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Gingersnap
09-15-2010, 03:49 PM
Amish population growing, heading west

By Jeff Martin, USA TODAY

TRIPP, S.D. Bright yellow signs with a horse and buggy symbol dot the gravel roads in the gently rolling hills near here, and the town has placed hitching posts for horses along Main Street.

The new road signs, more familiar in rural areas of Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, are emblems of a trend being seen in many Western states which are welcoming an increasing number of Amish.

The Amish population is growing and embarking on a westward migration that has now reached as far as Colorado, South Dakota and Montana, according to an annual survey by Elizabethtown College in Pennsylvania, which tracks the Amish.

In the past year, the North American Amish population has grown 5%, an increase from 237,500 in 2009 to 249,500 today, the survey found.

Amish communities are now in 28 states, and the continent's population will double by 2024 if the annual growth rate of around 5% continues, the survey says. The highest rates of growth over the past year were recorded in New York (19%), Minnesota (9%), Missouri (8%), Wisconsin (7%) and Illinois (7%). The survey attributes the population boom to Amish families tending to be large, with five children or more on average.

In Colorado, the Amish population has grown from an estimated 400 in 2007 to more than 800 today, according to the survey. Many live in a part of southern Colorado between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo mountains.

"They'd never been this far west and to see them come rolling in with their buggies and everything, they're kind of like pioneers rediscovering the Old West," says Bill Werner, a Realtor in Alamosa, Colo., who sold land to Amish when they stopped in to his real estate office about eight years ago.

"It was kind of cool to see three families that first settled here grow into that size of community," he says.

Reasons for the Amish migration are varied, but some have left states such as Ohio and Pennsylvania as development has encroached into the rural areas where they've traditionally lived, says Donald Kraybill, a professor at Elizabethtown College who has done extensive research on Amish culture.

"They may want a more rural area than where they were coming from," he says. "It happens in Ohio, around Cleveland. It just depends on where the settlement is."

A search for more affordable farmland also has driven the westward migration, Werner says. "Land prices here are probably $1,500 to $2,000 an acre on average for farm ground, and it's $6,000 an acre in Pennsylvania."

Very cool! I knew there were some Amish families around Alamosa but I had no idea that there are 810 Amish in Colorado. Check out the interactive map at the link.

USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/religion/2010-09-14-amish-population_N.htm)

NJCardFan
09-15-2010, 08:33 PM
We like going to Lancaster. Best furniture money can buy. All handmade and oak. Expensive but worth it.

SaintLouieWoman
09-15-2010, 10:24 PM
I buy most of our cheese, lunch meat, fruits and veggies, eggs from the Amish. There's a sizable settlement in the city of Sarasota. The women in particular still wear the traditional garb, with the long dresses, aprons, little caps. I haven't seen any horse and buggies, but most of the women ride bikes, as do many of the men.

They're good, hard working people. They're one of the best things about Sarasota----other than the beaches and Mote Marine.

Rockntractor
09-15-2010, 10:27 PM
I buy most of our cheese, lunch meat, fruits and veggies, eggs from the Amish. There's a sizable settlement in the city of Sarasota. The women in particular still wear the traditional garb, with the long dresses, aprons, little caps. I haven't seen any horse and buggies, but most of the women ride bikes, as do many of the men.

They're good, hard working people. They're one of the best things about Sarasota----other than the beaches and Mote Marine.

You can always find good anywhere!:)

NJCardFan
09-15-2010, 10:30 PM
The only thing I'm not too swift on when it comes to the Amish is their puppy mills. They are all over PA and the ASPCA has been trying to get them stopped. My cockapoo is a mill puppy according to my vet.

m00
09-15-2010, 10:35 PM
My cockapoo is a mill puppy according to my vet.

That's gotta be the gayest name for breed I ever heard. Is it used for hunting titmice or something? :D

Jumpy
09-16-2010, 06:16 AM
The only thing I'm not too swift on when it comes to the Amish is their puppy mills. They are all over PA and the ASPCA has been trying to get them stopped. My cockapoo is a mill puppy according to my vet.

But you certainly cannot judge all of the Amish based on a few bad eggs. That's like saying "The only thing I'm not too swift on when it comes to the Hispanics is their cock fighting"

In general, the Amish are no more holy or moral than the rest of the population. Same problems as everybody else, they just hide it better.

fettpett
09-16-2010, 07:44 AM
I buy most of our cheese, lunch meat, fruits and veggies, eggs from the Amish. There's a sizable settlement in the city of Sarasota. The women in particular still wear the traditional garb, with the long dresses, aprons, little caps. I haven't seen any horse and buggies, but most of the women ride bikes, as do many of the men.

They're good, hard working people. They're one of the best things about Sarasota----other than the beaches and Mote Marine.

are you sure they are Amish and Not Mennonite? many people confuse them, but Mennonite's will use machines. When I went down to Belize it was very strange to see the local Hispanic/Indian's intermingled with the Mennonite and Chinese populations. A Mennonite machine shop fixed our bus when it broke it's axle.

noonwitch
09-16-2010, 12:34 PM
We have an amish community in Michigan, about 20 miles or so north of Lansing in St. Johns. They build gazebos and other lawn things, and I think there's also a furniture store. They visit people in the jails there-not to prosyletize, but just to visit them because, that is what Jesus says to do. I respect that a great deal.

My sister used to live in Elkhart, IN, and there is a big amish community near there in Shipshewana.

I used to buy amish chicken at the expensive grocery store, but now I buy the Meijer brand. The amish kind, despite it's price, does taste a lot better than the store brands or Tyson.

Hawkgirl
09-16-2010, 05:57 PM
I buy most of our cheese, lunch meat, fruits and veggies, eggs from the Amish. There's a sizable settlement in the city of Sarasota. The women in particular still wear the traditional garb, with the long dresses, aprons, little caps. I haven't seen any horse and buggies, but most of the women ride bikes, as do many of the men.

They're good, hard working people. They're one of the best things about Sarasota----other than the beaches and Mote Marine.


I had no idea they were in Sarasota....One of my next vacations is bringing my daughter to Lancaster to see how the Amish live. I went as a child and was very impressed. I want to rent a house close by too. A visit to hershey park wouldn't hurt either while I'm there.

MountainMan
09-16-2010, 06:57 PM
Can't have a thread about the Amish and not discuss the merits of Scrapple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple).

Gingersnap
09-16-2010, 07:21 PM
I'm pro-scrapple.

Jumpy
09-16-2010, 09:26 PM
are you sure they are Amish and Not Mennonite? many people confuse them, but Mennonite's will use machines. When I went down to Belize it was very strange to see the local Hispanic/Indian's intermingled with the Mennonite and Chinese populations. A Mennonite machine shop fixed our bus when it broke it's axle.

Sarasota County has a large Old Order Amish community from Lancaster County.

Bubba Dawg
09-16-2010, 09:29 PM
Okay Ginger. They are in Colorado. You need to know this.

What is this:

klop klop klop klop klop BANG! klopklopklopklopklopklop!!!!!!!

\Amish drive-by shooting.

SaintLouieWoman
09-16-2010, 09:33 PM
Sarasota County has a large Old Order Amish community from Lancaster County.

Jumpy, they seem to use the terms Amish and Mennonite interchangeably here. There are no buggies here, or at least in the area along Bahia Vista street where there businesses seem to be centered. There are pictures of the buggies in murals on the walls at the Yoder's Fresh Market.

On my way to volunteer this morning at the Botanical Garden I saw an elderly Amish woman with the long dress, apron and cap on her 3 wheeler bike. I've seen quite a few men riding the bikes, too.

All of their businesses are closed on Sunday, without exception.

Jumpy
09-16-2010, 09:44 PM
Jumpy, they seem to use the terms Amish and Mennonite interchangeably here. There are no buggies here, or at least in the area along Bahia Vista street where there businesses seem to be centered. There are pictures of the buggies in murals on the walls at the Yoder's Fresh Market.

On my way to volunteer this morning at the Botanical Garden I saw an elderly Amish woman with the long dress, apron and cap on her 3 wheeler bike. I've seen quite a few men riding the bikes, too.

All of their businesses are closed on Sunday, without exception.

Yeah, they don't have the buggies because many of the elderly just Winter down there. At least the ones that my parents drive down from my area. They ride bike and those goofy 3 wheeler trikes. Plus while my parents are down there, they transport them in the van just like they do here at home.

Rockntractor
09-16-2010, 09:54 PM
Jumpy, they seem to use the terms Amish and Mennonite interchangeably here. There are no buggies here, or at least in the area along Bahia Vista street where there businesses seem to be centered. There are pictures of the buggies in murals on the walls at the Yoder's Fresh Market.

On my way to volunteer this morning at the Botanical Garden I saw an elderly Amish woman with the long dress, apron and cap on her 3 wheeler bike. I've seen quite a few men riding the bikes, too.

All of their businesses are closed on Sunday, without exception.

The Amish follow the teachings of Menno Simmons, thus Mennonites.

Rockntractor
09-16-2010, 10:01 PM
You have Amish Mennonites, haldeman mennonites etc etc...
They are all part of the Anabaptist Movement.