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View Full Version : Who is your favorite Founder?



CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-13-2010, 05:48 AM
For me, I would have to say overwhelmingly Ben Franklin. Sure, he wasn't a President or anything, but he was a genius. He was inventive, with an inquisitive, questioning mind; He was very forward thinking, supporting outlawing slavery long before it became a truly national issue; An inventor and trailblazer; A thinker. I admire him greatly.

I'd have to put Washington second, as both a great military leader and a great President who shouldered a lot of responsibility and had the incredible pressure of being the FIRST President--The man who would set the tone most others would try to follow. It's hard to top the first guy at anything. Also, I admire his humility, the fact that he wasn't powerhungry; He didn't seek his position for power's sake, in fact, he would've been happier retiring to Mount Vernon but came into the arena for the sake of the country--A quality I think is lacking in many a politician today. Washington was a true servant of the public. Let's be frank, had Washington wanted, he could've become an American Octavian: A king in all but name who fooled the public with the illusion of a Republic. I'm sure many of the public, who were grateful to him, would've actually accepted that even then. I also love the fact that he was anti-parties--I actually kind of feel the same way. I think our parties divide us and put us into factions, and I'd love if a candidate could simply run on his/her beliefs, record and policies without cowtowing to a party line or being indebted to any party. I think parties have turned politics from a serious, important facet of our society into--for many, not for all--into a bloodsport, with people on the various sides cheering their teams.

After Washington for me comes Jefferson, who beyond being a great statesmen was, like Franklin, a great mind.

noonwitch
12-13-2010, 11:46 AM
John Adams. He respected his wife as an equal and never owned slaves.

NJCardFan
12-13-2010, 11:55 AM
Thomas Paine and Ben Franklin.

linda22003
12-13-2010, 11:56 AM
Franklin, then Jefferson. Fine minds, good diplomats, and popular with the girls.

Benjamin Franklin, Advice to a Young Man on the Choice of a Mistress (1745). (http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/bdorsey1/41docs/51-fra.html)

djones520
12-13-2010, 04:26 PM
John Adams. He respected his wife as an equal and never owned slaves.

He'd be my pick as well.

PoliCon
12-13-2010, 04:42 PM
One is never enough when it comes to men of greatness so I'll give my top three: George Washington - Patrick Henry - John Witherspoon.

megimoo
12-13-2010, 04:58 PM
For me, I would have to say overwhelmingly Ben Franklin. Sure, he wasn't a President or anything, but he was a genius. He was inventive, with an inquisitive, questioning mind; He was very forward thinking, supporting outlawing slavery long before it became a truly national issue; An inventor and trailblazer; A thinker. I admire him greatly.

I'd have to put Washington second, as both a great military leader and a great President who shouldered a lot of responsibility and had the incredible pressure of being the FIRST President--The man who would set the tone most others would try to follow. It's hard to top the first guy at anything. Also, I admire his humility, the fact that he wasn't powerhungry; He didn't seek his position for power's sake, in fact, he would've been happier retiring to Mount Vernon but came into the arena for the sake of the country--A quality I think is lacking in many a politician today. Washington was a true servant of the public. Let's be frank, had Washington wanted, he could've become an American Octavian: A king in all but name who fooled the public with the illusion of a Republic. I'm sure many of the public, who were grateful to him, would've actually accepted that even then. I also love the fact that he was anti-parties--I actually kind of feel the same way. I think our parties divide us and put us into factions, and I'd love if a candidate could simply run on his/her beliefs, record and policies without cowtowing to a party line or being indebted to any party. I think parties have turned politics from a serious, important facet of our society into--for many, not for all--into a bloodsport, with people on the various sides cheering their teams.

After Washington for me comes Jefferson, who beyond being a great statesmen was, like Franklin, a great mind.I agree.Washington,Jefferson then Franklin.Adams was second rate compared to Jefferson !

m00
12-13-2010, 10:07 PM
Jefferson.

malloc
12-14-2010, 01:59 AM
John Adams. He respected his wife as an equal and never owned slaves.

Thirded.

I can't really say I have a favorite, but I do hold Adams and Jefferson in very high regard among that renown circle of individuals.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-14-2010, 02:09 AM
I know he was old by the time the Constitution was written and ratified, but I do wonder how Franklin would have done as President and if he could've been elected.

FBIGuy
12-14-2010, 08:36 AM
Aaron Burr

noonwitch
12-14-2010, 08:58 AM
Aaron Burr



He will always be remembered for his marksmanship, though.

Madisonian
12-14-2010, 10:03 AM
He will always be remembered for his marksmanship, though.

Probably had Hamilton rethinking that whole 2nd amendment thingy and the right to bear arms.:D

PoliCon
12-14-2010, 10:04 AM
I know he was old by the time the Constitution was written and ratified, but I do wonder how Franklin would have done as President and if he could've been elected.

He'd prolly have been a lot like Bill Clinton. Franklin was a horndog.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-14-2010, 10:10 AM
He'd prolly have been a lot like Bill Clinton. Franklin was a horndog.

Doesn't disqualify someone from office for me, personally. As long as they aren't molesting kids, they can put their prick wherever they want.

megimoo
12-14-2010, 10:14 AM
Aaron BurrZazu Pitts :rolleyes:

PoliCon
12-14-2010, 11:07 AM
Doesn't disqualify someone from office for me, personally. As long as they aren't molesting kids, they can put their prick wherever they want.

oh right because sex never figured into how Clinton governed at all. :rolleyes:

CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-14-2010, 12:20 PM
oh right because sex never figured into how Clinton governed at all. :rolleyes:

A BJ is a BJ.
They're not that special

PoliCon
12-14-2010, 12:30 PM
A BJ is a BJ.
They're not that special

And you think **A** BJ is all there ever was with Clinton? :rolleyes:

CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-14-2010, 12:34 PM
And you think **A** BJ is all there ever was with Clinton? :rolleyes:

It doesn't really matter. What the man does with his personal life should be his business.
You'll disagree, but whatever. Agree to disagree.

PoliCon
12-14-2010, 03:16 PM
It doesn't really matter. What the man does with his personal life should be his business.
You'll disagree, but whatever. Agree to disagree.

When you use your job to do it - when you do it on the job - it's not your personal life.

CaughtintheMiddle1990
12-14-2010, 03:26 PM
When you use your job to do it - when you do it on the job - it's not your personal life.

The Presidency is a 24/7 job, so I guess the President shouldn't have sex for 4-8 years?
I don't believe a person's sex life should disbar them from being able to serve as President. The matter in which this whole Clinton issue came up was me mentioning a theoretical Franklin presidency--So I'm guessing you think, even if he had been young enough, he shouldn't have been allowed to be President?

FBIGuy
12-14-2010, 03:42 PM
Zazu Pitts :rolleyes:

I guess I shouldn't expect you to know who Aaron Burr was unless World Net Daily wrote about him :rolleyes: