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txradioguy
01-17-2011, 09:48 AM
Former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier returned Sunday to Haiti nearly 25 years after a popular uprising against his brutal dictatorship forced him into exile, a surprising and perplexing move that comes as his country struggles with a political crisis and the stalled effort to recover from last year's earthquake.

Duvalier, part of a father-and-son dynasty that presided over one of the darkest chapters in Haitian history, arrived on an Air France jet in a jacket and tie to hugs from supporters at the Port-au-Prince airport. He was calm as he was led into the immigration office. He left the airport without making a statement to journalists, waving to a crowd of more than 200 supporters as he got into an SUV.

"He is happy to be back in this country, back in his home," said Mona Beruaveau, a candidate for Senate in a Duvalierist party who spoke to the former dictator inside the immigration office. "He is tired after a long trip."

Beruaveau said he would give a news conference on Monday.

Later, Duvalier appeared on a balcony of the Karibe Hotel and waved to supporters and journalists outside. All he said was "tomorrow, tomorrow," apparently in reference to the news conference.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/01/16/baby-doc-duvalier-haiti-long-exile/

Yukon
01-17-2011, 10:09 AM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.

Rockntractor
01-17-2011, 10:12 AM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.

You don't believe the stuff you say.
I'm betting the Englishmen will smack you flatter than a cross eyed possum today!

txradioguy
01-17-2011, 10:16 AM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.

Typical Libtard...support any and all dictators no matter how brutal.

As for Iraq. Only people who haven't been to Iraq make dumbass comments like that.

Yukon
01-17-2011, 10:37 AM
You don't believe the stuff you say.
I'm betting the Englishmen will smack you flatter than a cross eyed possum today!

Countries like Haiti and to the same extent Iraq require strong-arm dictator type to quell the superstitions that are evident in these countries. For example when Britain ruled most of Africa including the middle-east the regions were stable as was India and Pakistan. These are "tribal" people and for the most part democratic governance is not possible.

txradioguy
01-17-2011, 11:03 AM
Countries like Haiti and to the same extent Iraq require strong-arm dictator type to quell the superstitions that are evident in these countries. For example when Britain ruled most of Africa including the middle-east the regions were stable as was India and Pakistan. These are "tribal" people and for the most part democratic governance is not possible.

Why are you so goddammed stupid?

Rockntractor
01-17-2011, 11:06 AM
Countries like Haiti and to the same extent Iraq require strong-arm dictator type to quell the superstitions that are evident in these countries. For example when Britain ruled most of Africa including the middle-east the regions were stable as was India and Pakistan. These are "tribal" people and for the most part democratic governance is not possible.

We really need to work on your racism,why does the Dominican Republic not have the same problem?

Yukon
01-17-2011, 11:13 AM
We really need to work on your racism,why does the Dominican Republic not have the same problem?

For one thing they never had a catastrophic disaster.

nightflight
01-17-2011, 11:43 AM
For one thing they never had a catastrophic disaster.

So it was all hunky-dory in Haiti before the quake?

Yukon
01-17-2011, 12:05 PM
So it was all hunky-dory in Haiti before the quake?

I dont know but it was better than it is now.

Zathras
01-17-2011, 12:09 PM
http://www.slackers.co.za/uploads/20100803/shark_derp_durr_hurr.jpg.

Fixed.

Time to bring back the Derp for Pukeon

Odysseus
01-17-2011, 12:40 PM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.
Spoken like someone who has never been to either place.

Countries like Haiti and to the same extent Iraq require strong-arm dictator type to quell the superstitions that are evident in these countries. For example when Britain ruled most of Africa including the middle-east the regions were stable as was India and Pakistan. These are "tribal" people and for the most part democratic governance is not possible.

Scratch a leftist, find a bigot. Go figure.

NJCardFan
01-17-2011, 01:02 PM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.

Are you serious? Iraq was safer? Wow. It's not like me to use wiki as anything more than a reference but...

In 2002, a resolution sponsored by the European Union was adopted by the Commission for Human Rights, which stated that there had been no improvement in the human rights crisis in Iraq. The statement condemned President Saddam Hussein's government for its "systematic, widespread and extremely grave violations of human rights and international humanitarian law". The resolution demanded that Iraq immediately put an end to its "summary and arbitrary executions... the use of rape as a political tool and all enforced and involuntary disappearances".[1]

Full political participation at the national level was restricted only to members of the Arab Ba'ath Party, which constituted only 8% of the population.

Iraqi citizens were not allowed to assemble legally unless it was to express support for the government. The Iraqi government controlled the establishment of political parties, regulated their internal affairs and monitored their activities.

Police checkpoints on Iraq's roads and highways prevented ordinary citizens from traveling abroad without government permission and expensive exit visas. Before traveling, an Iraqi citizen had to post collateral. Iraqi women could not travel outside of the country without the escort of a male relative.[2]

The activities of citizens living inside Iraq who received money from relatives abroad were closely monitored[citation needed].

