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Molon Labe
08-18-2008, 08:34 AM
Star Trek warp drive is a possibility, say scientists
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor

Two physicists have boldly gone where no reputable scientists should go and devised a new scheme to travel faster than the speed of light.

The advance could mean that Star Trek fantasies of interstellar civilisations and voyages powered by warp drive are now no longer the exclusive domain of science fiction writers.

The US Starship Enterprise from the original Star Trek series
In the long running television series created by Gene Roddenberry, the warp drive was invented by Zefram Cochrane, who began his epic project in 2053 in Bozeman, Montana.

Now Dr Gerald Cleaver, associate professor of physics at Baylor, and Richard Obousy have come up with a new twist on an existing idea to produce a warp drive that they believe can travel faster than the speed of light, without breaking the laws of physics.

In their scheme, in the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, a starship could "warp" space so that it shrinks ahead of the vessel and expands behind it.

By pushing the departure point many light years backwards while simultaneously bringing distant stars and other destinations closer, the warp drive effectively transports the starship from place to place at faster-than-light speeds.

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All this extraordinary feat requires, says the new study, is for scientists to harness a mysterious and poorly understood cosmic antigravity force, called dark energy.

Dark energy is thought responsible for speeding up the expansion rate of our universe as time moves on, just like it did after the Big Bang, when the universe expanded much faster than the speed of light for a very brief time.

This may come as a surprise since, according to relativity theory, matter cannot move through space faster than the speed of light, which is almost 300,000,000 metres per second. But that theory applies only to unwarped 'flat' space.

And there is no limit on the speed with which space itself can


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/08/15/sciwarpdrive115.xml

expat-pattaya
08-18-2008, 09:18 AM
Please. In my lifetime.
:cool:

The Night Owl
08-18-2008, 09:21 AM
Please. In my lifetime.
:cool:

Make sure you read to the end of the article Molon posted...


...

But hold the dilithium crystals: Dr Chris Van Den Broeck of Cardiff University commented: "The problem with this and previous schemes (including my own) is that part of the exotic matter would have to travel faster than the *local* speed of light (roughly speaking, it would need to go faster than the speed of light with respect to the portion of space it occupies), and that's not allowed by any established physical theory."

...

The energy to kick start the drive turned out to be equivalent to turning the entire mass of Jupiter into energy, by Einstein's famous E equals Mc squared equation, where c is the speed of light. Given the mass of Jupiter is around 2000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kilograms, that is a big number.

...

So, chances are there will be no warp drive in your lifetime or for many generations to come.

jinxmchue
08-18-2008, 09:47 AM
I once read about Prof. Stephen Hawkings' appearance on TNG (where he played poker with Data, Einstein and - I think - Newton). He got a tour of the set. When they visited the Engineering set, Hawking stopped at the warp engine and said, "I'm working on that."

Sonnabend
08-18-2008, 10:00 AM
So, chances are there will be no warp drive in your lifetime or for many generations to come.

That's what they said about Moon landings and computers...oh wait....

LogansPapa
08-18-2008, 11:07 AM
Warp drives are easy - given some yet undiscovered power source. Not running into crap in deep space isn’t so easy. And moving that crap out of the way with some sort of ‘prow’ might cause some unforeseen consequences (think astoundingly huge boat wake).

:cool:

expat-pattaya
08-18-2008, 11:17 AM
Warp drives are easy - given some yet undiscovered power source. Not running into crap in deep space isn’t so easy. And moving that crap out of the way with some sort of ‘prow’ might cause some unforeseen consequences (think astoundingly huge boat wake).

:cool:

Surfs up :D

The Night Owl
08-18-2008, 11:46 AM
That's what they said about Moon landings and computers...oh wait....

Building a warp drive is not comparable to landing a spacecraft on the Moon. Landing on the Moon was an engineering challenge. Building a warp drive is an engineering challenge and a theoretical challenge.

NonConformist
08-18-2008, 12:49 PM
Dark matter scares me!

Though Id like to see Warp achieved

LogansPapa
08-18-2008, 12:53 PM
Yeah, let famine and aggression from crack-pot dictators go on their marry ways and use more power than is contained within a gas giant in our solar system to go…….somewhere. There’s a priority.

:rolleyes:

biccat
08-18-2008, 01:50 PM
Yeah, let famine and aggression from crack-pot dictators go on their marry ways and use more power than is contained within a gas giant in our solar system to go…….somewhere. There’s a priority.
There's only so much we can do. Remember the famine in Ethiopia? We sent a lot of food over there, and not very much of it made its way to people who really needed it.

LogansPapa
08-18-2008, 02:00 PM
We sent a lot of food over there, and not very much of it made its way to people who really needed it.

Was it delivered by UN Blue helmets, or the US Marines?

biccat
08-18-2008, 02:09 PM
Was it delivered by UN Blue helmets, or the US Marines?
The Blue Helmet Brigade, of course. Marines tend to get things where they're needed most, whether bullets or food.

LogansPapa
08-18-2008, 02:13 PM
Then we should make that part of the delivery contract. Get the aid directly to those in need or get to blow the living shit out of something/someone.

:cool: