PDA

View Full Version : Bijou's new kitchen toy



bijou
09-17-2010, 02:15 PM
http://lakeland.scene7.com/is/image/Lakeland/12417?$normal2$

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/pasta-machine/F/keyword/pasta+maker/product/12417

I have wanted one for ages, and I finally got around to buying one. I'm hoping I actually get round to using it reasonably regularly. :D

hampshirebrit
09-17-2010, 02:19 PM
Coo... Looks great. I just don't think I have any more space for something like that (nor the money for it, either at the moment).

bijou
09-17-2010, 02:27 PM
Coo... Looks great. I just don't think I have any more space for something like that (nor the money for it, either at the moment).

Unfortunately I have a ton of work this weekend as well as a lecture to attend, so I may not get around to making pasta for a few days, however I am going to be in central London for the lecture so a trip to the John Lewis food hall is on the cards to get some flour, that's if I can't make it to Soho to an Italian deli.

Rockntractor
09-17-2010, 02:34 PM
I want one, I keep talking about it but still haven't gotten one.

Gingersnap
09-17-2010, 02:43 PM
I have two actually. They are made by Olympia.

Do yourself a favor and buy or construct some racks. ;)

jendf
09-17-2010, 02:47 PM
Neat! Be sure to post some pics of your first outing with it. :)

Rockntractor
09-17-2010, 03:32 PM
I have been looking at the extruder type pasta machines that poop it out the front like a play dough machine using different dies for each type of pasta.

bijou
09-17-2010, 03:35 PM
I have two actually. They are made by Olympia.

Do yourself a favor and buy or construct some racks. ;)

What sort of racks? I was planning on using a cake rack to set it out on.

bijou
09-17-2010, 03:36 PM
Neat! Be sure to post some pics of your first outing with it. :)

I will, unless it descends into a gluey mass of dough, then I'll maintain a discreet silence. :)

SaintLouieWoman
09-17-2010, 03:43 PM
I will, unless it descends into a gluey mass of dough, then I'll maintain a discreet silence. :)

I wonder if it makes the spaetzle noodles, like little long rectangles of dough, unlike the regular egg noodles, which are wider and flat.

Last week we bought a couple of packs of them from a German deli near us. They were so good that SR wanted them 2 nights in a row. Pat45 gave us the clue to fix them per package directions, then put them in a pan with a little butter (he probably does more butter, but I added a bit of chicken broth), with onions, fresh garlic browned in the butter. Then I put the noodles in the pan with the other ingredients. They were heavan. Can't even imagine how good they'd be with freshly made noodles.

The noodles that we had were imported from Germany.

Let us know how it goes, Bijou. I have just a little room for another seldom used gadget. :D

Gingersnap
09-17-2010, 04:01 PM
What sort of racks? I was planning on using a cake rack to set it out on.

You will need to let the pasta dry for 20 minutes or so (depending on your humidity) so that it doesn't just disintegrate in your boiling water. You might also want to dry your pasta for longer storage. They sell a lot of fancy-pants pasta drying racks but you can make your own with a few dowels or just use a rack designed for clothes drying.

Don't dismiss the joys of homemade ravioli, either. It's a bother to make but you can freeze it easily. There's just no comparison between homemade and the kind you buy.

bijou
09-17-2010, 04:05 PM
You will need to let the pasta dry for 20 minutes or so (depending on your humidity) so that it doesn't just disintegrate in your boiling water. You might also want to dry your pasta for longer storage. They sell a lot of fancy-pants pasta drying racks but you can make your own with a few dowels or just use a rack designed for clothes drying.

Don't dismiss the joys of homemade ravioli, either. It's a bother to make but you can freeze it easily. There's just no comparison between homemade and the kind you buy.

I thought I would buy the ravioli attachment if I found I was using this regularly.

Rockntractor
09-17-2010, 04:23 PM
You will need to let the pasta dry for 20 minutes or so (depending on your humidity) so that it doesn't just disintegrate in your boiling water. You might also want to dry your pasta for longer storage. They sell a lot of fancy-pants pasta drying racks but you can make your own with a few dowels or just use a rack designed for clothes drying.

Don't dismiss the joys of homemade ravioli, either. It's a bother to make but you can freeze it easily. There's just no comparison between homemade and the kind you buy.

Would a dehydrator work?

Gingersnap
09-17-2010, 04:38 PM
I thought I would buy the ravioli attachment if I found I was using this regularly.

I wouldn't bother unless you try one out for a weekend and just fall in love with it. You don't need the attachment really and it limits the shapes and sizes you will want to do. I have a couple of stamps, a ravioli wheel/cutter, and a set of dumpling presses. Those tools have seen me through a lot of ravioli manufacture.

Gingersnap
09-17-2010, 04:43 PM
Would a dehydrator work?

No, you want the noodles to hang freely. Besides, it just takes 20 minutes or so of air drying for fresh pasta. It's longer for dried pasta, of course, but you don't want any of it touching itself which would be inevitable with a dehydrator.

Now is the right time to use your dehydrator to make "sun-dried" tomatoes, though! I'm making some more this weekend. Your own taste just as good as the imported kind but cost practically nothing to make. :)