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Gingersnap
01-28-2011, 09:43 AM
Egypt’s Internet Shutdown Can’t Stop Mass Protests

http://i53.tinypic.com/vgjtbl.png

In Cairo, al-Jazeera captured this picture: hundreds of people stopping in a thoroughfare to pray. That’s one of many scenes around Egypt today, as untold thousands of people are in the streets in a day of anger, battling back riot police and demanding an end to the 30-year dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak.

Why is the picture important? Because it shows that the protests are growing — despite the Egyptian government shut down of Internet access and cellular communications.

The past four days’ worth of protests in Egypt, spurred by those that dethroned the Tunisian government on Jan. 14, have been accelerated by social media. The #Jan25 hashtag gave the leaderless revolt an internal organizing tool and global communications reach. So it shouldn’t be surprising that the Mubarak regime responded by ordering the withdrawal over 3,500 Border Gateway Protocol routes by Egyptian service providers, shutting down approximately 88 percent of the country’s Internet access, according to networking firm BGPMon.

But the so-called “Day of Wrath” is uninterrupted. On al-Jazeera a few minutes ago, a functionary from Mubarak’s National Democratic Party called the uprising “unprecedented” and conceded that the government needs a “non-traditional way of dealing with this,” including “action against corruption, against poverty… [giving] more freedoms.” He said all this while police and the Army are firing tear gas at the demonstrators.

Of course, the demonstrators have an offline networking tool: the mosques. Protests were scheduled all over Egypt for Friday in order to capitalize on the ability of the religious establishment to gather, organize, inspire and deploy large groups of people, with all the legitimacy that the mosques command. If the government continues the communications shutdown, it’s an open question whether the protesters can sustain their analog organizational momentum.

Wired (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/01/egypts-internet-shutdown-cant-stop-mass-protests/)

Molon Labe
01-28-2011, 11:27 AM
Wow...

things getting real serious too. http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

Gingersnap
01-28-2011, 11:59 AM
The headquarters of the ruling political party are now on fire.

Arroyo_Doble
01-28-2011, 12:01 PM
I believe the point of no return has been reached. The jinn is out of the bottle. Parachute's packed. Cakes are on the griddle. The fire has been lit and extinguisher is in the other room.

Pick your metaphor.

Rockntractor
01-28-2011, 12:05 PM
I believe the point of no return has been reached. The jinn is out of the bottle. Parachute's packed. Cakes are on the griddle. The fire has been lit and extinguisher is in the other room.

Pick your metaphor.

The camel left the tent!

ABC in Georgia
01-28-2011, 02:47 PM
Hurry! Hurry!

Before they run out.

Get your excrement repellant fans here. www.srfans.com

$5.00 off if ordered in the next 10 minutes! Operators standing by.

Odysseus
01-28-2011, 03:55 PM
Hmmmm... Muslims stopping traffic to pray in the streets... Must be a holiday.


I believe the point of no return has been reached. The jinn is out of the bottle. Parachute's packed. Cakes are on the griddle. The fire has been lit and extinguisher is in the other room.

Pick your metaphor.
How about, "Don't count your chickens before they're hateched?"

This could go either way. The Egyptian government has a large, extremely effective repression aparatus which is probably going to go all out to put this down, as they don't want to end up like the Shah's supporters when Khomeini took power. The big question will be whether or not the government has decided that it is willing to use lethal force to put down the riots.

BTW, is it me, or has anyone else noticed that the Obama administration is far more supportive of jihadis in Egypt who are trying to overthrow a nominally friendly government than it was to Iranians who were trying to overthrow an extremely unfriendly and dangerous government?

Arroyo_Doble
01-28-2011, 04:12 PM
How about, "Don't count your chickens before they're hateched?"


I was just talking about the fuse being lit and of course, it can go either way but no doubt it is going forward. If I had to bet, I would go a military junta at this point.


This could go either way. The Egyptian government has a large, extremely effective repression aparatus which is probably going to go all out to put this down, as they don't want to end up like the Shah's supporters when Khomeini took power. The big question will be whether or not the government has decided that it is willing to use lethal force to put down the riots.

Hard to put down a million with out killing a thousand.


BTW, is it me, or has anyone else noticed that the Obama administration is far more supportive of jihadis in Egypt who are trying to overthrow a nominally friendly government than it was to Iranians who were trying to overthrow an extremely unfriendly and dangerous government?

The Brotherhood is showing opportunism and are not behind this that I can see. They have kept their pie holes shut until it was obvious there was a large support (I assumed that was who you were talking about).

This is a popular uprising and not a "jihad."

As far as the administration, they seem to be saying the same thing about respect and freedom they did then except some nice words for the president of Egypt. Also, that was an election dispute. This isn't.

Odysseus
01-28-2011, 04:34 PM
I was just talking about the fuse being lit and of course, it can go either way but no doubt it is going forward. If I had to bet, I would go a military junta at this point.
Could be. The critical factor is how badly the government wants to stay in power. If they have the will to suppress this, they certainly have the means. If not, then all of the ordnance in the world won't make a difference.


Hard to put down a million with out killing a thousand.
The Muslim Brotherhood staged a revolt in the Syrian city of Hama in 1982. Hafez al-Assad sent in his special forces and other elite army units and Mukhabarat agents. He demandedthat the city be surrendered and declared that anyone who remained after his deadline would be considered an ally of the rebels. He then had his artillery level the city. Estimates vary, but at least 17,000 people (or up to 40,000) died, and the Muslim Brotherhood was driven out of Syria. One thousand dead would be nothing compared to that.


The Brotherhood is showing opportunism and are not behind this that I can see. They have kept their pie holes shut until it was obvious there was a large support (I assumed that was who you were talking about).

This is a popular uprising and not a "jihad."
Kefaya, the coalition of Egyptian opposition groups, consists of a number of elements, including communists, Ba'athists, etc., but the single largest and best organized group is the Muslim Brotherhood, which is independent of Kefaya, but has worked with it in the past. The question is, which of the other groups has the means to communicate throughout the country, organize protests and draw on the kind of manpower to present large scale rallies and riots? The fact that this was organized through the mosque network should tell you that the Brotherhood, which controls much of the religious infrastructure of Egypt, has its hands all over this.


As far as the administration, they seem to be saying the same thing about respect and freedom they did then except some nice words for the president of Egypt. Also, that was an election dispute. This isn't.

Hillary has come out in favor of the protestors. That means that the State Dept. is backing them.

Arroyo_Doble
01-28-2011, 04:37 PM
Kefaya, the coalition of Egyptian opposition groups, consists of a number of elements, including communists, Ba'athists, etc., but the single largest and best organized group is the Muslim Brotherhood, which is independent of Kefaya, but has worked with it in the past. The question is, which of the other groups has the means to communicate throughout the country, organize protests and draw on the kind of manpower to present large scale rallies and riots? The fact that this was organized through the mosque network should tell you that the Brotherhood, which controls much of the religious infrastructure of Egypt, has its hands all over this.



Maybe. But to me, they seem to be "us too!" late comers to the party. We'll see, I suppose.

Gingersnap
01-28-2011, 04:42 PM
The Brotherhood is showing opportunism and are not behind this that I can see. They have kept their pie holes shut until it was obvious there was a large support (I assumed that was who you were talking about).

This is a popular uprising and not a "jihad."

As far as the administration, they seem to be saying the same thing about respect and freedom they did then except some nice words for the president of Egypt. Also, that was an election dispute. This isn't.

I think that's exactly right. The Brotherhood is just looking for an opportunity, not spear-heading any of the momentum. This really is a popular uprising. Even if they don't get it right this time, the course will be set for increased liberty and freedom down the road.

Odysseus
01-28-2011, 04:46 PM
Maybe. But to me, they seem to be "us too!" late comers to the party. We'll see, I suppose.

It's the other way around. The Muslim Brotherhood has been fighting this fight since it was founded in the 1920s.

Besides, it doesn't matter who leads the first events, it matters who is best situated to take power when the government collapses. The Bolshevik, French and assorted other revolutions demonstrated that the best-organized, most militant and best-armed faction usually siezes control, regardless of the nature of the coalition in the beginning. In this case, that's the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been organizing, arming and training for decades. In addition, they will have external support from other nations which share their enemies list, and seek to foment global jihad. Despite the Sunni/Shia split, the Alawite Syrians, Shiite Iranians and, of course, the Wahhabi radicals in Saudi Arabia will support the Brothers. If the government falls, expect a brief period of national unity, followed by a power struggle, purge and totalitarian Islamist control.

Nubs
01-28-2011, 05:33 PM
This looks as if it repeating the 79 Iranian Revolution. No one saw it coming, missed by the CIA, it was started by the intellectuals, dismissed by some as "Yeah, the strong arm Shah is gone" but then what took hold, we see today. With all the uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Albania, etc.. are we witnessing "Caliphate Rising"??

Nubs
01-28-2011, 05:37 PM
It's the other way around. The Muslim Brotherhood has been fighting this fight since it was founded in the 1920s.

Besides, it doesn't matter who leads the first events, it matters who is best situated to take power when the government collapses. The Bolshevik, French and assorted other revolutions demonstrated that the best-organized, most militant and best-armed faction usually siezes control, regardless of the nature of the coalition in the beginning. In this case, that's the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been organizing, arming and training for decades. In addition, they will have external support from other nations which share their enemies list, and seek to foment global jihad. Despite the Sunni/Shia split, the Alawite Syrians, Shiite Iranians and, of course, the Wahhabi radicals in Saudi Arabia will support the Brothers. If the government falls, expect a brief period of national unity, followed by a power struggle, purge and totalitarian Islamist control.

Don't forget Germany. Even though it was a quasi peaceful transfer of power to Hitler, it was the best organized, most militant and best armed faction from within the instigating coalition that siezed ultimate power during the "Night of the Long Knives."

Articulate_Ape
01-28-2011, 08:53 PM
Isn't Bam Bam looking to get a kill switch for our Internet? I'm just sayin'.

Kay
01-28-2011, 09:59 PM
BTW, is it me, or has anyone else noticed that the Obama administration is far more supportive of jihadis in Egypt who are trying to overthrow a nominally friendly government than it was to Iranians who were trying to overthrow an extremely unfriendly and dangerous government?

Yes I did notice that too.

Rockntractor
01-28-2011, 10:36 PM
Yes I did notice that too.

We elected our enemy.