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View Full Version : Christmas Food: Best and Worst.



Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 07:56 PM
What is the best thing you usually eat on Christmas? What is the worst thing you expect to confront?

The best thing for me is something called Jansson's Frestelse (Jansson's Temptation). This involves potatoes, fish, onions, and cream. It's hard to describe but excellent to eat. We Americanize it with finely diced and parboiled green and red peppers.

The worst thing is eggnog. For some reason, I am just not a fan unless an alarming amount of alcohol has been added. I like eggs, milk, spices, etc. but not eggnog.

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 08:07 PM
The worst thing is eggnog. For some reason, I am just not a fan unless an alarming amount of alcohol has been added. I like eggs, milk, spices, etc. but not eggnog.

It is like drinking mayonnaise!

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:12 PM
It is like drinking mayonnaise!

You have obviously tried both.

Constitutionally Speaking
12-23-2010, 08:15 PM
Best? Hands down my mother's dressing. No one else's has come close.


Worst?? My mother's sister's dressing. Saltier than hell - and soupy.

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 08:17 PM
You have obviously tried both.

Very similar ingredients.

Novaheart
12-23-2010, 08:17 PM
When I was a kid I liked eggnog, but now I won't drink it. I will, however, put it on Cheerios New Years Day.

The best thing is the surprise. I have a neighbor who sneaks over on Christmas morning and puts a bag of goodies on my doorknob. Usually it's cookies that are burnt a little and crispy which is the way I like them. I can't make my own cookies, because they burn my mouth.

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:18 PM
Best? Hands down my mother's dressing. No one else's has come close.


Worst?? My mother's sister's dressing. Saltier than hell - and soupy.

What do they wear?

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:19 PM
Very similar ingredients.

Have some pudding, Rock.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_mv60VL07p2s/TCapqipuONI/AAAAAAAAC4s/PdSk-TCqNUg/s1600/Mayo.Cover.jpg

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 08:20 PM
You have obviously tried both.

Like we haven't. However college is over. :p

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:27 PM
I get to roast a turkey properly this weekend. I am obligated to be subjected to the abomination my MIL creates at Thanksgiving in her nefarious kitchen. Did you ever see the turkey scene on National Lapoon's Christmas Vacation? That bird looked moist and tasty compared to the dessicated mummy we get at the pilgrim feast.

I can roast a turkey. Oh yes. And CS while you are watching your kin women dress I'll be making stuffing you'd kill for. :p

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 08:30 PM
Nothing is worse than a disappointing turkey.

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:32 PM
Worst is obviously fruitcake. If you find a hair in your fruitcake, you found the best part.

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:33 PM
Nothing is worse than a disappointing turkey.

There have been wars fought over it. How do you think the country of Turkey came about?

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 08:33 PM
Worst is obviously fruitcake. If you find a hair in your fruitcake, you found the best part.

I like fruit cake!:mad:

Articulate_Ape
12-23-2010, 08:36 PM
I like fruit cake!:mad:

So YOU'RE the one! :mad:

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 09:37 PM
Worst is obviously fruitcake. If you find a hair in your fruitcake, you found the best part.

I make killer fruit cakes. I soak them in bourbon for a month. I also like to make white fruit cakes. These are very tender and festive.

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 09:39 PM
I make killer fruit cakes. I soak them in bourbon for a month. I also like to make white fruit cakes. These are very tender and festive.

Good fruit cake is a delicacy!:)

PoliCon
12-23-2010, 10:11 PM
Best? PUMPKIN ROLL!! :cool:

Worst? Candied sweet potatos. How anyone eats them is beyond me.

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 10:20 PM
Nothing is worse than a disappointing turkey.

They are not the smartest animals in the world, maybe you are expecting too much from your turkey!

Novaheart
12-23-2010, 10:20 PM
I get to roast a turkey properly this weekend. I am obligated to be subjected to the abomination my MIL creates at Thanksgiving in her nefarious kitchen. Did you ever see the turkey scene on National Lapoon's Christmas Vacation? That bird looked moist and tasty compared to the dessicated mummy we get at the pilgrim feast.

I can roast a turkey. Oh yes. And CS while you are watching your kin women dress I'll be making stuffing you'd kill for. :p


My mom thinks the turkey has to be "done done". That means that the leg falls off.

Rockntractor
12-23-2010, 10:23 PM
My mom thinks the turkey has to be "done done". That means that the leg falls off.
Actually that is kind of the way I like them, maybe not quite that done but close.

Phillygirl
12-23-2010, 10:24 PM
My mom thinks the turkey has to be "done done". That means that the leg falls off.

My mother as well. Whatever the recommended cooking time is, she adds another 3-4 hours. And then she marvels and clucks about how the meat is "just falling right off the bone". :rolleyes: Thank god my sister took over Thanksgiving a few years ago.

The good thing about my mom's turkey was that the dryness was overcome by the oil slick she called gravy.

PoliCon
12-23-2010, 10:27 PM
You have not experience horror until you've had microwaved turkey served to you. That was the last time my aunt was allowed to host ANYTHING.

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 10:57 PM
My mom thinks the turkey has to be "done done". That means that the leg falls off.

It depends on how they are done. Indoors, I cook mine in a huge clay pot and meat is succulent but it's literally falling off the bones. Outdoors, I use the smoker and get the same results.

Oven roasting a turkey is dicey. If the leg is falling apart, the breast is usally too dry.

PoliCon
12-23-2010, 11:08 PM
It depends on how they are done. Indoors, I cook mine in a huge clay pot and meat is succulent but it's literally falling off the bones. Outdoors, I use the smoker and get the same results.

Oven roasting a turkey is dicey. If the leg is falling apart, the breast is usally too dry.

Not if you cook it on the breast.

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 11:21 PM
Not if you cook it on the breast.

Meh. I can't be bothered with all that flipping or basting. I love clay pot cooking and I'll never go back. ;)

PoliCon
12-23-2010, 11:22 PM
Meh. I can't be bothered with all that flipping or basting. I love clay pot cooking and I'll never go back. ;)

flipping? What for? :confused:

Gingersnap
12-23-2010, 11:32 PM
flipping? What for? :confused:

Most people who cook turkey breast down flip it for a half an hour at the end to brown the skin and dry it.

PoliCon
12-23-2010, 11:33 PM
Most people who cook turkey breast down flip it for a half an hour at the end to brown the skin and dry it.

meh. I peal it off.

gator
12-24-2010, 09:28 AM
My mother as well. Whatever the recommended cooking time is, she adds another 3-4 hours. And then she marvels and clucks about how the meat is "just falling right off the bone". :rolleyes: Thank god my sister took over Thanksgiving a few years ago.

The good thing about my mom's turkey was that the dryness was overcome by the oil slick she called gravy.


The key to having tender and juicy turkey is cooking to an internal temp of about 165. It really starts drying out at 180. At 190 and above it starts to transition into thick cardboard.

linda22003
12-24-2010, 09:48 AM
Our Christmas tradition is the Silver Palate's recipe for seafood lasagne. Very red and green and festive.

Phillygirl
12-24-2010, 10:28 AM
The key to having tender and juicy turkey is cooking to an internal temp of about 165. It really starts drying out at 180. At 190 and above it starts to transition into thick cardboard.

I've never cooked a turkey. I figure my mother's genes may be strong in me, so why tempt fate. When it's my turn to have Christmas I go with something I can't screw up...filet mignon and lobster tail.

Wei Wu Wei
12-24-2010, 11:46 AM
Tamales :)

obx
12-24-2010, 11:58 AM
Deviled eggs made with diced watermellon rind pickle.

m00
12-24-2010, 04:56 PM
The key to having tender and juicy turkey is cooking to an internal temp of about 165. It really starts drying out at 180. At 190 and above it starts to transition into thick cardboard.

I thought the secret was dipping it into a fryer. :D