Halabja poison gas attack:The Halabja poison gas attack occurred in the period 15–19 March 1988 during the Iran–Iraq War when chemical weapons were used by the Iraqi government forces and thousands of civilians in the Iraqi Kurdish town of Halabja were killed.[3]

Al-Anfal Campaign: In 1988, the Hussein regime began a campaign of extermination against the Kurdish people living in Northern Iraq. This is known as the Anfal campaign. The campaign was mostly directed at Shiite kurds (Faili Kurds) who sided with Iranians during the Iraq-Iran War. The attacks resulted in the death of at least 50,000 (some reports estimate as many as 100,000 people), many of them women and children. A team of Human Rights Watch investigators determined, after analyzing eighteen tons of captured Iraqi documents, testing soil samples and carrying out interviews with more than 350 witnesses, that the attacks on the Kurdish people were characterized by gross violations of human rights, including mass executions and disappearances of many tens of thousands of noncombatants, widespread use of chemical weapons including Sarin, mustard gas and nerve agents that killed thousands, the arbitrary imprisoning of tens of thousands of women, children, and elderly people for months in conditions of extreme deprivation, forced displacement of hundreds of thousands of villagers after the demolition of their homes, and the wholesale destruction of nearly two thousand villages along with their schools, mosques, farms, and power stations.[3][4]

In April 1991, after Saddam lost control of Kuwait in the Persian Gulf War, he cracked down ruthlessly against several uprisings in the Kurdish north and the Shia south. His forces committed wholesale massacres and other gross human rights violations against both groups similar to the violations mentioned before. Estimates of deaths during that time range from 20,000 to 100,000 for Kurds, and 60,000 to 130,000 for Shi'ites.[5]

In June 1994, the Hussein regime in Iraq established severe penalties, including amputation, branding and the death penalty for criminal offenses such as theft, corruption, currency speculation and military desertion, while government members and Saddam's family members were immune from punishments ranging around these crimes.[6]

On March 23, 2003, during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Iraqi television presented and interviewed prisoners of war on TV, violating the Geneva Convention.

Also in April 2003, CNN revealed that it had withheld information about Iraq torturing journalists and Iraqi citizens in the 1990s. According to CNN's chief news executive, the channel had been concerned for the safety not only of its own staff, but also of Iraqi sources and informants, who could expect punishment for speaking freely to reporters. Also according to the executive, "other news organizations were in the same bind."[7]

After the 2003 invasion of Iraq, several mass graves were found in Iraq containing several thousand bodies total, and more are being uncovered to this day[citation needed]. While most of the dead in the graves were believed to have died in the 1991 uprising against Saddam Hussein, some of them appeared to have died due to executions or died at times other than the 1991 rebellion.

Also after the invasion, numerous torture centers were found in security offices and police stations throughout Iraq. The equipment found at these centers typically included hooks for hanging people by the hands for beatings, devices for electric shock, and other equipment often found in nations with harsh security services and other authoritarian nations.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saddam_Hussein's_Iraq
Yeah. Iraq was a garden spot of liberty. :rolleyes:

lacarnut
01-17-2011, 01:12 PM
I dont know cause I am an idiot.

FIXED

linda22003
01-17-2011, 01:26 PM
Paradoxically this guy might be exactly what is needed in Haiti. Iraq was much safer and the people were better off under Saddam.

It would have been a shorter and more accurate post if you had just written, "I don't know squat about recent Haitian history."

Zathras
01-17-2011, 04:49 PM
It would have been a shorter and more accurate post if you had just written, "I don't know squat about anything."

Fixed....Linda, if you're going to correct Pukeon do it right, not just halfway. :D

swirling_vortex
01-17-2011, 06:25 PM
I dont know but it was better than it is now.
http://blog.barfoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/o_rly001.jpg

Nubs
01-17-2011, 07:42 PM
I dont know but it was better than it is now.

Wow, the stupid is strong in this one

Safe in the warm embrace of his ignorance

NJCardFan
01-18-2011, 12:36 AM
I dont know but it was better than it is now.

Now I know you're a sock puppet. "I don't know but it was better than it is now". How can you make a comparison when you admit you don't know what Haiti was like under the Duvalier's? Asshole doesn't begin to describe you.

Yukon
01-18-2011, 10:19 AM
I was there.

Odysseus
01-18-2011, 10:37 AM
I was there.

In Haiti? Then you should know what a corrupt set of monsters the Duvaliers were.

Why is it that leftists are such suckers for dictators?

txradioguy
01-18-2011, 10:44 AM
In Haiti? Then you should know what a corrupt set of monsters the Duvaliers were.

Why is it that leftists are such suckers for dictators?

Something about that iron fisted way of ruling and crushing dissenting opinions really appeals to the Libtards.

Zathras
01-18-2011, 10:46 AM
I was there.

Employed by Baby Doc eh.....no wonder you think it was better then.

Yukon
01-18-2011, 10:59 AM
In Haiti? Then you should know what a corrupt set of monsters the Duvaliers were.

Why is it that leftists are such suckers for dictators?

I was working in Hati installing a telephone switching office - it was OK at the time, people were nice and things were cheap.

Madisonian
01-18-2011, 11:06 AM
Why is it that leftists are such suckers for dick tasters?

