed because of this fad. A fad enthusiastically embraced by ideologically driven therapists, teachers, and social workers (along with an unfortunate number of police and prosecutors who relied on "expert" testimony).

Those of us who have lived through traumatic events (even in childhood) have no trouble at all remembering the incidents. On the contrary, it takes a little doing to reframe those memories so that they don't come to mind in a pointless or destructive way.

From all these comments I still doubt that people understand what repression is and how it works, the same with psychoanalysis.

Odysseus
09-07-2010, 10:44 AM
I'm using the usual standard definition of a drug, which includes caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and pain killers
Comparing cocaine to caffeine for the sake of a cheap point in an online discussion is, well, typical of you.

I think this joker is creating a little business for himself -- he'll be the exclusive provider of this nonsense theory at trials all over the country.

Child molesters rejoice, you now have someone who can get you off.
Look at the bright side: It will save liberals a tremendous amount of effort, since you are invariably opposed to registration of sex offenders, long jail sentences or other measures that work. You won't have to argue for therapy or some other vague, feel-good BS in lieu of justice. This guy, if he is correct, makes the ACLU's job easier.

BTW, you're wanted in another thread. http://www.conservativeunderground.com/forum505/showthread.php?t=31583

Gingersnap
09-07-2010, 10:53 AM
Try reading Lacan.

From all these comments I still doubt that people understand what repression is and how it works, the same with psychoanalysis.

Psychoanalytic theory is no longer taught within mainstream psychology and psychiatric programs because it has been found to be a fairly worthless way of teaching coping skills and because the underpinnings of the theories have become unraveled due to advances in both brain science and in behavioral therapy.

I understand what the "repression" mechanism is within this context. I also understand perfectly the theory behind homeopathy. My understanding and/or the enthusiastic fervor both these theoretical concepts enjoyed at one point is irrelevant. Neither area has more than a fringe acceptance today.

At least with homeopathy, the healthy/healthy-enough patient will do herself no real harm playing around with Bach flower essences and 100x violet tinctures. The same cannot be said for those unfortunates who have been led astray by the late 20th century version of Freud's work.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 11:03 AM
Psychoanalytic theory is no longer taught within mainstream psychology and psychiatric programs because it has been found to be a fairly worthless way of teaching coping skills and because the underpinnings of the theories have become unraveled due to advances in both brain science and in behavioral therapy.

You're right, most therapeutic psych programs are ego-psychology based. They offer coping skills and try to boost self-image. People feel good when they get these things. This is not the goal of psychoanalysis. Modern Psychology and Psychoanalysis have certainly diverged quite a bit, it's not long before even today's ego-psychology is replaced with simple drug-treatment for all problems.

Still, looking at Freud's original theory when talking about psychoanalysis is like looking at Newton when talking about physics. I suggest Lacan.





I understand what the "repression" mechanism is within this context. I also understand perfectly the theory behind homeopathy. My understanding and/or the enthusiastic fervor both these theoretical concepts enjoyed at one point is irrelevant. Neither area has more than a fringe acceptance today.

At least with homeopathy, the healthy/healthy-enough patient will do herself no real harm playing around with Bach flower essences and 100x violet tinctures. The same cannot be said for those unfortunates who have been led astray by the late 20th century version of Freud's work.

Psychology today has taken more of an empiricist stance, looking only at what is immediately observable (which is tricky when dealing with thinking, feeling, human beings) and relying more and more on simple "symptom reduction" which can be attained with drugs or very simple yet unhelpful (in fixing root causes of problems) strategies to stave off anxiety.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 11:06 AM
Comparing cocaine to caffeine for the sake of a cheap point in an online discussion is, well, typical of you.

It's not that far off. Really small doses of cocaine have similar effects to moderate doses of caffeine. Hell coca-cola used to use the coca plant in their drink and replaced it with caffeine because of their rough similarity.

No one is suggesting that huge cocaine binges or long-term abuse is good, but times change. Think about how some cities and some resturants today look down on smoking cigarettes and think smokers are disgusting filthy drug addicts. Only 3 decades ago smoking was common place everywhere. Cigarettes haven't become much more dangerous, the effects are still the same. Attitudes change, even if the drugs don't.

Odysseus
09-07-2010, 11:16 AM
It's not that far off. Really small doses of cocaine have similar effects to moderate doses of caffeine. Hell coca-cola used to use the coca plant in their drink and replaced it with caffeine because of their rough similarity.

No one is suggesting that huge cocaine binges or long-term abuse is good, but times change. Think about how some cities and some resturants today look down on smoking cigarettes and think smokers are disgusting filthy drug addicts. Only 3 decades ago smoking was common place everywhere. Cigarettes haven't become much more dangerous, the effects are still the same. Attitudes change, even if the drugs don't.

This is actually a rational argument, although ultimately irrelevant to this thread. Still, it's rational. Who are you and what have you done with the real Wei?

noonwitch
09-07-2010, 01:41 PM
Psychoanalytic theory is no longer taught within mainstream psychology and psychiatric programs because it has been found to be a fairly worthless way of teaching coping skills and because the underpinnings of the theories have become unraveled due to advances in both brain science and in behavioral therapy.

I understand what the "repression" mechanism is within this context. I also understand perfectly the theory behind homeopathy. My understanding and/or the enthusiastic fervor both these theoretical concepts enjoyed at one point is irrelevant. Neither area has more than a fringe acceptance today.

At least with homeopathy, the healthy/healthy-enough patient will do herself no real harm playing around with Bach flower essences and 100x violet tinctures. The same cannot be said for those unfortunates who have been led astray by the late 20th century version of Freud's work.


When I was in college, majoring in social work, Freud wasn't really taught by the psych program at WMU (they were behaviorists) or the sociology program. I had a social psych class that touched on his theories and literature teachers who were big on freudian themes in 20th century literature. I think WMU had it right, to an extent, although I believe human psychology is about more than just operant conditioning.

Freud is now considered literature. That's how it should be. He was a messed up man whose theories were used to mess up generations of men and women.

Gingersnap
09-07-2010, 02:49 PM
When I was in college, majoring in social work, Freud wasn't really taught by the psych program at WMU (they were behaviorists) or the sociology program. I had a social psych class that touched on his theories and literature teachers who were big on freudian themes in 20th century literature. I think WMU had it right, to an extent, although I believe human psychology is about more than just operant conditioning.

Freud is now considered literature. That's how it should be. He was a messed up man whose theories were used to mess up generations of men and women.

Exactly. I doubt there is any coherent body of practical/theoretical psychology that has the complete and correct answers to human mental events.

Wei Wu Wei
09-07-2010, 03:11 PM
Exactly. I doubt there is any coherent body of practical/theoretical psychology that has the complete and correct answers to human mental events.

Naturally, it's probably the toughest area of study simply because it's ourselves.

Anyway, anyone interested in newer ideas of psychoanalysis (which is still taught and licensed and practiced, but usually not along side psych programs) can check here:

http://nosubject.com/Main_Page