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PoliCon
11-29-2010, 01:17 PM
Monday, November 29 2010 22 Kislev,5771

by Gil Ronen

Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad admitted Monday that a virus has damaged computers throughout Iran and created problems in centrifuges that are involved in enrichment of uranium in several nuclear sites.
Iran's enemies “succeeded in creating problems for a limited number of our centrifuges with the software they had installed in electronic parts,” Ahmadinejad told reporters. “They did a bad thing. Fortunately our experts discovered that and today they are not able (to do that) anymore," he said.

This is the first time that Iran has officially admitted that its enemies are responsible for damaging its nuclear program by means of a computer virus.

Less than one week ago it was reported that major technical problems in Iran's nuclear program forced the shutdown of thousands of centrifuges enriching uranium at Iran's Natanz plant. Diplomats said the problems caused Iranian experts to “briefly power down” the machines they use for enrichment.

The sources said they did not have further details but suspicions focused on the Stuxnet worm, the computer virus which has recently plagued Iran's nuclear program, and is believed by many observers to have been unleashed by the US or Israel.

Experts said that the Stuxnet worm was designed to destroy centrifuges by sending them spinning out of control and then slowing them down abruptly to a near halt. There has been speculation that either the United States or Israel is responsible for the virus, which is said to be so sophisticated that no amateur or group of amateurs would have been able to devise it.

(IsraelNationalNews.com) (http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/140907?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=facebook)

megimoo
11-29-2010, 01:31 PM
Monday, November 29 2010 22 Kislev,5771

by Gil Ronen

Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad admitted Monday that a virus has damaged computers throughout Iran and created problems in centrifuges that are involved in enrichment of uranium in several nuclear sites.
Iran's enemies “succeeded in creating problems for a limited number of our centrifuges with the software they had installed in electronic parts,” Ahmadinejad told reporters. “They did a bad thing. Fortunately our experts discovered that and today they are not able (to do that) anymore," he said.

This is the first time that Iran has officially admitted that its enemies are responsible for damaging its nuclear program by means of a computer virus.

Less than one week ago it was reported that major technical problems in Iran's nuclear program forced the shutdown of thousands of centrifuges enriching uranium at Iran's Natanz plant. Diplomats said the problems caused Iranian experts to “briefly power down” the machines they use for enrichment.

The sources said they did not have further details but suspicions focused on the Stuxnet worm, the computer virus which has recently plagued Iran's nuclear program, and is believed by many observers to have been unleashed by the US or Israel.

Experts said that the Stuxnet worm was designed to destroy centrifuges by sending them spinning out of control and then slowing them down abruptly to a near halt. There has been speculation that either the United States or Israel is responsible for the virus, which is said to be so sophisticated that no amateur or group of amateurs would have been able to devise it.

(IsraelNationalNews.com) (http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/140907?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=facebook)

He's full of crap.Those computers are infected and even if they reload all of the software the embedded trojans will survive to spawn more run time viruses .The people who write this stuff are experts at writing 'tight code' and hiding it in the bios core .

PoliCon
11-29-2010, 01:34 PM
my question is did we do it or did Israel? I'm betting Israel myself. . . .

Bailey
11-29-2010, 01:36 PM
He's full of crap.Those computers are infected and even if they reload all of the software the embedded trojans will survive to spawn more run time viruses .The people who write this stuff are experts at writing 'tight code' and hiding it in the bios core .

I haven't read much on this subject but who do you think planted it?

megimoo
11-29-2010, 01:54 PM
my question is did we do it or did Israel? I'm betting Israel myself. . . .
I Tend to agree with you.Those Israeli's have the software talent and the reasons to screw up their computers .The Iranians will try and fail to remove the viruses and finally try to run the systems manually.

Madisonian
11-29-2010, 07:00 PM
The Stuxnet worm is not a computer virus in the normal sense. It is a virus that specifically target Siemens PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) systems and is typically transmitted via an infected USB memory stick which is a common protocol for archiving and retrieval of PLC code.

The worm is self deleting from the infection device after a specific number of transmissions. This has a broader impact than just Iranian nuclear facilities as it can be deployed on any Siemens PLC based system, which includes a large portion of US and foreign manufacturing.

It allows access to the PLC code by a remote server where small changes can be made that can have catastrophic results on the controlled process. Even a change to control timer of 5 milliseconds could create machine crashes, CNC machining errors, etc.

fettpett
11-29-2010, 08:42 PM
I think it's funny that they don't think that "armature" hackers couldn't design the virus. Who the hell do they think came up and makes most virus'? Hell most of the guys that work for any government are former hackers.

Sonnabend
11-30-2010, 07:01 AM
More possible is this was internal sabotage. There is certainly enough dissent to make this a prime target..and the people, as opposed to President Nutjob, are well aware of what the "government" is doing..and my guess is that maybe this is their own "fifth column" at work.

It's feasible..and as possible as any other theory. Things being what they are, we will never know either way.

swirling_vortex
11-30-2010, 09:25 AM
"I told you we shouldn't have upgraded our systems to Windows ME." --Ahmadinejad

noonwitch
11-30-2010, 10:46 AM
More possible is this was internal sabotage. There is certainly enough dissent to make this a prime target..and the people, as opposed to President Nutjob, are well aware of what the "government" is doing..and my guess is that maybe this is their own "fifth column" at work.

It's feasible..and as possible as any other theory. Things being what they are, we will never know either way.


Maybe they are getting outside assistance from western intelligence agencies. I would love to see the Iranian people take their country back from the crazies.

Odysseus
11-30-2010, 03:23 PM
The Stuxnet worm is not a computer virus in the normal sense. It is a virus that specifically target Siemens PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) systems and is typically transmitted via an infected USB memory stick which is a common protocol for archiving and retrieval of PLC code.

The worm is self deleting from the infection device after a specific number of transmissions. This has a broader impact than just Iranian nuclear facilities as it can be deployed on any Siemens PLC based system, which includes a large portion of US and foreign manufacturing.

It allows access to the PLC code by a remote server where small changes can be made that can have catastrophic results on the controlled process. Even a change to control timer of 5 milliseconds could create machine crashes, CNC machining errors, etc.
Siemens PLC systems are a very narrow target. It's possible that a current or former Siemens employee was the culprit, as such a person would have the means to create the worm, but it would take someone with access to the actual hardware to transmit it via USB stick. That tells me that it was either a current employee of Siemens who worked on the systems, or a mole in the Iranian nuclear program. If it's the former, then Iran is hosed, as this could be in all of their systems.

"I told you we shouldn't have upgraded our systems to Windows ME." --Ahmadinejad
I think that going from any OS to Windows ME constitutes a downgrade.

fettpett
11-30-2010, 03:44 PM
"I was told Windows ME was the best there was!!!" --Ahmadinejad

there...fixed it for you :D