"Horribly mean but could not help it" fix for cheap laughs.:D

Apache
01-18-2011, 11:07 AM
I was working in Hati installing a telephone switching office - it was OK at the time, people were nice and things were cheap.

Sorry I call Bullshit... don't believe you...

NJCardFan
01-18-2011, 11:12 AM
Sorry I call Bullshit... don't believe you...

Especially considering that this idiot said that they didn't know how things were under the Duvalier's. I think it's time to ban this dick.

Apache
01-18-2011, 11:44 AM
Especially considering that this idiot aid that they didn't know how things were under the Duvalier's. I think it's time to ban this dick.

That and the fact he can't spell Haiti correctly are dead giveaways...:rolleyes: Any more yarns you care to spin, Yukon?

txradioguy
01-18-2011, 01:37 PM
Uh-oh.

Haiti Police Escort Ex-Dictator From Hotel

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/01/18/haiti-police-escort-ex-dictator-hotel/?test=latestnews

Odysseus
01-18-2011, 01:49 PM
I was working in Hati installing a telephone switching office - it was OK at the time, people were nice and things were cheap.

No doubt the lives of those nice people were held as cheaply by their government as the trinkets that you purchased with US or Canadian dollars. The Duvaliers were corrupt kleptocrats, and if they seemed marginally less evil than Jean-Bertrand Aristide , it is only because Aristide was more of an overt sadist. Preval, the current president, is no better, and his alliance with Hugo Chavez makes him a liability, as well.

Haiti has the same geography as the Dominican Republic which, while hardly a model of governance, is nowhere near as impoverished and desperate. Haiti's per capita GDP, for example, was $1,338 in 2009, while in the Dominican Republic, it was $8,200.

Frankly, there is little that the US can do for Haiti, barring an outright invasion and annexation of the island, followed by massive reform of every institution there, something that we have no business doing.

NJCardFan
01-18-2011, 02:22 PM
No doubt the lives of those nice people were held as cheaply by their government as the trinkets that you purchased with US or Canadian dollars. The Duvaliers were corrupt kleptocrats, and if they seemed marginally less evil than Jean-Bertrand Aristide , it is only because Aristide was more of an overt sadist. Preval, the current president, is no better, and his alliance with Hugo Chavez makes him a liability, as well.

Haiti has the same geography as the Dominican Republic which, while hardly a model of governance, is nowhere near as impoverished and desperate. Haiti's per capita GDP, for example, was $1,338 in 2009, while in the Dominican Republic, it was $8,200.

Frankly, there is little that the US can do for Haiti, barring an outright invasion and annexation of the island, followed by massive reform of every institution there, something that we have no business doing.
If they were ever going to give a visual aid to the term 'shit hole' all they need to do is show a picture of Haiti. It's been a year since the quake and, as a guy said on TV last night, if you look at Port au Prince, you'd think the quake happened yesterday. Over a billion dollars in U.S. aid alone has been sent in and conditions have not improved one iota thanks to the corrupt government of Haiti.

Odysseus
01-18-2011, 02:34 PM
If they were ever going to give a visual aid to the term 'shit hole' all they need to do is show a picture of Haiti. It's been a year since the quake and, as a guy said on TV last night, if you look at Port au Prince, you'd think the quake happened yesterday. Over a billion dollars in U.S. aid alone has been sent in and conditions have not improved one iota thanks to the corrupt government of Haiti.

Oh, I'm sure that things have improved immeasurably for the politicians who've pocketed the aid money. :rolleyes:

NJCardFan
01-18-2011, 05:24 PM
As someone said, the DR is on the other half of Hispaniola yet we hear nary a peep out of them not to mention that parts of the DR are paradises.

Rockntractor
01-18-2011, 05:42 PM
Uh-oh.

Haiti Police Escort Ex-Dictator From Hotel

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/01/18/haiti-police-escort-ex-dictator-hotel/?test=latestnews

He got some splanin to do!:eek:

Articulate_Ape
01-18-2011, 06:22 PM
Ya know, maybe it's just me, but I have a really hard time taking anyone nicknamed "Baby Doc" very seriously.

Apache
01-18-2011, 06:45 PM
Ya know, maybe it's just me, but I have a really hard time taking anyone nicknamed "Baby Doc" very seriously.

He had an entire country take him seriously... Those who didn't, paid dearly...

Articulate_Ape
01-18-2011, 06:48 PM
He had an entire country take him seriously... Those who didn't, paid dearly...

I am well-aware of that. I'm just sayin'.

Apache
01-18-2011, 06:51 PM
I am well-aware of that. I'm just sayin'.

I knew you did, I just find nothing humorous about the man including his name. That's just me :)

Articulate_Ape
01-18-2011, 06:59 PM
I knew you did, I just find nothing humorous about the man including his name. That's just me :)

Right. "They have underestimated the power of the dark side, so now they will pay with their lives. Send in Baby Doc."

Sorry, bad guys really need to have better nicknames. ;)

Apache
01-18-2011, 07:45 PM
Right. "They have underestimated the power of the dark side, so now they will pay with their lives. Send in Baby Doc."

Sorry, bad guys really need to have better nicknames. ;)

Tell that to 'Baby-Face' Nelson...:eek: