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Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 01:10 PM
Nearly 1 in 5 Americans had mental illness in 2009

Published: Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 1:13 PM ET

CHICAGO - More than 45 million Americans, or 20 percent of U.S. adults, had some form of mental illness last year, and 11 million had a serious illness, U.S. government researchers reported on Thursday.

Young adults aged 18 to 25 had the highest level of mental illness at 30 percent, while those aged 50 and older had the lowest, with 13.7 percent, said the report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration or SAMHSA.

The rate, slightly higher than last year's 19.5 percent figure, reflected increasing depression, especially among the unemployed, SAMHSA, part of the National Institutes of Health, said.

"Too many Americans are not getting the help they need and opportunities to prevent and intervene early are being missed," Pamela Hyde, SAMHSA's administrator, said in a statement.

"The consequences for individuals, families and communities can be devastating. If left untreated mental illnesses can result in disability, substance abuse, suicides, lost productivity, and family discord."

The 2009 mental health survey hints at the impact of record unemployment rates, which last year hit a 25-year high as struggling employers slashed jobs to cope with a weak economy.

For many, lost employment meant loss of health insurance, leaving many of the nation's mentally ill unable to get treatment.

According to the survey, 6.1 million adults last year had a mental health need that went untreated, and 42.5 percent said it was because they could not afford it.

I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/40257359)

megimoo
11-19-2010, 01:28 PM
I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/40257359)

The DSM defines wild mood swings as abnormal .They has a canned definition of every human emotion and human behavior that has been predefined by Psychiatry as deviant .Some of their works:

...Deviant children grown up
...Abused to abuser: Antecedents of socially deviant behaviors
...Attainment and Adjustment in Two Geographical Areas: I--The Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorder
...Deviant eye tracking in twins discordant for psychosis: A replication
...Height, body mass index and mortality: do social factors explain the association?
...A behavior rating scale for assessing improvement in behaviorally deviant children: a preliminary investigation
...A psychiatric study of deviant eating behaviour among mentally handicapped adults.
...Sex roles and societal reactions to mental illness: The labeling of" deviant" deviance

Psychiatry is all about 'labeling' a condition and not necessarily about curing curing it ! Observing a Problem, Naming It and Fixing It Are Entirely Different Things !
http://www.sntp.net/naming.htm




Cyclothymic disorder, also known as cyclothymia, is a relatively mild form of bipolar II disorder characterized by mood swings that may appear to be almost within the normal range of emotions. These mood swings range from mild depression, or dysthymia, to mania of low intensity, or hypomania.

lacarnut
11-19-2010, 02:14 PM
I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/40257359)

I buy it if the misuse of mind altering legal and illegal drugs are included in the study.

Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 03:04 PM
It's no coincidence that rates of "mental illness" have shot up ever since family doctors got into the prescribing of mood-altering drugs for emotional issues. It's also not helpful that schools, workplaces, and the media tend to treat commonplace emotional reactions as though they had exotic significance. People just love to believe that they have some kind of ill-defined "issue" that makes them special and sets them apart from the herd.

Articulate_Ape
11-19-2010, 03:19 PM
It's no coincidence that rates of "mental illness" have shot up ever since family doctors got into the prescribing of mood-altering drugs for emotional issues. It's also not helpful that schools, workplaces, and the media tend to treat commonplace emotional reactions as though they had exotic significance. People just love to believe that they have some kind of ill-defined "issue" that makes them special and sets them apart from the herd.

Spot on.

FBIGuy
11-19-2010, 03:46 PM
Spot on.


You where the 5th person to post.

FBIGuy
11-19-2010, 03:46 PM
You where the 5th person to post.

God help me! I was the 5th poster.

Bailey
11-19-2010, 03:48 PM
Seems like a large chunk of that 1 and 5 post on du:confused::eek:

noonwitch
11-19-2010, 04:34 PM
I buy it if the misuse of mind altering legal and illegal drugs are included in the study.



Substance abuse disorders are listed in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual as psychiatric disorders. Every SA inpatient treatment program that I have ever worked with has each client seen at least for a consult with a psychiatrist.


There are a lot of things that are now considered psychiatric disorders and treated with medication that weren't considered that way 30 years ago. ADHD, for example. It used to be a diagnosis reserved for kids with really serious behavior issues in school and in the home, due to their lack of ability to focus on the task at hand. Now it's being used to diagnose kids who have a high energy level and basically need more activity in their lives. So it's really easy to do a study that finds that a large number of americans have untreated mental health conditions, when the profession has expanded their diagnostic criteria in order to make more money from and for insurance companies.

Then there are personality disorders, many of which never are diagnosed or treated. They usually don't require medication, although the people around the clients usually want them medicated because they are annoying. Especially borderlines. But most people with personality disorders generally either think that there is nothing wrong with them, and everyone else is crazy(borderlines, narcississts); or they are deeply ashamed of the things that they think separate them from others and are mortified at the concept of discussing it with someone, or taking a pill to treat it (schizotypals, ODD).

Madisonian
11-19-2010, 07:28 PM
Aren't 20% of the population self identified as liberals or progressives.
Is this number a coincidence?:rolleyes:

Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 07:42 PM
Substance abuse disorders are listed in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual as psychiatric disorders. Every SA inpatient treatment program that I have ever worked with has each client seen at least for a consult with a psychiatrist.


There are a lot of things that are now considered psychiatric disorders and treated with medication that weren't considered that way 30 years ago. ADHD, for example. It used to be a diagnosis reserved for kids with really serious behavior issues in school and in the home, due to their lack of ability to focus on the task at hand. Now it's being used to diagnose kids who have a high energy level and basically need more activity in their lives. So it's really easy to do a study that finds that a large number of americans have untreated mental health conditions, when the profession has expanded their diagnostic criteria in order to make more money from and for insurance companies.

Then there are personality disorders, many of which never are diagnosed or treated. They usually don't require medication, although the people around the clients usually want them medicated because they are annoying. Especially borderlines. But most people with personality disorders generally either think that there is nothing wrong with them, and everyone else is crazy(borderlines, narcississts); or they are deeply ashamed of the things that they think separate them from others and are mortified at the concept of discussing it with someone, or taking a pill to treat it (schizotypals, ODD).

I think a lot of people just get labeled with some mental illness diagnosis by relatively untrained people like family doctors, school officials, social workers (no offense), and various "outreach" people.

If your kid or spouse dies and you spend a year or two grieving, that's not depression; that's a dead-on normal situational reaction. If you hate school because it's boring and filled with repulsive people, that's a reasonable reaction for which no medication is needed. If someone drops dead at work or school (for any reason), feeling shocked is fine - you should feel shocked. Acting like the shock is totally disabling thanks to grief counselors is not fine.

We've redefined the more uncomfortable aspects of the human condition as diseases or conditions.

Odysseus
11-19-2010, 07:42 PM
Nearly 1 in 5 Americans had mental illness in 2009

Published: Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 1:13 PM ET

CHICAGO - More than 45 million Americans, or 20 percent of U.S. adults, had some form of mental illness last year, and 11 million had a serious illness, U.S. government researchers reported on Thursday.
And Obama's polling numbers in the latest Rasmussen show that 26% strongly approve of his presidency. I guess that the other 6% just didn't realize that they were mentally ill.


Young adults aged 18 to 25 had the highest level of mental illness at 30 percent, while those aged 50 and older had the lowest, with 13.7 percent, said the report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration or SAMHSA.
And young adults aged 18-25 are also the demographic that most strongly supports Obama. Need I say more?

Rockntractor
11-19-2010, 07:44 PM
Ocd

Bubba Dawg
11-19-2010, 07:51 PM
Ocd

OCD.

Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 07:59 PM
Ocd

I knew this was just a matter of time. :rolleyes:

While I've had this problem my entire life, I have gone to enormous lengths to ensure that it never became a problem for anybody else. Every medical doctor I have seen over the past 15 years has wanted to drug me out of this even though no research supports long-term drug management. Anti-anxiety meds only help OCD people for a short time if they are also doing cognitive-behavioral therapy. It can make us calm enough to start treatment.

Aside from that, meds are worthless. If anything, they can take the edge off just enough to make the behaviors/thoughts livable and that's a horrible way to live.

I took Inderal when I first started therapy but tapered off it by the 6 month point. You just have to keep up with the skills. I might have OCD but I'm not mentally ill. ;)

NJCardFan
11-19-2010, 08:46 PM
I'm crazier than a shit house rat.

Rockntractor
11-19-2010, 08:53 PM
I might have OCD but I'm not mentally ill. ;)
There are those 8 foot owls?:confused:

Bubba Dawg
11-19-2010, 08:53 PM
I've taken an anti-depressant for anxiety and panic disorder and been helped by it. Never had therapy, though.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy seems to make sense.

Hawkgirl
11-19-2010, 08:59 PM
Taking the edge off....isn't that what alcohol is for? :D no prescription needed.....as long as you can walk away.

I recall years ago, I had to have a drink every night when I returned from work. Just one drink, as shot of cognac, bailey's, or a beer. After about 6 weeks...I stopped altogether as I didn't want it to become a problem.


I took an anxiety drug about 2 years ago after surgery....partial hysterectomy, my mood swings were not normal, and I was a bit OCD too....I took it for 2 weeks (Lexapro), I started hallucinating...so I stopped, never filled the prescription and didnt' even finish the trial size pills my doc gave me. Amazingly my symptoms went away...2 weeks wasn't enough time to stabilize my hormones...I wonder if our symptoms are psychosomatic..and most of the time, it's just the placebo effect?


Some people truly need psych drugs to function, but I think they are over used for the rest of us.

Rockntractor
11-19-2010, 09:11 PM
I started hallucinating...so I stopped, never filled the prescription and didnt' even finish the trial size pills my doc gave me. Amazingly my symptoms went away...2 weeks wasn't enough time to stabilize my hormones...I wonder if our symptoms are psychosomatic..and most of the time, it's just the placebo effect?


Some people truly need psych drugs to function, but I think they are over used for the rest of us.
We used to take things in the early 70s with hallucinating as the goal!:confused:

Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 09:23 PM
Taking the edge off....isn't that what alcohol is for? :D no prescription needed.....as long as you can walk away.

I recall years ago, I had to have a drink every night when I returned from work. Just one drink, as shot of cognac, bailey's, or a beer. After about 6 weeks...I stopped altogether as I didn't want it to become a problem.

I took an anxiety drug about 2 years ago after surgery....partial hysterectomy, my mood swings were not normal, and I was a bit OCD too....I took it for 2 weeks (Lexapro), I started hallucinating...so I stopped, never filled the prescription and didnt' even finish the trial size pills my doc gave me. Amazingly my symptoms went away...2 weeks wasn't enough time to stabilize my hormones...I wonder if our symptoms are psychosomatic..and most of the time, it's just the placebo effect?

Some people truly need psych drugs to function, but I think they are over used for the rest of us.

Alcohol isn't that helpful for OCD (Lord knows, I've tried). Inderal helped me a lot when things really crashed for me. It's not a mood-altering drug really (it's mainly used for blood pressure and off-label for performance anxiety). It prevents a normal adrenaline reaction. If you have panic attacks (and I did), it doesn't stop them but it makes them shorter and less intense. I was able to get the help I needed with Inderal (on my dime, the insurance would only pay for talk therapy or drugs at that time).

I think the placebo effect is HUGE. I do a bunch of stuff that probably works because of that but it does work. At least with that kind of thing you aren't going to do more damage to yourself. All drugs have side-effects and most have "unintended effects" for some people.

If you are psychotic and the drugs make you functional, the risks are worth it. For garden-variety weirdness, they aren't.

Bubba Dawg
11-19-2010, 09:56 PM
Alcohol isn't that helpful for OCD (Lord knows, I've tried). Inderal helped me a lot when things really crashed for me. It's not a mood-altering drug really (it's mainly used for blood pressure and off-label for performance anxiety). It prevents a normal adrenaline reaction. If you have panic attacks (and I did), it doesn't stop them but it makes them shorter and less intense. I was able to get the help I needed with Inderal (on my dime, the insurance would only pay for talk therapy or drugs at that time).

I think the placebo effect is HUGE. I do a bunch of stuff that probably works because of that but it does work. At least with that kind of thing you aren't going to do more damage to yourself. All drugs have side-effects and most have "unintended effects" for some people.

If you are psychotic and the drugs make you functional, the risks are worth it. For garden-variety weirdness, they aren't.

I once had anxiety and panic to the point that I went without sleep for several days/nights and became psychotic. Meds helped.

I think it had to do with lack of REM sleep. Bad times.

Gingersnap
11-19-2010, 10:17 PM
I once had anxiety and panic to the point that I went without sleep for several days/nights and became psychotic. Meds helped.

I think it had to do with lack of REM sleep. Bad times.

If you still have anxiety, you might check out cognitive behavioral therapy. It sure doesn't work for everything but it works like a magic spell for some things. Depending on why you have anxiety, it might work for you. ;)

Bubba Dawg
11-19-2010, 10:25 PM
If you still have anxiety, you might check out cognitive behavioral therapy. It sure doesn't work for everything but it works like a magic spell for some things. Depending on why you have anxiety, it might work for you. ;)

Nice. Thanks. :)

Articulate_Ape
11-19-2010, 11:05 PM
Aren't 20% of the population self identified as liberals or progressives.
Is this number a coincidence?:rolleyes:

That there is one keen observation.

fettpett
11-20-2010, 09:18 AM
I had an prolonged anxiety attack a couple weeks ago, started on the 3rd, my son's birthday. 2-3 things really worked for me, one was going to the hospital cuz i kept thinking there was a problem with my heart because i was having chest pains, the other was adavant to help relax me enough to sleep (had like 1/2 of one, took it twice). The other and most important one was Cranial-sacral therapy, it helps bring the rhythm of the nervous system back into balance. extremely subtle but deep work. I would suggest it for anyone with panic/anxiety issues.

BadCat
11-20-2010, 09:57 AM
OCD.

It's "CDO"...put it in the right order, dammit.

Wei Wu Wei
11-20-2010, 10:13 AM
I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/40257359)

It is extremely common both that some people overestimate mental illness and others underestimate it.

There is a difference between normal moodiness and pathological issues. It's not always easy to tell the difference, especially from the outside, but psychologists and other clinicians are very aware of this.

Even if your assertion is correct. do you not think it is pathological when a person is willing to take powerful drugs with serious side effects instead of feeling how they naturally do?

Anti-Depressants are not fun drugs to be on, they have side effects ranging from sleep problems to sexual problems to life threatening problems. Anxiolytics are terrible drugs too, with sometimes very dangerous side effects and almost always some level of cognitive impairment. These make up the bulk of prescription medications for mental health.

One thing we need to remember is that consciousness if extremely fluid, today is a different reality than any of us, even our youngest members, grew up in. Consciousness tomorrow will be different than yesterday.

BadCat
11-20-2010, 10:20 AM
It is extremely common both that some people overestimate mental illness and others underestimate it.

There is a difference between normal moodiness and pathological issues. It's not always easy to tell the difference, especially from the outside, but psychologists and other clinicians are very aware of this.

Even if your assertion is correct. do you not think it is pathological when a person is willing to take powerful drugs with serious side effects instead of feeling how they naturally do?

Anti-Depressants are not fun drugs to be on, they have side effects ranging from sleep problems to sexual problems to life threatening problems. Anxiolytics are terrible drugs too, with sometimes very dangerous side effects and almost always some level of cognitive impairment. These make up the bulk of prescription medications for mental health.

One thing we need to remember is that consciousness if extremely fluid, today is a different reality than any of us, even our youngest members, grew up in. Consciousness tomorrow will be different than yesterday.

And one of the five chimes right in.

Wei Wu Wei
11-20-2010, 10:28 AM
I think a lot of people just get labeled with some mental illness diagnosis by relatively untrained people like family doctors, school officials, social workers (no offense), and various "outreach" people.

If your kid or spouse dies and you spend a year or two grieving, that's not depression; that's a dead-on normal situational reaction.

It wouldn't be considered depression either. Diagnostic criteria in settings where a diagnosis matters take major life events into account.

There is a broad misunderstanding of how the science of psychology is done and applied.


If you hate school because it's boring and filled with repulsive people, that's a reasonable reaction for which no medication is needed. If someone drops dead at work or school (for any reason), feeling shocked is fine - you should feel shocked. Acting like the shock is totally disabling thanks to grief counselors is not fine.

We've redefined the more uncomfortable aspects of the human condition as diseases or conditions.

No we haven't. I will admit that I do think that there are plenty of cases and situations where people are given a diagnosis that doesn't fit them or medications they don't need. There are lots of these indeed, but it's not the majority and it's not really a significant enough portion to dramatically skew how most of it is done.

I will also be the first to say that mental health treatment in America is shit.

However, I take particular offense to this sort of dismissive attitude.

If a terrible thing happens and you're feeling some mental health issues just buck up and deal with it? That sentiment is one of the most powerful contributing factor to veteran suicides. For the longest time people, even (and especially) within the military were denying that PTSD was real, or valid, or they claimed that maybe it was real but most people were just scared or trying to get out of their job or were just feeling normal things.

PTSD is to mental health what a sledge hammer to the head is to physical health. Likewise, it's easy to accept PTSD as a legitimate psychological concern because it's cause and effects are so easily noticed. However, like with physical health, some threats are not so easy to identify. Some illnesses take time, work slowly, or manifest strange symptoms.

Having studied and done some work in the field, I've always found it particularly annoying when people contribute to the societal atmosphere that prevents those with real issues from seeking the help they need.

Calypso Jones
11-20-2010, 01:52 PM
2009? You mean when the obama voters started to realize yes they did and they wished they didn't?

AmPat
11-20-2010, 03:56 PM
Young adults aged 18 to 25 had the highest level of mental illness at 30 percent,Coincidentally, this is approximately the same percentage of liberals in America. Hmmmm!!!!;)

Madisonian
11-20-2010, 08:48 PM
We used to take things in the early 70s with hallucinating as the goal!:confused:

And in your case, the hallucinations have not yet stopped.:p

CaughtintheMiddle1990
11-20-2010, 09:30 PM
2009? You mean when the obama voters started to realize yes they did and they wished they didn't?

:D
Witty, I like that.
You're probably right. I imagine the economy is a BIG factor in people feeling down. I mean during the Depression, a lot of people killed themselves just due to the despair they were in, or if they lost money in the Stock Market crash.