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View Full Version : Kiss your 100-watt lightbulb goodbye



Rockntractor
01-02-2011, 10:06 PM
By Tracy Seipel

tseipel@mercurynews.com
Posted: 01/01/2011 06:16:27 PM PST
Updated: 01/01/2011 10:02:47 PM PST


Californians can start saying goodbye to traditional 100-watt incandescent light bulbs now that the state has become the first in the country to require a new standard for the screw-base bulbs.

Experts say the new rules, which took effect New Year's Day, will save residents money and energy. California is already the nation's leader in energy-efficiency standards.

As of Saturday, what used to be a 100-watt light bulb manufactured and sold in California will have to use 72 watts or less. The 72-watt replacement bulb, also called an energy-saving halogen light, will provide the same amount of light, called lumens, for lower energy cost.

Similar new standards for traditional 75-watt, 60-watt and 40-watt incandescent bulbs will go into effect in California over the next few years, with wattages reduced to 53, 43 and 29 respectively.

The new rule does not ban incandescent light bulbs; it just requires those bulbs to be 25 to 30 percent more efficient. And it only affects incandescent light bulbs manufactured in 2011 or later, not those already in use or on store shelves.

The new lights are comparably priced to the regular incandescent lights. A two-bulb package of 100-watt incandescent bulbs is about $4.32 at Lowe's, while a four-bulb package of new 72-watt halogen bulbs is $8.66, or $4.33 for two. By contrast, a two-bulb package of energy-saving compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) is $11.28.

"The 72-watt bulb is improving


Edison's original idea,'' said Adam Gottlieb, a spokesman for the California Energy Commission.


"Consumers will still have the amount of light they need for the task at hand,'' said Gottlieb. "But they'll see lower electricity bills.''

Noah Horowitz, a senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council, called the new regulation "a great thing for consumers." He played a key role in the development and passage of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, upon which the new regulation is based.

"The 125-year-old incandescent light bulb is far and away the least efficient product in our homes, because 90 percent of the electricity is wasted as heat,'' Horowitz said.

The new standard, passed in 2007 by Congress and signed by President George W. Bush, becomes effective nationwide on Jan. 1, 2012. But California and Nevada, which already had energy-efficiency standards in place for lighting products, were able to adopt the law earlier. Gottlieb said Nevada legislators could have voted to do so before Dec. 31, 2008, but they let the deadline expire.
Mo>http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_16989501?nclick_check=1

SaintLouieWoman
01-03-2011, 08:52 AM
We bought a new light fixture that SR installed. We noticed the light flickering. We had one of those stupid energy saving bulbs in there. We tried a new bulb, still flickered. Then we used one of those good old-fashioned 100 watt bulbs. No flicker.

I'm going to run out and stock up on the old bulbs before the government totally controls that aspect of our lives. :rolleyes:

Gingersnap
01-03-2011, 10:39 AM
I'm going to run out and stock up on the old bulbs before the government totally controls that aspect of our lives. :rolleyes:

We already have enough incandescent bulbs to last until LED technology comes down in price and up in brightness. :)

Odysseus
01-03-2011, 11:32 AM
We bought a new light fixture that SR installed. We noticed the light flickering. We had one of those stupid energy saving bulbs in there. We tried a new bulb, still flickered. Then we used one of those good old-fashioned 100 watt bulbs. No flicker.

I'm going to run out and stock up on the old bulbs before the government totally controls that aspect of our lives. :rolleyes:

This reminds me of a story about the USSR. It seems that there was a lot of traffic in used, burnt-out bulbs. There was a shortage of working bulbs, of course, and the state would only replace them in the workplace, so people would buy the dead bulbs, replace the working ones in their offices with them, and take those home for private use.

linda22003
01-03-2011, 12:36 PM
We've been stocking up on these for a looooong time.
Don't tell anyone, but we still have 5-gallon flush toilets, too.

Novaheart
01-03-2011, 01:10 PM
The new lights are comparably priced to the regular incandescent lights. A two-bulb package of 100-watt incandescent bulbs is about $4.32 at Lowe's, while a four-bulb package of new 72-watt halogen bulbs is $8.66, or $4.33 for two. By contrast, a two-bulb package of energy-saving compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) is $11.28.


You have to love Lowes. Not only is everything in Spanish, but they charge $4.32 for two 100w bulbs when Walmart has four-packs for 99.

Oh, and let's give a big old "Good job!" to California. I'm guessing that you won't be able to find any light bulbs in six bordering states and northern Mexico after all the old folks run out and load up the trunk with a lifetime supply.

Yeah, yeah, I know, it's the same amount of light. These damned hippies don't really want us to sit in our studio apartments in the dark singing kumbaya, smoking pot, and eating seaweed while weaving bamboo cloth shirts and listening to old Judy Collins records on a wind up Victrola.

Ranger Rick
01-03-2011, 04:44 PM
I would just buy a 150 watt bulb.