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warpig
09-25-2010, 01:53 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1315078/Race-maps-America.html

These are the maps that show the racial breakdown of America’s biggest cities.
Using information from the latest U.S. census results, the maps show the extent to which America has blended together the races in the nation’s 40 largest cities.
With one dot equalling 25 people, digital cartographer Eric Fischer then colour-coded them based on race, with whites represented by pink, blacks by blue, Hispanic by orange and Asians by green.
The resulting maps may not represent what many might expect Barack Obama’s integrated rainbow nation to look like, as many cities have clear racial dividing lines.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1315078/Race-maps-America.html#ixzz10Z5ojSB5

hampshirebrit
09-25-2010, 05:13 PM
Very interesting maps indeed.

MrsSmith
09-26-2010, 07:38 AM
I'd love to see things like this done for large cities worldwide. I'd love to see the divisions by religion, also.

How would your country look, hamps?

I don't know what my town would look like...but my immediate neighborhood is definitely purple.

:D

NJCardFan
09-26-2010, 07:47 AM
Funny how the areas that are mostly minority are the crime ridden shit holes. Who knew?:rolleyes:

hampshirebrit
09-26-2010, 09:03 AM
How would your country look, hamps?

Good question. I would expect that many of our larger cities, especially the northern ones, would be very likely to show similar demarcation lines.

SaintLouieWoman
09-26-2010, 09:28 AM
I didn't see a map of St Louis, but there are very distinct lines. East St Louis (Illinois) would be totally blue, probably not a red/pink dot there.

In St Louis City there would be very small pockets of pink/red dots, but most of the area would be blue.

In St Louis County there's a definite line. The northern area is blue; southern area is mostly pink/red;west St Louis County primarily pink/red, with pockets of blue. The orange (hispanics) would be in south city of St Louis.

The residents there know the patterns, but real estate people by law need to keep their mouths shut and not do any steering.

MrsSmith
09-26-2010, 03:00 PM
I didn't see a map of St Louis, but there are very distinct lines. East St Louis (Illinois) would be totally blue, probably not a red/pink dot there.

In St Louis City there would be very small pockets of pink/red dots, but most of the area would be blue.

In St Louis County there's a definite line. The northern area is blue; southern area is mostly pink/red;west St Louis County primarily pink/red, with pockets of blue. The orange (hispanics) would be in south city of St Louis.

The residents there know the patterns, but real estate people by law need to keep their mouths shut and not do any steering.
I looked at the Tulsa map, had already heard about the "given areas" in that town. It's enough to make me wonder if the real integrated areas are all small towns. I know every town I've lived in has been largely integrated...shoot, most are small enough that segregation isn't even possible...even if the low-income divide was across races, the low-income housing is all over town, not in one place. Big cities breed more problems than just a high percentage of Dims...

BadCat
09-26-2010, 05:51 PM
Those would be good maps to give to tourists.

bijou
09-26-2010, 05:58 PM
I'd love to see things like this done for large cities worldwide. I'd love to see the divisions by religion, also.

How would your country look, hamps?

I don't know what my town would look like...but my immediate neighborhood is definitely purple.

:D

It's a bit dated (2005) but I don't think anything's changed much. The only one I could find was for London.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/flash/0,5860,1398066,00.html

Gingersnap
09-27-2010, 11:17 AM
This isn't "segregation" - it's natural preference. You are leaving home to set up your own place but you want to stay in the area. Do you:

A. Move about an hour away from friends and family.

B. Move about 10 minutes away from friends and family?

Most people learn of places to live from friends and family and naturally, those places are by friends and family.

Where you find true ethnic diversity, you will also find fairly fixed education and income lines. Youngish. college educated, single white collar workers tend to drift together into communities that supply their interests: trendy food and fashion, upscale bars, gyms, yoga studios, and organic grocery stores. Their ethnicity is irrelevant but their careers, lifestyle and income are important driving forces.

These people have virtually nothing in common with working class people who want discount grocery stores, child care, and low cost entertainment or with older, educated retirees who want open spaces, golf, home decor stores, and none-trendy dining.

When people of various backgrounds come together it should be because they have natural common interests - not to make up a quota.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 12:02 PM
This isn't "segregation" - it's natural preference. You are leaving home to set up your own place but you want to stay in the area. Do you:

A. Move about an hour away from friends and family.

B. Move about 10 minutes away from friends and family?

Most people learn of places to live from friends and family and naturally, those places are by friends and family.

Where you find true ethnic diversity, you will also find fairly fixed education and income lines. Youngish. college educated, single white collar workers tend to drift together into communities that supply their interests: trendy food and fashion, upscale bars, gyms, yoga studios, and organic grocery stores. Their ethnicity is irrelevant but their careers, lifestyle and income are important driving forces.

These people have virtually nothing in common with working class people who want discount grocery stores, child care, and low cost entertainment or with older, educated retirees who want open spaces, golf, home decor stores, and none-trendy dining.

When people of various backgrounds come together it should be because they have natural common interests - not to make up a quota.

No it's not. Not too lonjg ago there were city ordinances that forced minorities into certain areas of the town. This was very common in most large cities and you can see the lines they choose very clearly. It takes more than 2-3 generations to change what's been steady and enforced by law for centuries

Calypso Jones
09-27-2010, 12:27 PM
post the law that says these people must live together. They CHOOSE to do it because people like to be with others like THEM. Only Christian White Americans are reviled. Not for doing it but because others do.

Gingersnap
09-27-2010, 12:38 PM
No it's not. Not too lonjg ago there were city ordinances that forced minorities into certain areas of the town. This was very common in most large cities and you can see the lines they choose very clearly. It takes more than 2-3 generations to change what's been steady and enforced by law for centuries

"Not too long ago"? What, are you a hundred years old or something? I've never lived in a place that even had laws like that historically. Not everybody lives in some decaying urban environment back East and most of us don't live in the New South - let alone the Old South.

Now, people live where they want based on work, school, recreational interests, and friends and family. That's the reality today.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 12:47 PM
"Not too long ago"? What, are you a hundred years old or something? I've never lived in a place that even had laws like that historically. Not everybody lives in some decaying urban environment back East and most of us don't live in the New South - let alone the Old South.

Now, people live where they want based on work, school, recreational interests, and friends and family. That's the reality today.

No I'm talking the decade following the "official" desegregation moves that came after the civil rights act.

My parents still vividly recall cities being racially segregated, it was well known which streets were the "border streets" and someone even wrote a best-selling book with that street in the title, talking about segregation in the latter half of this last century.

You're a smart person ginger, but I get the sense that you like to believe in something that doesn't exist: a colorblind world where all that matters is individual effort.

My grandparents and my parents were forced to live in certain areas of the city because of their ethnicity. Certain areas of the city wouldn't even let you look at homes for sale if you were a minority.

In the city I live in currently, there were city ordinances and housing codes that segregated the population along I-35. While these laws have been lifted, people stilll grow up in an area that is heavily ethnically populated by one group and they tend to stay there.

Although, my perception of this phenomenon may be different, because I live in Texas, and our history with racial issues is different than that of Northern states.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
09-27-2010, 12:57 PM
No I'm talking the decade following the "official" desegregation moves that came after the civil rights act.

My parents still vividly recall cities being racially segregated, it was well known which streets were the "border streets" and someone even wrote a best-selling book with that street in the title, talking about segregation in the latter half of this last century.

You're a smart person ginger, but I get the sense that you like to believe in something that doesn't exist: a colorblind world where all that matters is individual effort.

My grandparents and my parents were forced to live in certain areas of the city because of their ethnicity. Certain areas of the city wouldn't even let you look at homes for sale if you were a minority.

In the city I live in currently, there were city ordinances and housing codes that segregated the population along I-35. While these laws have been lifted, people stilll grow up in an area that is heavily ethnically populated by one group and they tend to stay there.

Although, my perception of this phenomenon may be different, because I live in Texas, and our history with racial issues is different than that of Northern states.

Rah rah rah America is mean and racist rah rah rah.

noonwitch
09-27-2010, 12:58 PM
"Not too long ago"? What, are you a hundred years old or something? I've never lived in a place that even had laws like that historically. Not everybody lives in some decaying urban environment back East and most of us don't live in the New South - let alone the Old South.

Now, people live where they want based on work, school, recreational interests, and friends and family. That's the reality today.


The city of Grosse Point, MI, practiced a "point system" for potential new residents well into the 1950s/60s, that made it easy to exclude blacks, jews, people with accents, etc. It was an exclusive suburb (still kind of is, at least GP Shores is), with a lot of auto execs and their families.


The map of metro Detroit is pretty much what I thought it would be.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 01:00 PM
Rah rah rah America is mean and racist rah rah rah.

- a quote from an overprivileged suburban white kid with all of the opportunities to learn that people all over the world would love to have, wasted.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 01:04 PM
I'll give you this: that's actually a fairly intelligent reply to this topic.

However, let me let you in on one of modern America's dirtiest secrets. Despite the 24/7 onslaught of propaganda from the government, the corporate machine, the news media, public schools, universities and TV sitcoms extolling the values of 'diversity', most people, whether or not they choose to admit it, want no part of it. I think this map serves as an excellent illustration of that fact. If people truly wanted more 'diversity' in their lives, they'd move to more 'diverse' areas - nothing is preventing them.

Hahaha okay I'm a poor 16 year old minority living in the same poor area that my family has lived in for generations, largly becaused they were forced to. Now, I don't have to, so perhaps I should look to move somewhere more "diverse" well let's see, I'll need a car, welp can't afford that. I'll need to pass a credit check to sign a lease in a more "diverse" environment but oh wait no that's not to great either that's okay I'll just have my parents co-sign for my like every other kid does, oh wait but they don't have a lot of money or good financial standing to co-sign.

It....it's almost as if....the system....perpetuates itself...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4o8TeqKhgY


"I can't take the smell, can't take the noise, got no money to move out I guess I got no choice!"
"I tried to get away but I couldn't get far, cuz the man with the tow-truck repossessed my car!"

CaughtintheMiddle1990
09-27-2010, 01:05 PM
- a quote from an overprivileged suburban white kid with all of the opportunities to learn that people all over the world would love to have, wasted.

Again with the class warfare, and again with the mentions of race. You're such a typical academic liberal. I can tell you have quite a bit of resentment within you for white people, it's pretty obvious from your speech. "Suburban white kid." What if I say, "urban black kid" as a disparaging term, with the same condescending tone you use toward me? Society, and people like you, would brand me a racist.
As to my opportunities--I don't feel hating my country or seeing my country as this mean, monstrous, racist place is a waste. All your education, which has seemingly left you with a form of tunnel vision where socialism in some form is the ideal, and America is this horrible evil monster, is what seems to have been wasted.
I can see both the good and the bad of America. I can see the advantages and pitfalls of Capitalism--You dismiss it out of hand. And yes, before you ask, I've explored socialism and I found it unsatisfactory.

AmPat
09-27-2010, 01:10 PM
I expected Man Fran to look rainbow patterned.:(

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 01:12 PM
Again with the class warfare, and again with the mentions of race.

OMG he mentioned it!! no fair!!!

Get over it. Class struggle is the reality of history. Race is the important in the history and reality of social relations in our country. To ignore it is to just ignore a huge chunk of reality and then be baffled as to why your white-washed version of color-blind reality doesn't seem to make sense.



You're such a typical academic liberal. I can tell you have quite a bit of resentment within you for white people, it's pretty obvious from your speech. "Suburban white kid." What if I say, "urban black kid" as a disparaging term, with the same condescending tone you use toward me? Society, and people like you, would brand me a racist.

Now why is that? Why do you think there's a difference in attitudes towards criticizing whites versus criticizing minority ethnic groups?



As to my opportunities--I don't feel hating my country or seeing my country as this mean, monstrous, racist place is a waste. All your education, which has seemingly left you with a form of tunnel vision where socialism in some form is the ideal, and America is this horrible evil monster, is what seems to have been wasted.

You don't know what I believe. You can barely parse what I try to post on this half-retarded forum. I was born poor, in the ghetto, no one in my family had finished high school or gone to college, I didn't have as many opportunities but I realized that I had a hell of a lot more than a lot of other people so I take hold of it by learning as much as I can and doing as much as I can to better myself and others.

You've been handed everything and the only intellectual work you do is a sort of masturbatory contemplation on why everyone doesn't just love and live in your fantasy bubble of reality. It's a waste of your overpriviledge, you should always feel guilty.


I can see both the good and the bad of America. I can see the advantages and pitfalls of Capitalism--You dismiss it out of hand. And yes, before you ask, I've explored socialism and I found it unsatisfactory.

hahahhaa okay buddy please elaborate on your "exploration of socialism" hahhaa. please tell me it was a youtube video lmao

CaughtintheMiddle1990
09-27-2010, 01:21 PM
OMG he mentioned it!! no fair!!!

Get over it. Class struggle is the reality of history. Race is the important in the history and reality of social relations in our country. To ignore it is to just ignore a huge chunk of reality and then be baffled as to why your white-washed version of color-blind reality doesn't seem to make sense.




Now why is that? Why do you think there's a difference in attitudes towards criticizing whites versus criticizing minority ethnic groups?




You don't know what I believe. You can barely parse what I try to post on this half-retarded forum. I was born poor, in the ghetto, no one in my family had finished high school or gone to college, I didn't have as many opportunities but I realized that I had a hell of a lot more than a lot of other people so I take hold of it by learning as much as I can and doing as much as I can to better myself and others.

You've been handed everything and the only intellectual work you do is a sort of masturbatory contemplation on why everyone doesn't just love and live in your fantasy bubble of reality. It's a waste of your overpriviledge, you should always feel guilty.



hahahhaa okay buddy please elaborate on your "exploration of socialism" hahhaa. please tell me it was a youtube video lmao

Class struggle is a natural state. One guy is rich, the other is poor. Such is life. The poor man can rise above it if he chooses. People who say there aren't opportunities are those who don't want to try. I come from people who were self made, who came from lower middle class backgrounds. They didn't cry about how unfair society was to their Italian-Irish Catholic selves. They took what life handed them and made something of it. This whining about how unfair society is just that, whining.

And yeah, race has been a sad fact of the past, but at this point I'd say minorities hold more hate for whites than whites do for minorities. There's no desire on the part of minorities to move on. Segregation was bad, slavery was horrible; both are gone, let's work together and move forward instead of dwelling divided on the 1960s.

You praise socialism any chance you get. And you were born poor in the Ghetto. Am I supposed to feel bad? Wasn't my fault or the fault of anyone I know. My parents were the first generation of their families to get a college degree and their fathers had fought in WWII and Korea and could've taken advantage of the benefits of the GI Bill to go to college themselves, but didn't and decided to live a blue collar, middle class life in New York City.

And no, I love to read and learn shit. I just don't like tearing down my country. I've read the Communist Manifesto and I've studied the history of Socialism's implementations in various countries. I've read about what it's done to Russia, to Cuba, to Venezuela, etc. Unlike many here and yourself, I don't consider Progressivism of the early-mid 20th century American variety to have been Socialist.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 01:34 PM
Class struggle is a natural state.

So why are you offended by talking about it? If it's our natural state it should be taken into account whenever we are dealing with issues of society.


One guy is rich, the other is poor. Such is life.

Bullshit money is artificial, so is wealth, so is poverty.


The poor man can rise above it if he chooses. People who say there aren't opportunities are those who don't want to try. I come from people who were self made, who came from lower middle class backgrounds. They didn't cry about how unfair society was to their Italian-Irish Catholic selves. They took what life handed them and made something of it. This whining about how unfair society is just that, whining.

Horatio Alger idolotry. Believing this today is just like people in the 50s and 60s who believed that Leave it to Beaver was an accurate picture of reality. You are mistaking images on television for reality.


And yeah, race has been a sad fact of the past, but at this point I'd say minorities hold more hate for whites than whites do for minorities. There's no desire on the part of minorities to move on. Segregation was bad, slavery was horrible; both are gone, let's work together and move forward instead of dwelling divided on the 1960s.

Please tell me more about what minorities desire.


You praise socialism any chance you get.

I don't praise alcoholics anonymous very much but if I was in a room full of alcoholics you better believe I'd be singing it's praises.


And you were born poor in the Ghetto. Am I supposed to feel bad? Wasn't my fault or the fault of anyone I know. My parents were the first generation of their families to get a college degree and their fathers had fought in WWII and Korea and could've taken advantage of the benefits of the GI Bill to go to college themselves, but didn't and decided to live a blue collar, middle class life in New York City.

Awesome. Thanks to socialist laws like the GI Bill, your ancestors had access that many other people did not have, and some were strictly prohibited from. Thanks to your parents hard work you've been able to live a comfortable easy life that's 99% cushier than 99% of all humans who ever lived. You won the Natal Lottery and were born into the right family. You should take every chance that's offered to you and make the best of it.




And no, I love to read and learn shit. I just don't like tearing down my country. I've read the Communist Manifesto and I've studied the history of Socialism's implementations in various countries.

Hahaha yes you and every other shaggy haired 14 year old sticking it to The Man.



I've read about what it's done to Russia, to Cuba, to Venezuela, etc. Unlike many here and yourself, I don't consider Progressivism of the early-mid 20th century American variety to have been Socialist.

lmao you really believe glenn beck ahhahahahhaa oh my god it's such a tragic waste but in a sad way it's still funny

CaughtintheMiddle1990
09-27-2010, 01:43 PM
OMG he mentioned it!! no fair!!!

Get over it. Class struggle is the reality of history. Race is the important in the history and reality of social relations in our country. To ignore it is to just ignore a huge chunk of reality and then be baffled as to why your white-washed version of color-blind reality doesn't seem to make sense.




Now why is that? Why do you think there's a difference in attitudes towards criticizing whites versus criticizing minority ethnic groups?




You don't know what I believe. You can barely parse what I try to post on this half-retarded forum. I was born poor, in the ghetto, no one in my family had finished high school or gone to college, I didn't have as many opportunities but I realized that I had a hell of a lot more than a lot of other people so I take hold of it by learning as much as I can and doing as much as I can to better myself and others.

You've been handed everything and the only intellectual work you do is a sort of masturbatory contemplation on why everyone doesn't just love and live in your fantasy bubble of reality. It's a waste of your overpriviledge, you should always feel guilty.



hahahhaa okay buddy please elaborate on your "exploration of socialism" hahhaa. please tell me it was a youtube video lmao


So why are you offended by talking about it? If it's our natural state it should be taken into account whenever we are dealing with issues of society.



Bullshit money is artificial, so is wealth, so is poverty.



Horatio Alger idolotry. Believing this today is just like people in the 50s and 60s who believed that Leave it to Beaver was an accurate picture of reality. You are mistaking images on television for reality.



Please tell me more about what minorities desire.



I don't praise alcoholics anonymous very much but if I was in a room full of alcoholics you better believe I'd be singing it's praises.



Awesome. Thanks to socialist laws like the GI Bill, your ancestors had access that many other people did not have, and some were strictly prohibited from. Thanks to your parents hard work you've been able to live a comfortable easy life that's 99% cushier than 99% of all humans who ever lived. You won the Natal Lottery and were born into the right family. You should take every chance that's offered to you and make the best of it.





Hahaha yes you and every other shaggy haired 14 year old sticking it to The Man.




lmao you really believe glenn beck ahhahahahhaa oh my god it's such a tragic waste but in a sad way it's still funny

You're the only one who seems to be wanting to ''stick it to the man.''
I don't have shaggy hair either. Long hair and pot isn't really my thing. I'm not a '60s duuude.
Idoltry? It's the truth. People have choices. Some have less 'genetic luck' than others, but there's opportunities for all.
But they didn't make use of what you call those "socialist programs" like the GI Bill. Again, I'm not going to feel guilt over what I wasn't responsible for. Was it bad that blacks and others were excluded from things? Yeah. But...It wasn't my fault so don't expect much sympathy or guilt.
Actually, if you even watched Glenn Beck, he derides 20th century Progressivism as being socialist. So, no I don't agree with him there.

Gingersnap
09-27-2010, 01:56 PM
Hahaha okay I'm a poor 16 year old minority living in the same poor area that my family has lived in for generations, largly becaused they were forced to. Now, I don't have to, so perhaps I should look to move somewhere more "diverse" well let's see, I'll need a car, welp can't afford that. I'll need to pass a credit check to sign a lease in a more "diverse" environment but oh wait no that's not to great either that's okay I'll just have my parents co-sign for my like every other kid does, oh wait but they don't have a lot of money or good financial standing to co-sign.

It....it's almost as if....the system....perpetuates itself...


If I'm a smart 16 teen year old, I'll ask my guidance counselor and case worker (if I have one) to help me get into college for the next 2 years. As a minority, I'll be given preferential attention at many schools as well as being eligible for many grants, scholarships, work/study opportunities, and mentoring programs. If I get my degree in an employable field, I can get an apartment with a couple of my college buddies near work. I can take public transportation to work (like so many of my urban peers). I'll be building my own credit rating and creating my own budget by that time.

It's almost....as if.....planning pays off! :rolleyes:

I don't live on a ranch and I don't do manual labor for a living. Plenty of my relatives do both. I could have done that and stayed surrounded by friends and family. I took some risks. Some paid off and some didn't. Planning and risk-taking aren't skin tone traits, they aren't even cultural traits - they are just tools.

Wei Wu Wei
09-27-2010, 02:07 PM
If I'm a smart 16 teen year old,

Imagine being average, or even, below average.

Yes if we cherry pick the few exception to the rule we can always feel good that "someone made it" even if most people do not.


I'll ask my guidance counselor and case worker (if I have one) to help me get into college for the next 2 years. As a minority, I'll be given preferential attention at many schools as well as being eligible for many grants, scholarships, work/study opportunities, and mentoring programs. If I get my degree in an employable field, I can get an apartment with a couple of my college buddies near work. I can take public transportation to work (like so many of my urban peers). I'll be building my own credit rating and creating my own budget by that time.

Just say Bootstraps.

These things are all true, I will not argue against them, because I am an example of what you are talking about. I was poor, living in a bad neighboorhood, a minority who was rather gifted, got the attention of teachers and counselors, scored super high on my SAT, got scholarships and financial aid, went to college, did well there, got a degree, got another, did some research work, made some money, worked a few separate jobs, saved enough money, and let's just say I'm doing okay for myself and looking forward to new and better career areas for this time of my life. I have the luxury to work a job I'll enjoy.


However, even though I did the whole thing that everyone loves to trumpet as proof that anyone can make it in our system, I still say to this day that your environment makes a difference. My siblings didn't do what I did, neither did most of my many many cousins. Almost no one that I knew growing up in that poor neighborhood went on to college.

If you want to strip away all context and look only at raw skills and effort, then you can make the argument you are making, but reality isn't like that. And trust me, I'd love to be able to say "oh it's all just hard work, I guess everyone else living in my old neighboorhood was just lazy and dumb, I was the only one smart and hard working!"

No, that's bullshit and I know it. Even with my poor environment I still had some benefits that others didn't, my parents still strongly emphasized education for me (not everoyne's parents did this, many of them were never allowed to go to school, it was never a possibility because of the Law, so the value of education was never instilled in their family tradition)

BadCat
09-27-2010, 04:30 PM
Even with my poor environment I still had some benefits that others didn't, my parents still strongly emphasized education for me

They must be very disappointed in how you turned out.

Articulate_Ape
09-27-2010, 06:56 PM
They must be very disappointed in how you turned out.

QFT

AmPat
09-27-2010, 07:46 PM
Bullshit money is artificial, so is wealth, so is poverty.I agree. Now give me all your artificial money and wealth.:rolleyes:

Gingersnap
09-27-2010, 08:11 PM
Imagine being average, or even, below average.


Like I don't have a boatload of shirttail relatives who couldn't make a good decision if you put a gun to their heads. I know all about average and below.

I think it's wonderful that you had some goals growing up. I did too. My parents essentially handed me the tool box of hard work, goal-setting, and education and then that was it

The entire history of human achievement has been dominated by a few people who fought for a better way and then maybe one of their kids did the same and then maybe two of the grandkids did and so on. There is no easy way to change comfortable culture.

If you are getting most of your needs met, why change? Change is difficult and alienating. You often really can't go home again. Some of my cousins are just happy as clams and fat as ticks living off the welfare/disability merry-go-round. I think their lives suck but they have friends, neighbors, and a social circle that fits their goals.

Will all their kids do that? Probably not; the young are ambitious but some will.

People change when their aspirations exceed their environments or when they can exploit their environments to meet their aspirations.

m00
09-27-2010, 09:59 PM
No, that's bullshit and I know it. Even with my poor environment I still had some benefits that others didn't, my parents still strongly emphasized education for me (not everoyne's parents did this, many of them were never allowed to go to school, it was never a possibility because of the Law, so the value of education was never instilled in their family tradition)

What religion is this?