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Gingersnap
11-01-2010, 10:55 PM
Why have Pakistan and India Evolved so Differently?

Posted by Sri Lanka Guardian India, Moorthy Muthuswamy, NuclearEnergy, Pakistan, worldview 3:30:00 PM

by Dr. Moorthy Muthuswamy

In 1947, unknowingly, a socio-religious experiment was launched: The British-ruled India was partitioned into Pakistan and India for the Muslim minorities and the majority Hindus respectively.

Back then, these two highly illiterate South Asian nations had predominantly agriculture-based economies, with Pakistan inheriting a better-developed irrigation system compared to India.[i] Leaving aside their majority religions, at birth, they shared culture, language, ethnicity and culinary habits. Yet, their evolution couldnít be any more different Ė while India has emerged to become a secular nation with a thriving and multi-faceted economy, constitutionally Islamic Pakistan has descended into an economic basket case and a fountainhead of terror.

This analysis offers the possibility of identifying the roots of Pakistanís gradual evolution since its birth, including the policy decisions taken by the government and the factors influencing them. Such an analysis could form the basis of a more robust policy response to mitigate the threat posed by a nuclear-armed Pakistan. There is yet another reason: itís due to the realization that Pakistan stands today as a microcosm of the challenges faced by Muslim communities around the globe.

The Pakistani state had the opportunity, like India, to focus on development and wealth creation. But it chose not to. Indiaís emergence is due to the investments it made in building quality higher educational institutions in the fields of engineering, technology and management in the 1950s and 60s.[ii]

During the same period, while neglecting modern education,[iii] Pakistan was busy sponsoring a myriad of homegrown jihadist groups as a means of extending its sphere of influence abroad. It is suspected of aiding some Taliban groups in order to advance its agenda in Afghanistan.[iv] It is also said to sponsor radical groups such as Lashkar-e-Taiba, implicated in the 2008 Mumbai attacks by the Indian government.[v]

A narrative of the Muslim minorities in South Asia consists of early hints that are as fascinating as they are telling of Pakistanís descend into radicalism.

When the British colonizers set up a Sanskrit college in Kolkata in 1829, Hindu leaders opposed it, demanding English medium schools instead. However, when the British announced a program in 1835 to introduce English in schools, Muslim clerics opposed the move by claiming that education imparted in English was at variance with the tenets of Islam.[vi] Hindus clearly understood that acquiring new knowledge required learning English, whereas, Muslim clerics had viewed modern education offered in the English language as abhorrent. These respective outlooks continue to shape these two communities in South Asia even after the birth of Pakistan and India. Back then, the Muslims can hardly be considered a disadvantaged community, having been the ruling class for several centuries, before the advent of the British rule in 1757.[vii]

Fascinating. Read it all.

Sri Lanka Guardian (http://www.srilankaguardian.org/2010/11/why-have-pakistan-and-india-evolved-so.html)

MountainMan
11-01-2010, 11:07 PM
The responsible growth of freedom works everytime.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
11-01-2010, 11:11 PM
Islam might have something to do with it.
Hinduism is a pretty peaceful, forward thinking (or at least, isn't so tied to a medieval legal and thought system), and Hinduis dominate India. Then you have Buddhists, who are pretty much on the same page as the Hindus except less theistic.

CueSi
11-01-2010, 11:13 PM
Islam might have something to do with it.
Hinduism is a pretty peaceful, forward thinking (or at least, isn't so tied to a medieval legal and thought system), and Hinduis dominate India. Then you have Buddhists, who are pretty much on the same page as the Hindus except less theistic.

The Caste system though... that's a major drawback to Hindu culture. :(

~QC

CaughtintheMiddle1990
11-01-2010, 11:15 PM
The Caste system though... that's a major drawback to Hindu culture. :(

~QC

Yeah but it's mostly a dead system. It's had it's day.
It wasn't also a MAJOR foundation of their religion.
And it wasn't a religion built with violence and oppression as it's foundations.

PoliCon
11-01-2010, 11:45 PM
Islam might have something to do with it.
Hinduism is a pretty peaceful, forward thinking (or at least, isn't so tied to a medieval legal and thought system), and Hinduis dominate India. Then you have Buddhists, who are pretty much on the same page as the Hindus except less theistic.

http://www.news24.com/World/News/100-Christians-killed-in-India-20081125
http://www.asianews.it/index.php?l=en&art=13658


yup. peaceful.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
11-02-2010, 02:56 AM
The Caste system though... that's a major drawback to Hindu culture. :(

~QC


http://www.news24.com/World/News/100-Christians-killed-in-India-20081125
http://www.asianews.it/index.php?l=en&art=13658


yup. peaceful.

Every religion has it's bad members and moments.
Are you really going to put Hinduism on the same level as Islam?

PoliCon
11-02-2010, 09:37 AM
Every religion has it's bad members and moments.
Are you really going to put Hinduism on the same level as Islam?

Same? no. They're a step or two below.

jediab
11-02-2010, 09:38 AM
Yep. My wife whoes family is Buddist says that even that religion has had the occasional bad member who have done horrible things in the name of Buddism.

Wei Wu Wei
11-02-2010, 09:51 AM
Aha! it's a trick question!




(evolution is a myth)

hampshirebrit
11-02-2010, 10:14 AM
Islam might have something to do with it.
Hinduism is a pretty peaceful, forward thinking (or at least, isn't so tied to a medieval legal and thought system), and Hinduis dominate India. Then you have Buddhists, who are pretty much on the same page as the Hindus except less theistic.

I'm guessing from this that you have never been to India, nor have you heard about Shiv Sena and the RSS.

And as CueSi quite rightly points out, Hinduism is very much tied to medieval thought systems through caste, especially in rural areas.

It's largely due to India's more developed democracy and the government's efforts to overcome caste restrictions and dowry debt that it's in better shape than Pakistan.

I've travelled to both countries. Both have been held back by their respective majority religions, not just Pakistan.

noonwitch
11-03-2010, 08:15 AM
I think the british influence has remained to a certain degree in India, and that may be due to the fact that India is more religiously diverse than Pakistan.


My dad visited India in 1979 as part of a Rotary businessmen's exchange. He noted that with the families he stayed with, there was a lot of admiration for and practice of british cultural ways. He stayed with the wealthy people, as there really wasn't much of a middle class in India at the time.

He said that most of the families treated their daughters pretty well, and that no one practiced suttee (something the british found horrendous). There was one family where the females of the house did not dine with the men, though, and another that lifted that rule when the americans were visiting, at their guests' request. All of the families were hindus.

All the families had their children, male and female, educated at british schools. All spoke english fluently, or were learning to do so. They took tea at 4 o'clock.

megimoo
11-03-2010, 08:36 AM
Aha! it's a trick question!




(evolution is a myth)And so are you !

Odysseus
11-03-2010, 08:51 AM
Aha! it's a trick question!
(evolution is a myth)

You realize that you were not missed...