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Rockntractor
01-01-2011, 03:14 PM
By Terrine Friday

TORONTO | Fri Dec 31, 2010 2:33pm EST

(Reuters) - After nearly two decades of hearing "don't ask, don't tell," gay U.S. military men and women are now hearing, "do ask, do tell," and even, "find a friend" from a new social network website, Out Military.

Launched just over a week ago at outmilitary.com, the site comes on the heels of President Barack Obama signing a new law repealing the so-called "don't ask, don't tell" rule, established in 1993, that prevented gay men and lesbians from openly serving in the armed forces.

To date, Out Military -- a sort of Facebook for gay and lesbian military men and women -- has only 53 members, but its backers think that will change in the months ahead as the law's repeal takes effect.

Currently, the U.S. military is drafting rules to implement the new policy, and a specific date for implementation has not been set. Even so, some members say they aren't waiting and do not fear the possibility of losing their military job.

"It gives people a social platform to communicate," Kristin Orta, a private first-class serving with the Florida National Guard, said about the site, which she joined last week after seeing an ad on Facebook.

Orta, who enlisted in August, said joining the military during the U.S. congressional debate on repeal of "don't ask, don't tell," was a coincidence. She called the repeal a step in the right direction of allowing members to serve openly.

Another Out Military member, Vietnam veteran Bill Royal, claimed he was the victim of sexual abuse during his time in the military and said he hoped the site would help others suffering the same experience.

"I joined, more than anything, so that I could maybe help someone else," explained Royal.

Out Military creator and web designer John McKinnon said he built the site to support others who may be looking for friends or for a network of gay and lesbian service members and supporters.

"I think a social networking site specifically for that niche of gay and lesbian service members is a natural fit," McKinnon said.

Based in Bangor, Maine, McKinnon had been following the "don't ask, don't tell" debate since former President Bill Clinton created the policy. He dreamed up the social networking website when the debate was resurrected in recent months.

He is, of course, encouraging people to join, but while some military members like Orta do not fear being outed, McKinnon discourages posting revealing information before the repeal comes into effect.

"(The site) might be just a little bit early, but it's not too early to join," he said.
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6BU28H20101231

Gingersnap
01-01-2011, 04:02 PM
Don't military people have enough career-ending social networking opportunities already? :confused:

CueSi
01-01-2011, 11:40 PM
I notice there's no black military social meet boards or a latino or asian military social meet board... really, guys? REALLY? You want to integrate and ya'll started your own club house and the ink isn't even dry?

I quit you guys. I really do. It's official; I have buyers remorse over DADT's repeal. That doesn't alter any of my other feelings and it doesn't prove anyone right about anything. I do want gay people to be able to live full lives with dignity, but this is not the way to do it.

Collectivist motherfuckers. That uniform should mean more than who you fuck. I thought that's what you wanted.

~QC

PoliCon
01-01-2011, 11:51 PM
Collectivist motherfuckers. That uniform should mean more than who you fuck. I thought that's what you wanted.

~QC Sadly, you thought wrong. This has always been about a greater agenda.

Kay
01-02-2011, 12:21 AM
I notice there's no black military social meet boards or a latino or asian military social meet board... really, guys? REALLY? You want to integrate and ya'll started your own club house and the ink isn't even dry?.....
Collectivist motherfuckers. That uniform should mean more than who you fuck. I thought that's what you wanted.

~QC

Well said CueSi.

Novaheart
01-02-2011, 01:29 AM
Collectivist motherfuckers. That uniform should mean more than who you fuck. I thought that's what you wanted.

~QC

There is nothing wrong with having a gay affinity group. Here are a few others in and out of uniform, I'm sure there are more. And of course the grandaddy of them all would be the Old Boy Network, and we all know whose affinity group that is.

The National Association of
Black Military Women

The National Museum of American
Jewish Military History


Hispanic Military Wives

Asian-American Officers Group Launched
Week of July 21, 2008
Four officers established the Naval Officer Mentorship Association (NOMA) for officers with Asian or Filipino ancestry.

National Native American Veterans Association

CueSi
01-02-2011, 03:52 AM
There is nothing wrong with having a gay affinity group. Here are a few others in and out of uniform, I'm sure there are more. And of course the grandaddy of them all would be the Old Boy Network, and we all know whose affinity group that is.

The National Association of
Black Military Women

The National Museum of American
Jewish Military History


Hispanic Military Wives

Asian-American Officers Group Launched
Week of July 21, 2008
Four officers established the Naval Officer Mentorship Association (NOMA) for officers with Asian or Filipino ancestry.

National Native American Veterans Association

Most of the Black or Latino soldiers I have encountered never really had or needed one to have a full career, Nova. Maybe informal friendships, but to immediately start a group before the full prohibition is lifted just sends the wrong message of priorities as to what is important to these soldiers. I probably wouldn't have joined any of those groups if I had been in either.

~QC

djones520
01-02-2011, 05:50 AM
Most of the Black or Latino soldiers I have encountered never really had or needed one to have a full career, Nova. Maybe informal friendships, but to immediately start a group before the full prohibition is lifted just sends the wrong message of priorities as to what is important to these soldiers. I probably wouldn't have joined any of those groups if I had been in either.

~QC

But where is the proof that most homosexual service members need one, or will even be partaking in this website? 53 members isn't exactly an astounding number. This forums active posters trump that easily, and we're a pretty small one.

PoliCon
01-02-2011, 10:27 AM
we're a pretty small one.
:mad:Is that some sort of fucking short joke??? :mad:



;):D

Wei Wu Wei
01-02-2011, 01:00 PM
Most of the Black or Latino soldiers I have encountered never really had or needed one to have a full career, Nova. Maybe informal friendships, but to immediately start a group before the full prohibition is lifted just sends the wrong message of priorities as to what is important to these soldiers. I probably wouldn't have joined any of those groups if I had been in either.

~QC

"sends the wrong message"?

To whom? maybe they're just trying to do what they want to do and they dont give a shit what message an anonymous third party receives from it.

this is some Megyn Kelly level argument here, something matters because "of the message it sends" (which of course, she means herself as the recipient of this message because she takes it upon herself to receive and interpret it)

People have their own priorities and their own ideas and their own values and they're living their own lives. Why does it matter if some outside person looks at what they do and takesa it upon themselves to interpret "the message" and care about what they are doing?

There's a certain level of narcissism here in assuming that what people have to do should be regulated by how you might interpret it, or even worse, to assume that strangers care about what you do or think.

Novaheart
01-02-2011, 01:36 PM
Most of the Black or Latino soldiers I have encountered never really had or needed one to have a full career, Nova. Maybe informal friendships, but to immediately start a group before the full prohibition is lifted just sends the wrong message of priorities as to what is important to these soldiers. I probably wouldn't have joined any of those groups if I had been in either.

~QC

The point is that there isn't anything unusual about someone starting an affinity group.

Moreover, given the hostility to gay service members, it's hardly surprising that some intend to network to keep in touch with each other in the common bond that hostility has and continues to foment.

I realize that we only have most of these people on their word that they are who they say they are, but our internet chat buddies and their friends who are hostile to gay people having equal rights and opportunities were not too long ago saying that courts shouldn't be the ones to decide this policy, that Congress and Congress alone should decide this. Well, Congress has decided this, and now they are saying it should be put to a popular vote, but only in the discriminatory institution. Enough.

Surely you are aware that there are blogs and chat boards in which military personnel who are hostile to other service members gather, so why would you find it somehow unacceptable or wussified that some gay people are trying to start an affinity group? If you think that black service members didn't network and communicate with each other and with watchdogs outside the military in the early days of integration I think you would be much mistaken. Some people do not give up privilege and share power easily, especially when the basis for their self perception of superiority is in jeopardy of being exposed for the bullshit that it is.

PoliCon
01-02-2011, 01:38 PM
The point is that there isn't anything unusual about someone starting an affinity group. True. And it's only a problem when it's straight white males doing it.

CueSi
01-02-2011, 08:07 PM
The point is that there isn't anything unusual about someone starting an affinity group.

Moreover, given the hostility to gay service members, it's hardly surprising that some intend to network to keep in touch with each other in the common bond that hostility has and continues to foment.


I had a back and forth with my cousin over facebook. He's ex-Army. Wasn't for repeal, but framed the affinity group idea as no different than the bible study group he joined and socialized with when he was in Germany. I'll grant him that.

For me, it does make me nervous because I don't trust the activist wing from keeping their fingers out of it. I am hoping the hostility will abate on its own w/o too much drama.

I'm being too optimistic, aren't I?

~QC